Natural Holistic Remedies for Shingles

Just recently a good friend of mine came down with shingles. Aww man, I feel so bad for her. It must be horrible, and I wish there was more I could do for her to ease her suffering, so it prompted me to look it up in my article list. Sure enough, I found it was one of my orphaned articles from the old Yahoo Contributor Network / Associated Content library. I’m going to pass is on to her and hopefully have enough ingredients to make her my relief spray. She’s at the doc’s now, and hopefully they’ll give her something to alleviate the horrible symptoms.

Anyway, here’s the article from 2009 in it’s entirety:

There are so many natural and holistic remedies for all types of maladies these days that it is difficult to weed through all the bad or mis-information strewn across the web. This series of articles, “Natural Holistic Remedies” will address only the tried and true remedies and natural therapies, either through personal experience or gathered from trusted sources. I’ve been studying these types of holistic cures and aids for over over 20 years and have discovered many new concepts as well as debunking some older (and some newer ones too).

General Shingles Information

Shingles, also known as herpes zoster, is a viral infection of the nerve roots. Shingles affects the nerve endings in the skin and results in pain and a rash. Shingles affects 750,000 Americans annually. It can strike at any age but is most common in people older than 40.

Possible Causes of Shingles

Shingles is caused by the same virus that causes chicken pox When a person has chicken pox, it lives dormant in the body. If it becomes active, it results in a case of the shingles, not another bout of the chicken pox. Approximately 90 percent of people who have chicken pox are at risk of developing shingles. Stress, cancer, use of anti-cancer drugs, spinal cord injuries, the common cold and immune system problems can trigger shingles. People who have never contracted chicken pox have very little chance of developing shingles.

Possible Symptoms of Shingles

The first signs of shingles appear as three or four days of chills, fever, body aches and sometimes pain in the affected area. Then tiny blisters with red rims appear, along with extreme pain and sensitivity at the site. Other symptoms of shingles include fatigue, numbness, depression, tingling, shooting pains, swollen lymph nodes, headache and fever. This phase usually lasts one week to 10 days, when the blisters dry up and fall off. In most cases, shingles lasts a few weeks, but some people can experience pain for months.

Possible Lifestyle Changes for Shingles

There is no way to prevent shingles, but people can avoid getting chicken pox by being immunized with the vermicelli vaccine. People who have never had chicken pox should avoid contact with anyone who has the disease. Avoid contact with anyone with shingles because the fluid from the blisters is extremely contagious. Pregnant women, infants, children and anyone with immune deficiencies should not be in contact with anyone with chicken pox or shingles. Also, things like meditation, Yoga, Pilates, or any naturally calming practices will help keep shingles to a minimum as stress makes shingles worse. Try to keep stress and anxiety to a minimum, whatever works for you!

Personal Experience: Shingles “Natural Remedy” Skeptics

If you’ve ever had shingles before, you know the pain that can be associated with it. Both a cousin and a friend of mine came down with shingles and were both in serious enough pain to ask me for help. While one was very skeptic of “natural cures”, the other was right away willing to try my natural remedy. Needless to say, after making them my “Shingles Relief Spray” and advising them of some dietary adjustments, they are both believers and ask me for all kinds of natural cures and advice now.

Beneficial Dietary & Herbal Aids

  • L-Lysine is important for healing and for fighting the virus that causes shingles.
  • Vitamin C with Bioflavonoids aids in fighting the shingles virus.
  • Vitamin B Complex is needed for nerve health and to counteract deficiencies.
  • Zinc enhances immunity and protects against infection.
  • Calcium and Magnesium for nerve function and healing.
  • Garlic is excellent for building the immune system.
  • SAMe aids in reducing pain and inflammation.
  • Cayenne relieves pain and aids healing.
  • Lemon Balm – This lemon scented herb helps the body fight viruses.
  • Licorice – The licorice has virus-fighting ingredients that can inhibit the herpes simplex virus. It appears to interfere with the growth of the virus. It also fights inflammation and can be used instead of products containing cortisone without the side effects. Taken internally, it can be used as a tea and is often blended with other herbs for taste. Do not take for longer than 6 weeks at a time, and do not take licorice if you have high blood pressure or a history of heart disease.
  • Alfalfa and Dandelion promotes healing.
  • Baikal Skullcap This is an herb that has been used since ancient times in China. It fights bacteria and infections, so it is helpful in treating shingles as well as many other conditions. Used topically, you can make a paste using the ground root mixed with water. Apply the paste to the affected areas as needed.
  • Astragalus Root and Echinacea boosts immune function.
  • Bi phaya yaw (Clinacanthus nutans)- an herb used in traditional Thai medicine, has been shown in clinical studies to shorten the time it takes to recover from shingles in some cases. It is applied in cream form.
  • Olive leaf extract aids in fighting the virus of shingles. Eat plenty of foods that contain vitamin B6, including bananas, nuts, potatoes, and sweet potatoes.
  • A combination of oat straw, St. John’s wort, and skullcap helps to reduce stress and itching. Mix equal amounts of oat straw, St. John’s wort, and skullcap tinctures together, and take one teaspoon of this mixture four times daily.

