DIY Beauty Recipe; Darphin Aromatic Cleansing Balm with Rosewood

I love finding expensive beauty products that translate easily into something I can concoct right at home. You’d be surprised at how simple most things are to make yourself…and so much cheaper than buying it already made.

Most formulas are not hard to figure out; i.e. a balm or salve,  a lotion or creme pretty much have the same basic recipes for each, and after a little experimentation and by changing up similar ingredients, you can create your own masterpiece.

I recently came across Darphin’s website and loved their line of products. After looking for the basic ingredients, it’s not difficult to figure out how to concoct most of them in my own kitchen with a few choice ingredients.

Why not be beautiful for less money?

Everyone wants to be beautiful, and most women will spend gads of money to be that way.

If you want to be beautiful, be beautiful!

As Forrest Gump would say, ” Beauty is as beauty does”.

Think beautiful thoughts, act beautifully toward everyone, and look for beauty all around you. This is a great start to be-ing beautiful.

Also, using essential oils in your beauty regiment will do wonders for you, inside and out.

Sometimes just knowing you’re doing something good for the environment by using natural products makes you feel great…

aaaaaannnnnddddddd……….a special treat!

My newest  Recipe for a gorgeous cleansing balm that does wonders for your skin.

and it’s just as good as the $70 cleanser from Paris: (actually better because it won’t cost you that much to make it!)

homemade aromatic beauty cleansing balm

(very like Darphin cleansing balm from Paris $70)

  • 60 ml Marula oil – same as 2 ounces
  • 1 tsp. of beeswax, floral wax or emulsifying wax (depending on how soft you like your balm to be depends on how much wax you use )
  • Neroli essential oil 2 drops (Citrus aurantium)
  • Sage essential oil 1-drop  (Salvia officinalis L)
  • Ylang ylang extra essential oil 1-drop (Cananga odorata)
  • Rosewood essential oil 4-drops (Bois de Rose)
  • Vanilla plantifolia fruit extract-2 drops

Sometimes finding the ingredients is harder than putting them together. Most essential oils are quite easily found online, and some can be found in local health food stores. Just remember that cost usually reflects quality, and thereapeutic grade essential oils are 100 times better than commercial grade for medicinal purposes, and isn’t your skin worth it? Even though the initial costs seem a lot, over time you’ll save wads of cash. You might even want to pool resources with your friends/family and make enough for everyone to share, this saves on costs and is a win, win for everybody.

DIRECTIONS:

Gather ingredients and always have extra glass pyrex measuring cups  in different sizes around with some wooden chopsticks, they are excellent tools.

Just warm the marula oil (or oil of choice, eg. jojoba) with the beeswax, rose wax, jasmine wax or emulisfying wax in a double boiler or pyrex measuring cup until wax is almost melted in short bursts in the microwave. Do not over heat the wax as it can start on fire, even though it doesn’t look melted it gets very hot. Depending on how soft you like your balm to be depends on how much wax you use. It’s better to start with less then add more if you need it.  Stir until completely melted, cool slightly, then add in essential oils. Make sure mixture is not hot when adding essential oils, better that it is cool before adding as heat can destroy essential oil’s potency. After it’s completely set and you find you don’t like the consistency, it’s easy to fix, just warm again and add a little more wax. Pour into containers. Walla! Make sure to mark the date and throw out after a year.

p.s. I’ve found small containers in Walmart , but my favorite container places are listed below. Look for a fill-it-yourself airplane cosmetic travel kit, or in craft stores they sometimes carry tiny containers. If not, there are tons of places online to find them, for instance, ebay, SKS bottles, Specialty Bottles, Essential Supplies, Sunburst Bottle.com, and LotionCrafter to name a few.

Here is the original from Darphin:

Aromatic Cleansing  Balm

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Aromatic Cleansing Balm

with Rosewood

This lavishly-rich Darphin cleansing balm transforms into a light milky emulsion with water to sweep away traces of make-up and impurities, while nourishing skin to relieve tightness and help restore natural radiance. An alternative way to cleanse the face with water through a unique sensory experience.