Yellowstar Essentials All Natural Shingles Relief

Analgesic, Anti-Bacterial, Anti-Inflammatory, Antiseptic, Anti-Spasmodic, Anti-Viral, Anxiety-Relief, Antifungal, Cooling, Helps Problem Skin Recover Faster.

Ingredients: Aloe vera, Jojoba Oil and Sunflower oil, Ravensara Ravensara aromatica, Tea Tree Melaleuca alternifolia, Lavender Lavandula augustifolia, Bergamot Citrus bergamia, Thyme Thymus vulgaris ct linalol, German Chamomile Matricaria recutita, Clary Sage Salvia sclarea, Rosemary Rosmarinus officinalis, Eucalyptus Eucalyptus globulus, Oregano Origanum vulgare, and other natural essential oils.

For external use only. Avoid contact with eyes. If condition worsens or persists for more than seven days, discontinue use and consult a physician. May cause an allergic reaction in some individuals with sensitive skin; test on small area before use. If severe irritation occurs, discontinue use immediately and consult a physician. Do not apply to wounds or broken skin. Do not bandage tightly. Keep this and all drugs out of the reach of children. In case of accidental ingestion contact a Poison Control Center or physician immediately. Do not get on clothing. As with any drug, if you are pregnant or nursing a baby, seek the advice of a health professional before using this product.

REFERENCES:

Prescription for Nutritional Healing, 3rd Edition, Phyllis Balch, CNC; James F. Balch, M.D.

Yellowstar Essentials; click on “Natural Remedies Kits” on the left navigation box to find shingles relief spray

http://www.thehealthsuccesssite.com/shingles.html

DIY Natural Travel Kit with Essential Oils

imagesHow to Make a Natural Travel Kit with Essential Oils

Plus Recipes For; Sunburn Relief Spray, Jet Lag, Migraines, Stress Headaches, Nausea, Travel Sickness, Queasiness, Fear of Flying, and Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis

Aromatherapy can be a very helpful companion

when embarking upona long journey,

or even just a short trip,

and may even effectively replace some other

traditional medicines for those that are looking for

a natural alternative.

 

If you suffer from travel sickness,

headaches or migraines,

queasiness, fear of flying, jet lag,

insect bites and/or sun burns,

read on to find essential oil remedies that help with those maladies.

Original article published 2008 on Associated Content- posted here in full..Enjoy! Hope these tips help you on your next trip!

 

Aromatherapy can be a very helpful companion when embarking upon a long journey, or even just a short trip, and may even effectively replace some other traditional medicines for those that are looking for a natural alternative. While traveling may be a part of our work and our play, for those that suffer from travel-troubles it can be a nightmare. If you suffer from travel sickness, headaches or migraines, queasiness, fear of flying, jet lag, insect bites and sun burns, here you will find essential oil remedies to help with those maladies. I’ve also included a recipe for a massage blend to keep deep vein thrombosis at bay, as well.

Important Notes for Using Essential Oils; Dilutions and Usage of Essential Oils:

Always dilute essential oils, as they are very potent and too concentrated to use undiluted on the skin. To use essential oils in a massage, use the following dilutions:

For most people ages 12-65 add no more than 20 drops of your chosen essential oil(s) per ounce of carrier oils.

For those aged 4-6 or those over age 65, do not use more than 10 drops per ounce of carrier, and those aged 1-4, no more than 5 drops per ounce of carrier of safe essential oils.

For pregnant women or babies, only minute quantities of safe essential oils should be used. For instance, only 1-4 drops of essential oils should be used per ounce of carrier.

NOTE: Only Tea Tree, Lavender, Roman Chamomile 3%, Dill, and Mandarin (be careful of phototoxicity with citrus oils), as well as Eucalyptus Smithii (the mildest of all the Eucalyptus’) are safe for children and the elderly, and are the only essential oils that should be used on pregnant women, or children under 4 years old.

Here’s how to make your own natural travel kit with essential oils:

First, gather ingredients. Here’s a list of essential oils and items you’ll need;

  • Peppermint essential oil (peppermint supreme is best)
  • Lavender (French Lavender is best),
  • Ginger Root essential oil,
  • Eucalyptus Globulus (or Eucalyptus Smithii if using on children) essential oil,
  • Geranium essential oil,
  • Cypress essential oil (French Cypress is best),
  • Chamomile (Roman Chamomile 3% is best as it is less expensive than pure and is already diluted),
  • Grapeseed oil (or other carrier oil such as sweet almond, fractionated coconut, olive, sunflower, or mixture of carrier oils),
  • Aloe Vera liquid or gel (for insect bite relief roll-on)
  • Aromatherapy Inhalers (empty inhalers you can fill yourself),
  • 3.4 oz. (100ml) spray bottle (for sunburn relief spray), and
  • 3.4 oz. (100ml) plastic disc top bottle (for massage blend).
  • Small roll-on bottle for insect bite relief blend. I found a package of 12 roll-on bottles in 5ml size on amazon here.

Both types of empty bottles (spray bottles and massage blend bottles) can be purchased at Walmart or Dollar Tree, and Mountain Rose Herbs is a great place for essential oils and carriers . An easy way to label the aromatherapy inhalers is to write the title on a small piece of paper (about 1/2 in. by 1.5 in. will fit most inhalers), and cover the label with clear tape to prevent water ruining the label. Then attach the label to the inhaler with more clear tape. I use clear shipping tape, as it is wide enough to cover the label and reach over the edges, so it sticks to the label and the inhaler. Same goes for the massage bottle label, except for the size of the paper.

Recipes for Natural Travel Kit:

Sunburn relief spray – For the 3.4 oz (100ml) bottle

  • 1 oz Aloe Vera Gel
  • 2 oz purified water
  • 20 drops Lavender essential oil
  • 10 drops Vitamin E Oil (or 2-3 Vit. E oil caplets)
  • 10 drops Peppermint essential oil
  • 15 drops Roman Chamomile 3% essential oil

Mix, and shake well before each use. Spray over affected area whenever needed.

Here are a few extra tips to help heal sunburn quickly: Drink plenty of water, stay out of the sun until the sunburn completely heals, and avoid drinking any alcohol–because alcohol dehydrates you and your body needs water to repair the damaged skin. Also, wear loose natural clothing like light cottons, or silks.

Insect bite relief– For the 5ml roll-on bottle

  • 25 drops of Lavender essential oil
  • 20 drops of Tea Tree essential oil
  • 50 drops of Aloe Vera liquid (or thinned-out aloe gel)

Add ingredients to roll-on bottle, shake well. Replace roller ball and cap. Roll directly on the bite to relieve itching as well as promote healing.

Jet lag aromatherapy inhaler

  • 2 drops Peppermint essential oil
  • 2 drops Geranium or Rose Geranium essential oil

Open the inhaler; add the drops of essential oils on the cotton filter. Place the cotton filter in the inhaler tube and close the bottom. Be sure to mark the inhaler so you know what’s inside. Inhale gently whenever needed. Here are a few extra tips for naturally preventing jet lag: Make sure to drink plenty of water to stay hydrated, no alcoholic or caffeinated drinks. Try ordering a ginger ale or a water when you are flying. Also, for some, taking two capsules of ginger before flying really helps. Also make sure to keep moving, it isn’t helpful to stay stagnant the whole trip. If you can’t walk around, just do some simple exercises while sitting. Try some leg raises, palm contractions, or roll your ankles and feet in circles with your legs stretched out as far as they can. Also be sure to eat healthy meals on time, don’t skip any meals.

Aromatherapy inhaler and massage oil recipe for migraines, stress headache, nausea and depression

  • 2 drops Roman Chamomile
  • 4 drops Lavender
  • 2 drops Peppermint

Make an aromatherapy inhaler by opening the empty inhaler, adding the drops to the filter, replacing filter, and closing the inhaler tube. You can take this with you on any trip because of its small size. Be sure to mark the inhaler so you know what’s inside. You can also make a massage oil by adding these oils to a carrier. To make this into a massage oil in the 3.4 oz (100ml) bottle, use 30 drops Lavender, 15 drops R.Chamomile, and 15 drops Peppermint essential oils to 3 oz. of carrier like Grapeseed oil. Shake well, and be sure to add a label to the bottle or inhaler, so you always know what’s inside. To use the massage oil, shake well, and massage about 1 tsp. of the blend into the mastoids behind the ear, as well as the temples (being careful not to get any in the eyes). You may also massage over the abdominal/naval area if you wish. Do this hourly. You can also place a warm compress over the stomach after the oils are applied. Use the inhaler 4-6 times per hour, or as needed.

Travel sickness aromatherapy inhaler

If you get travel sickness when you fly, or when on a cruise ship, make an aromatherapy inhaler and gently inhale before and during your trip. This will help to calm and relax you, inside and out, whenever you feel ill from traveling. This blend is also good for stress when dealing with flight turbulence.

  • 4 drops of Peppermint
  • 4 drops of Lavender

To make the aromatherapy travel sickness inhaler open the inhaler; add the drops of essential oils on the cotton filter, then put the cotton filter back in the inhaler tube and close the bottom. Be sure to mark the inhaler so you know what’s inside. Inhale gently whenever needed.

Travel queasiness aromatherapy inhaler

If you are prone to your stomach leaping, turning and churning during a flight, make this blend for your inhaler as it really helps with queasiness. This blend is also good for stress when dealing with flight turbulence.

  • 6 drops of Ginger
  • 2 drops of Peppermint

To make the aromatherapy queasiness inhaler open the inhaler; add the drops of essential oils on the cotton filter, then put the cotton filter back in the inhaler tube and close the bottom. Be sure to mark the inhaler so you know what’s inside. Inhale gently to help settle your stomach.

Fear of flying aromatherapy inhaler

This blend is perfect for those who suffer from fear of flying. Inhale for a few minutes before takeoff, and again during the flight.

  • 4 drops of Chamomile Roman 3%
  • 2 drops of Lavender

To make the aromatherapy fear of flying inhaler open the inhaler; add the drops of essential oils on the cotton filter, then put the cotton filter back in the inhaler tube and close the bottom. Be sure to mark the inhaler so you know what’s inside. Inhale gently whenever needed. The calming properties of these oils will help you relax the entire flight.