Key Ingredients:

Marula Oil*, Sauge Officinale, Ylang Ylang and Rosewood* Essential Oils, Vanilla Planifolia Fruit Extract*
*Organic

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Here’s Mountain Rose Herbs version of  lovely facial care products here; including

Classic Rose Facial Oil– a luxurious facial oil comprised of incredibly rich and nourishing oils. It soaks into your skin effortlessly, and may be used either alone or before applying your daily moisturizer or make-up. A fabulous way to pamper your face with pure botanical products, our Classic Rose Facial Oil contains precious ingredients such as Neroli and Helichrysum essential oils, Organic Wild Rosehip Seed oil, and Kukui Nut oil. It assists in preventing wrinkles, re-hydrating the skin, and in the promotion of skin-cell regeneration. Perfect for lightly damaged skin that is dry and mature and needing repair. This is a very concentrated oil, and only a finger tip or two is needed. Contains: Organic Wild Rosehip Seed oil, Kukui nut oil, organic Calendula oil, and a combination of pure essential oils that includes Sandalwood, Neroli, Helichrysum, Frankincense, Carrot Seed and organic Lavender.1 oz bottle with treatment pump

 

Happy 2009! Here’s to Your Health!


Here’s to your health in 2009!

Well, its the beginning of a new year and I’m psyched…I’m always excited in the beginning of anything. Its trying to keep it going and actually finishing something that’s hard to do, for me, anyway.

It seems by all indications that the coming year will be one of the most challenging in a generation. Even more troubling, so many events seem so far beyond our influence that we get overwhelmed and give up before even starting. When it feels like we have no control over our own lives, that’s the time to really focus on the things that we can influence.

Where do we start?
That’s easy…ourselves, and in particular, our health.

Since it is the beginning of a new year, one of our most powerful opportunities is starting over, and after years of setting and failing to keep our resolutions, even tho’ you may think you’ve got problems with disciplining yourself, its much more likely that your aren’t completely clear on what means the most to you.

So grab a pen and make a list of those things that mean the most to you, if they need changing or not, and get a plan going. Make it clear, concise, and simply detailed so nothing can stop you from reaching your goals. Try not to set them too high or you might be setting yourself up for disaster. Just start small, and increase by tiny increments so it won’t be that difficult to keep going.

I found some really great health tips that will help you feel fit and boost your confidence in keeping to your goals.

1. Help boost your fitness with ‘good foods’.
By now, we’ve all heard about “good cholesterol” and “bad cholesterol”. HDL being the “good” that helps reduce the risk of heart disease and limits damage of LDL “bad cholesterol”. To help boost your HDL try a diet high in monounsaturated fats like: olive oil, nuts, avocados and olives. Try pine bark extract also known as pycnogenol as it can lower blood glucose levels, and blood pressure and LDL cholesterol, its also an antioxidant. Don’t forget to add 2/3 cup of fresh berries daily, try it for at least two months ( a Finnish study showed that this help raise HDL and reduces high blood pressure). Also add some grape juice to your diet and it can improve blood flow and lower blood pressure. Grapeseed extract can help to lower cholesterol too. For more energy, try adding whole grains to your diet and how about some chia seeds…Oprah says they’re great! (www.jorgecruise.com, suggested by Dr. Oz)

2. Keep on Moving!
Even if you have to sit at a desk all day, try little exercises that keep you moving when you have a minute. Try neck rolls, arm rotations, leg lifts (also help abs), and foot and ankle rolls. Anything to keep your blood flowing and body pumping! Regular exercise, even if its non-strenuous, can help get you out of a rut and increase metabolism and energy levels. Exercising acts directly on the central nervous system to increase energy and reduce fatigue, while benefiting almost all parts of you, physically, emotionally and spiritually.