Travel massage oil

  • 3 oz. or 90 ml of grape seed oil
  • 15 drops Eucalyptus globulus (or Eucalyptus Smitii)
  • 5 drops of Cypress French
  • 5 drops Ginger essential oil

Combine all ingredients in the disc-top bottle and shake well before use. Apply to the skin by pouring out about 1 tabelspoon in your palm, rubbing palms together to warm oil, and gently massaging your legs. Here are a few other tips for preventing deep vein thrombosis:

Try to move as often as possible during long trips to prevent deep vein thrombosis from occurring, (which is caused by blood clots forming in the legs due to the lack of movement). Exercise your lower calf muscles if you’ll be sitting a long time. Whenever possible, get up and walk around. If you can’t get up to walk around, try raising and lowering your heels while keeping your toes on the floor, then raising your toes while your heels are on the floor.

Extra Notes on Essential Oils for Travel:

Peppermint, Ginger, and Lavender essential oils are the best for relieving nausea, motion sickness, or just feeling queasy. Keep these close at hand for trips.

Lavender is one of those essential oils that you should always have for a multitude of purposes, as it can be used for almost anything because of it being a natural balancer,

Also, Rosemary, Peppermint, and Grapefruit are great for an invigorating blend that stimulates physical and mental energy.

Cypress essential oil is also great for cellulite, varicose veins, water retention, stress, nervous tension, menstrual problems, as well as a good anti-inflammatory.

Ginger essential oil is also useful for treating rheumatism, arthritis, nausea, hangovers, colds and flu, congestion, coughs, sinusitis, cramps, chills, fever, bruising, sore throat and diarrhea.


Resources & More Reading:

Esoteric Oils; http://www.essentialoils.co.za/treatment/jet-lag.htm

BirchHillHappenings; http://birchhillhappenings.com/motion.htm

New Directions Aromatics; essential oils for travel

Find Ingredients and Supplies:

Roll-on Bottles

Aromatherapy Inhalers

Mountain Rose Herbs for essential oils and carriers

Bottle (100mL)+Spray Pump Atomizer Sprayer Empty Bottle

Yellowstar Essentials Essential Oil Travel Kit; http://sites.google.com/site/yellowstaressentials/Home/aromatherapy

More Reading on Essential Oils & Natural Remedies

List of Essential Oils for Specific Emotions

Can Essential Oils Help with Depression & Anxiety? Using Aromatherapy as a Mood Regulator

 

Original article at :  http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/7884542/how_to_make_a_natural_travel_kit_with.html?cat=5

FromNatureWithLove.com

Archangel Michael Blend

If you are looking to connect with Archangel Michael, or just need the protection or help of this powerful angel, look to your heart, and ask Michael specifically for what you need.

Thankfulness and Gratitude are two sure-fire ways to open the communication pathways between humans and angels, and it doesn’t hurt to have the scents and energies they like around while asking. Creating your own all natural essential oil blend to aid the process.

This is the original Yellowstar Essentials Archangel Michael Blend made with undiluted essential oils only. 

Carriers (as in carrier oils such as; Sweet Almond, Grapeseed, Cocoanut, etc.) are added after your blend has a little time to meld together.   This anointing blend will connect you to the energy of Archangel Michael. Diluted in fractionated coconut oil or other carriers, it will be safe for use on the skin.


Archangel Michael Blend 

TOP NOTES (drops) 

Elemi 10

Lemon 3

Ravensara 3

Lemon Blossom 7

Bergamot 4

MIDDLE NOTES (drops)

Jasmine 3 full drops

Rose 2 full drops

Neroli 3  full drops

Lavender 5

Hyssop 3

BASE NOTES (drops)

Sacred Frankincense 3

Myrrh 2 full drops

Galbanum 2 full drops

Atlas Cedarwood 7

Star Anise 1

Sandalwood 3

If you want to use this blend for an anointing oil, perfume oil, or the like, add beeswax and carrier oils to the consistency you like. (wax must be melted and stirred into warm carriers, then cooled to see the thickness and consistency of your final product… it can always be remelted and more wax added). 

 

more info from http://bodysoulmind.net/spirit/essential-oils-and-archangels:


ARCHANGEL MICHAEL (Beshter, Mikail, Sabbathiel, Saint Michael)

Archangel Michael’s name means ‘he who is like God’.

Archangel Michael’s functions are to oversee Lightworker’s life purpose and to rid all toxins associated with fear.  He also assists with bravery and heroic deeds.

Archangel Michael guides and directs people who feel unsure of their life purpose or soul mission, and provides guidance in regards to which positive steps to take.

Archangel Michael inspires leaders, bolsters courage, gives direction, energy and vitality, offers protection and motivation, and increases self-worth and self-esteem.

The essential oils to use for protection, security, safety, empowerment, releasing fears and overcoming obstacles with Archangel Michael are:

Anise Star  –  Aniseed  –  Black Pepper  –  Cajeput  –  Carnation  –  Clary Sage  –  Clove  –  Cumin  –  Elemi  –  Frankincense  –  Galbanum  –  Geranium  –  Ginger  –  Hyssop  –  Juniper  –  Lavender  –  Lime  –  Melissa  –  Mimosa  –  Myrrh  –  Niaouli  –  Oak moss  –  Palmarosa  –  Pimento Berry  –  Pine  –  Rosemary  –  Sage  –  Sweet Fennel  –  Tea-tree  –  Thyme  –  Valerian  –  Violet  –  Yarrow

To banish negativity and dispel phobias, apprehension and anxiety with the help of Archangel Michael, use one of the following essential oils:

Bergamot  –  Camphor  –  Chamomile  –  Eucalyptus  –  Hyssop  –  Lavender  –  Lime  –  Mandarin  –  Neroli  –  Peppermint  –  Rose  –  Sage  –  Sandalwood  –  Sweet Marjoram  –  Ylang Ylang

Fabulous Testimonial for Yellowstar Essentials!

Wow!

I am extremely humbled and honored that one of my clients has given me such a lovely gift.

Thank you Kayla for your dear heart, and your kind words….

you have totally made my day!!!

 

Here’s what she sent,

Anyway, let me give you my testimonial first. I know there’s no hurry for this, but Candice, you’ve been such a darling and a big help to me and you really deserve some good feedbacks  I’ll still let you know how everything else is going but here you go:

It was such a great pleasure to work with Candice. She has been the most helpful from the very beginning by understanding life and health conditions as well as assessing your needs. She takes on a holistic approach in helping the client and giving the most appropriate suggestions. The eczema blend is wonderful as it helps in cooling down the “angry” inflammations; the release/opening synergy aids in releasing all your frustrations and keeps worry at bay; the muscle relief blend eases the aches in the muscles without being a pain to your olfactory senses; the blue dolphins blend brings one clarity and focus and it’s great for meditation; the detox blend helps in eliminating water retention for the lower body; and of course, your beautifully made custom blends are really working for my mother and for the family! Candice is one of the best AromaTHERAPIST (she really is one great therapist) out there and her compassion and her willingness to explore and experiment what is the best for the client will sure give her clients the results they want. Five stars to you Candice!

Love and Light

Kayla

New Yellowstar Essentials Flash Website now live!

As you may or may not know, I am a big bargain hunter and love when I find free stuff. I came across wix.com awhile back and have been working on building my own flash website for Yellowstar Essentials since I found them. I’ve never seen such an amazing, or easy to use free website builder. And not only is it free, but super user friendly and fun to experiment with. No matter what type of site you’d like to build, whether you’re a photographer, artist, salesperson, poet, preacher or thief, you can make a fantastic flash website at wix for free. The way they can offer free websites is to place ads on your published site, but it’s inexpensive to upgrade and remove those ads.

See my new FLASH Wix website for Yellowstar Essentials here. Please visit the site and come back to this post to leave me any comments, suggestions or thoughts you might have on the new site, I’d love to hear them!

You can make your own flash website for free at Wix.com, they are amazing!

Get Rid of Acne Naturally With Essential Oils

Best Essential Oils for Acne Treatment thanks to; http://www.naturalnews.com/028374_acne_essential_oils.html

Individual skin types will react differently to essential oils. The process of combining and experimenting with the best essential oil blend may be a trial and error process. Generally, the skin responds well to aromatherapy oils because they heal and nourish the cells and reduce inflammation. Essential oils also have antibacterial and antiseptic properties.

The best essential oils for acne control include lavender, geranium, sandalwood, jasmine, lemon, patchouli, chamomile, rosewood and eucalyptus.

Essential Oil Recipe for Acne

Create a natural gel to treat acne. Combine a quarter of a cup of aloe vera gel with ten to twelve drops of geranium oil, ten drops of lavender oil and seven drops lemon grass oil or tea tree oil. Blend all the oils and gel together thoroughly and apply to blemish areas twice daily after cleaning the skin. Do not use around the eyes.

Safety Precautions

Unlike perfume, essential oils are highly concentrated substances that need to be diluted prior to application to the skin. When buying essential oils, it is important to look at the label closely to see if they are pre-diluted or not. Buy undiluted, pure, organic essential oil and avoid cheap oils as they may be impure, adulterated or distilled with petrochemical solvents which may aggravate the skin instead of healing it.

Good carrier oils for the skin include sweet almond, apricot kernel, carrot oil and avocado, jojoba and hazelnut. To dilute, add ten drops of essential oil to 28 grams (1 ounce) of carrier oil.

Make sure the skin is thoroughly clean and dry before applying oils.

Consult a qualified homeopath if the skin is severely inflamed or not improving after using home remedies.

Additional Tips to Combat Acne

Cut out sugar, processed and refined foods from the diet. Sugar is not food and should not be eaten in its refined form. Eliminating sugar is possibly the best thing an acne sufferer can do to cure his or her acne problem. Cravings should disappear after one week or so of eliminating sugar from the diet.

Sources:

http://www.naturalnews.com/027237_a…

http://naturalmedicine.suite101.com…

Essential Science Publishing (compiled by), Essential Oils Desk Reference, 2nd Edition. USA, Essential Science Publishing, 2001.

 

ALSO SEE MORE SKIN CARE ARTICLES:

 

How to get healthy hair and combat dry or frizzy hair with essential oils

Easy recipes and great tips on beating the frizzies and healthy hair tips.

  • How to Cure Frizzy Hair with Essential Oils

    4/8/2010
    Learn how to combat dry, damaged or frizzy hair with essential oils by using these tips and tricks. Includes recipes, essential oil info. and much more. Never have the frizzies again.
  • How to Use Essential Oils for Healthy Hair

    3/25/2010
    Great tips and the best essential oils to use for getting beautiful hair, whether you have dandruff, dry hair, oily hair or dull hair. Essential oils can also help with lice, flaky scalp and under active sebaceous glands.

Hello world!

Yellowstar*Essentials; Aromatherapy for Mind, Body, Spirit & Home
Yellowstar*Essentials; Aromatherapy for Mind, Body, Spirit & Home

Welcome to my new WordPress.com blog. This blog will mostly deal with the art of Aromatherapy and my business: Yellowstar*Essentials; Custom Aromatherapy for Mind, Body, Spirit & Home. This blog will also deal with other Alternative Healing Therapies and living naturally with tips, recipes and other useful  information on such. I’ve created this site for everyone interested in learning more about alternative therapies for improving all aspects of their lives. Enjoy!

Feel free to ask any questions, add comments, suggestions, or any feedback, it’s all  much appreciated. I’d love to know what you think!

Making Sense of SCENT

Making sense of SCENT

IN THE UNITED STATES, where using scents to heal has moved into the mainstream, the term ­aromatherapy is broadly applied. Scented candles with names such as “Meditation” and “Sensuality” can be found at the checkout stand of the local market, along with spray bottles of scents designed to set a mood with the pump of an atomizer. The aromatherapy category has also come to include bath salts, shampoos, lotions, potpourris, and much more. The multitude of products is nothing new, though; historically, essential oils have been used in a variety of forms, depending on the culture and new discoveries about aromatherapy.

While a large selection is nice, it may be confusing when you’re just beginning to use aromatherapy. To help you be a wise consumer, we offer a little basic background.

The discovery

Aromatherapy is a relatively new term, although the practice of using scents to heal is centuries old and crosses many cultural lines. Ancient Egyptians used scents (incense burners have been found in ancient tombs), as did the early Chinese, who employed scents in civil and religious ceremonies. During times of plague, Europeans carried pomanders made of oranges and cloves to mask odors and fend off diseases.

It wasn’t until the twentieth century, however, that the term aromatherapy actually came about. It refers to a specific form of holistic healing that involves carefully ­inhaling or applying herbal essential oils, which are volatile, aromatic plant compounds. René Gatefossé, a French chemist working in the lab of his family’s perfume business during the 1930s, is credited with coining the term. Gatefossé began researching the healing properties of herbal essential oils when he saw his own hand—burned accidentally while working—heal quickly and without scarring after he plunged it into a bowl of diluted lavender oil. In 1937, he published Aromathérapie detailing his research. During World War II, another Frenchman, Jean Valnet, a medical doctor, used essential oils to treat wounded soldiers, and an Austrian biochemist, Marguerite Maury, introduced the use of essential oils with massage techniques.

Today in France, more than 1,500 doctors have been trained in aromatherapy and prescribe essential oils routinely; in England, aromatherapy is used in hospitals to help patients relax and sleep after surgery.
Aromatherapy as profession

The aim of trained aromatherapists is to work with the body to promote health, not to provide a “silver bullet” cure. Generally speaking, an aromatherapist assesses both symptoms and an individual’s lifestyle—his or her diet, stresses, personal goals, and fears. From there, the aromatherapist determines which oil or blend of oils is appropriate.

Massage forms the major part of the treatment, and some aromatherapists consider the use of essential oils in therapeutic massage as the oils’ most effective purpose. Aromatherapists choose from among more than 400 essential oils as they work and, when preparing a massage oil, blend essential oils with a carrier oil (see the glossary,). As they massage, the oil penetrates the body.

In the United States, no licensing agency for aromatherapists exists, nor does a national standard for certification. If you are seeking an aromatherapist, remember that many holistic health-care practitioners, including herbalists and naturopaths, use essential oils as part of their practice, so they may be able to direct you to an aromatherapist in your area. . Some aromatherapy schools have created their own certification standards, including required coursework and certified hours of practice.

Other applications

“Clinical aromatherapy” refers to the use of essential oils to heal specific conditions. The technique is used by many health-care practitioners, including herbalists and naturopaths. Although not yet wholeheartedly embraced by Western medicine, clinical aromatherapy is based on scientific evidence that, in turn, is grounded in basic anatomy.

When we breathe, odors—volatile molecules that float through the air—fill the nostrils and travel up two narrow chambers to the olfactory epithelium, a receiver that extends from the outside directly into the brain. Odor molecules bind to receptors there, and neurons send messages to the brain’s olfactory bulbs, where other neurons reduce the complexities of odors. Mitral neurons send messages to the limbic system, the source of emotion and memory. Scientists say that some smells cause the limbic system to activate the hypothalamus and pituitary gland to stimulate hormone production; these glands control sex, appetite, and other body functions. Although much research remains to be done to determine the effects of specific essential oils on both mind and body, strong evidence exists to show that they do

Another way of using scent is what some call “environmental aromatherapy.” It refers to diffusing essential oils into the air to enhance living space. The aim of this practice isn’t to mask foul smells but to cleanse the air. Diffusers are usually made of ceramic or glass, with a small container for water that is heated by a candle or electricity. Drops of essential oil are added to the water (the number of drops of essential oil is determined by the size of the room and the intensity of fragrance desired); heat releases volatile essential oil molecules into the atmosphere. Burning incense is a centuries-old method of diffusing essential oils into the air, as is the burning of scented candles.
The pros and cons of doing it yourself

Aromatherapy can be practiced alone if you’re seeking relaxation or gentle invigoration. Diffusing scent into the air, adding herbal oils to your bath, or rubbing a few drops of diluted essential oil into your feet or hands are simple ways to do it yourself. And if you want to learn more, many books and other resources can provide you with good information on how to begin Because essential oils can be toxic if not used properly, consult the “Usage Warnings and Cautions” from my website.

However, for more serious health conditions, consult a trained professional. Asthma, for example, should never be self-treated, and people undergoing chemo­therapy or treatment for serious illnesses such as AIDS shouldn’t try to heal symptoms associated with these conditions without a health-care provider’s guidance. Pregnant women should be especially cautious when trying to decide which essential oils they can use safely, and parents should always consult a health-care provider when considering using essential oils on children.

Scent sense

The best chance for a happy experience with aromatherapy is to choose good-quality products. With the increasing number of products out there, this may sound easier said than done. But a few simple rules of thumb should help.

Keep in mind that not all scents are natural essential oils. Some are synthesized in the laboratory. If an oil is labeled “fragrance,” it’s probably synthetic. A good essential oil will come from a named botanical species and, when appropriate, a named carrier oil. Its aroma will be vigorous and lively, rather than simply strong. Occasionally, essential oils are “extended” by adding alcohol or cheaper vegetable oils, rather than a preferred carrier oil such as jojoba or almond oil or similar. Look for both the botanical name and the carrier oil on the ingredients list of the essential oil bottle or accompanying information. Some essential oils, pure or already blended in carrier oil, come in tiny vials; these products should have ingredient information readily available in the packaging, with a clear description of how the product has been prepared and/or instructions on how to use it and whether you need to dilute the oil with a carrier oil.

Many commercial brands will also include instructions for use. One sampler of six essential oils in small vials, for example, includes specific instructions for using each, such as adding a couple of drops to bathwater or mixing them with an ounce of carrier oil.

Remember that essential oils come from plants, so the aroma of the best oils will vary from year to year because of changes in climate, rainfall, and soil conditions—all of which affect the herb from which the essential oil comes.

Store your oils in their bottles, preferably dark ones, in a cool, dry place. Be sure to keep your essential oils separate from medicines and from solutions that might be affected by the oils’ aromas. Keep caps tightly sealed to avoid evaporation.

It’s important that serious conditions be treated by a qualified health-care practitioner. Essential oils are most commonly used in preparations to relieve aches and pains, encourage relaxation, ease stress, and care for hair and skin. Some, such as the antifungal tea tree oil, can be used to fight minor injuries or irritations; others, such as essential oil of eucalyptus, can be added to a steam to help clear a stuffy head.

Finally, take the sniff test. If you’re a healthy individual who doesn’t have a history of sensitivity but wonder whether a particular essential oil is right for you, put a small drop of the oil onto a cotton ball and sniff to make sure that you find the scent appealing. Don’t inhale right from the bottle—essential oils possess strong aromas and can cause a reaction when sniffed in this way.

GLOSSARY

Carrier oils: As a general rule, herbal essential oils shouldn’t be applied to the skin directly because they are highly concentrated and can sting or otherwise irritate. Instead, essential oils are blended with “carrier oils” to dilute them. The best carrier oils are virgin cold-pressed oils such as almond, walnut, wheatgerm, apricot kernel, and hazelnut. Castor and jojoba oils are also acceptable carrier oils. Essential oils are volatile, so they evaporate quickly when exposed to air but are soluble in carrier oils.

Diffusers:Often made of ceramic or glass, diffusers are used to disperse essential oils into the air. They hold a small container for water, which is heated by a candle or electricity. Drops of essential oil are added to the water; the number of drops of essential oil is determined by the size of the room and the intensity of fragrance desired. Heat releases the volatile essential oil molecules into the atmosphere.

Essential oils: Highly fragrant, concentrated, and potent substances that come from plants and can be irritating to the skin if undiluted. The term can be traced to sixteenth-century alchemists searching for “quintessence,” or the secret of life. Until the early part of the twentieth century, many medicines and personal products such as soaps were made with essential oils.

Perfume: From the Latin per fumare, meaning “through smoke.” Oriental cultures found religious and spiritual connotations in the aromatic smoke of burning herbs; Native Americans burn aromatic herbs to create smoke for their healing ceremonies. Today’s perfumes are largely syntheti

To learn more

BOOKS, ARTICLES, AND OTHER RESOURCES

Gibbons, Boyd. “The Intimate Sense of Smell.” National Geographic 1986, 170(3):324–361.

Green, Mindy. Natural Perfumes: Simple, Sensual, Personal Aromatherapy Recipes. Loveland, Colorado: Interweave Press: In press; due in June 1999.

Kusmerik, Jan, ed. Aromatherapy for the Family: An Introductory Guide to the Use of Holistic Aromatherapy for Harmony and Well-being. London: ­Wigmore, 1997.

Obuchowski, Christa. “Aromatherapy.” In The Whole Mind: The Definitive Guide to Complementary Treatments for Mind, Mood, and Emotion, edited by Lynette Bassman. Novato, California: New World Library, 1998.

Rose, Jeanne, and Susan Earle, eds. The World of Aromatherapy. Berkeley, California: Frog, Ltd., 1996.

The Aromatic Thymes, a quarterly publication. Subscription information: (847) 304-0975.

Tisserand, Robert, and Tony Balacs. Essential Oil Safety. New York: Churchill Livingstone, 1995.

If you’re interested in real essential oils and products made with them, try
Yellowstar*Essentials

Holistic Nutrition; Sources of Vitamins, Minerals & Trace Minerals

Here’s a great list of Holistic Herbal Sources for Natural Nutrition

Herb Sources of Vitamins, Minerals and Trace Minerals
Many herbs are excellent for getting the vitamins and minerals our bodies need
because the body usually digests them easier through plants, much easier
than from fish or animal sources.

Listed below are some herb sources of vitamins, minerals and trace minerals.

VITAMINS
Vitamin A: Alfalfa, Cayenne, Eyebright, Lambs Quarter, Paprika, Red Clover, Violet, Yellow Dock
Vitamin B: Alfalfa, Dulse, Fenugreek, Kelp, Licorice, Saffron
Vitamin C: Bee Pollen, Chickweed, Echinecea, Garlic, Golden Seal, Juniper BerrY, Paprika, Peppermint, Rosehips, Sorrel, Violet, Watercress
Vitamin D: Alfalfa, Dandelion, Red Raspberry, Rosehips, Sarsaparilla, Watercress
Vitamin E: Alfalfa, Burdock, Dandelion, Dong Quai, Kelp, Scullcap, Sesame, Slippery Elm, Watercress
Vitamin G: Fo-ti-tieng
Vitamin K: Alfalfa, Gotu Kola, Shepherd’s Purse
Niacin: Alfalfa, Fenugreek, Parsley Watercress
Vitamin P: (Rutin, Bioflavenoids) Acerola, Paprika

MINERALS
Calcium: Aloe, Cayenne, Chamomile, Fennel, Marshmallow, Sage, White Oak Bark
Cobalt: Dandelion, Horsetail, Juniper Berries, Lobelia, Parsley, Red Clover, White Oak Bark
Iodine: Bladderwrack, Kelp
Iron: Burdock, Chickweed, Ginseng, Hops, Mullein, Nettles, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sarsaparilla, Scullcap, Yellow Dock
Magnesium: Alfalfa, Catnip, Ginger, Gotu Kola, Red Clover, Rosemary, Valerian, Wood Betony
Potassium: Aloe, Cayenne, Fennel, Golden Seal, Parsley, Rosehips, Slippery Elm, Valerian
Zinc: Burdock, Chamomile, Dandelion, Eyebright, Marshmallow, Sarsaparilla

TRACE MINERALS
Alfalfa, Burdock, Dandelion, Kelp, Yellow Dock, Parsley, Red Clover, Rosehips, Sage, Sarsaparilla, Valerian

Hope you find some good use for this info……..

You could prepare them in a number of ways, here’s some examples;

How Do You Prepare Herbs?

Capsule: This is the most popular way most people take their herbs. Some of the reasons: it’s easy, convenient, avoids bitter taste, saves on preparation, and provides an exact regulated dosage to the body.

Decoction: To extract the deeper essences from harder or coarser herbs such as stems, barks, and roots. The herbs are usually simmered uncovered for 10 to 20 minutes until 1/3 of the water has decreased through evaporation, usually one part plant to twenty parts water. Note: for coarser herbs such as Valerian and Burdock, these must be gently simmered in a covered pot to bring out their medicinal properties. Strain before using.

Extracts: Extracts are a highly concentrated alcohol base in liquid form derived from pure herbs. Many people use herbal extracts who are unable to swallow the usual dose. Exact dosages are recommended on individual bottles. This is one of the more convenient ways to take herbs.

Fomentation: A fomentation is an external application of herbs, generally used to treat swellings, pains, cold and flu. To prepare a fomentation, soak a towel or cloth in the desired tea, and apply the towel over the affected area as hot as can be tolerated without burning. Cover the towel with a dry flannel cloth. Repeat as needed.

Infusion: The most common way of preparing herbs. The extraction of the active properties of a substance by steeping or soaking it, usually in water. The usual amount is a teaspoon of leaves, blossoms, or flowers to a cup of boiling water. The water is poured over the herbs, then steeped for 3 to 5 minutes. Strain before using. Honey may be added to taste.

Plaster: A plaster is much like a poultice, but the herbal materials are placed between two pieces of cloth and applied to the affected area. When there is an irritant to the skin, this method will serve to prevent the herb from coming in direct contact with the skin.

Poultice: A poultice is usually used as an antiseptic and to reduce swelling by applying a warm mass of powdered herbs directly to the skin. To prepare, add enough hot water to make a thick paste, then apply directly to the skin. Cover with a hot moist towel and leave on until it cools. Repeat as often as needed.

Salve: A healing or soothing ointment. Use 3 oz. powered herb, 7 oz. cocoa butter, l oz. beeswax, (depending on consistency desired, more beeswax may be needed). Blend all three ingredients together in a covered pot on low heat for 1 to 2 hours. When it is cold, it should be firm and ready to use.

happy herbing!