3. Try Swimming!
Its been studied and found that low-impact water exercises can ease pain and improve overall health, especially people with hip, knee or joint problems, people with osteoarthritis or back pain. Exercising in water can strengthen and stretch while lightening the body-weight load on joints. Plus, anything in water is more fun!

4. Boost your Metabolism by Sweating!
It’s been said that over 24% of Americans are dealing with metabolic problems that can increase their risk for coronary heart disease and many others. Fast & quick bursts of high intensity exercises, as opposed to longer, moderate exercise, can help reverse metabolic syndrome (per a recent Norwegian study). But before you go for it please consult your doctor before changing your workout and the American Heart Association recommends 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise most days of the week for metabaolic syndrome sufferers.

5. Feeling Depressed?
It’s also been said that low levels of vitamin D (the “sunshine vitamin”) can make you feel down or depressed. Plus, adequate levels of vitamin D are also absolutely vital for calcium absorption and bone health. You can add these foods to your diet to help as well: Omega-3 fatty acids from foods like, salmon, walnuts, flaxseed, scallpos and cod liver oil too. So, don’t forget your vitamin D, your omega-3’s and believe it or not join a social network like Facebook or Linked-In or something of the like. A new study shows that people we don’t even know can make us happier. Happiness is “catching” and most people are influenced by the moods of those around us, we can spread happiness to everyone………like a virus!!! (Only a really good one 🙂

Thanks for reading and I hope you all have a wonderful, peaceful and prosperous new year!

Make Your Own Hair Products Recipes for Naturally Healthy Hair

Looking for a natural alternative to harsh chemicals and colorings?
Want an all natural conditioner?
Have dry hair or split ends?
Tired of limp and dull hair?
Have dandruff and can’t seem to get rid of it?

Try these easy and fun recipes to add some spunk and fun to your hair routine……your hair will love it and everyone will wonder how you got it to look so healthy, shiny and fantastic!

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HAIR COLORING — a natural way to go

TO DARKEN
An equal portions of SAGE and RASPBERRY leaves can be use to darken hair. Use decoction as a hair rinse. For an even darker color use walnut shells.
TO LIGHTEN
Use CHAMOMILE leaves in a decoction, and use as a hair rinse. This will leave your hair refresh with a lustre shine.

TO DARKEN BLONDE HAIR
A pinch of SAFFRON infused in HOT WATER, will also make a good finishing rise to bring out the darker shade of blonde.

BRUNETTE HAIR
Infuse 4 sticks of dried CINNAMON in 100ml (3 1/2 fl oz) of boiling WATER. Leave to cool before using on freshly washed hair. This will leave a trace of spice high lights.

YOGURT HAIR CONDITIONER
For Dry and Fly-away Hair. Just scoop out the yogurt, work into hair and scalp, sit for 5 minutes and rinse..walla!
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INTENSIVE HAIR CONDITIONER
— — A rich, dark, deeply, nutritious conditioner that works well on dry, chemically process hair as it leaves the hair shiny and smooth.
15 ml (1 tbsp) BLACK STRAP MOLASSES
2 EGG YOLKS
50 ml (2 fl oz) AVOCADO or ALMOND OIL
MAKE
STEP 1/ — Beat together the molasses and egg yolks until they form a stiff paste
STEP 2/ — Add the avocado and mix again. Apply to the hair, working the mixture through the hair from the scalp to the ends.
STEP 3/ — Leave on for 20 minutes then wash out, shampooing twice before drying.

HAIR DRY ENDS
50 g (2 oz) COCONUT OIL
50 g (2 oz) COCOA BUTTER
30 ml (2 tbsps) ALMOND OIL
15 drops NEROLI essential
MAKE
STEP 1/ — Melt together the cocoa butter and the coconut oil in a small saucepan, remove from heat and add almond oil
STEP 2/ — When slightly cool add the neroli oil. Rub a little into the ends between washiings. This can can be use as an intensive hair conditoner when needed. Place a little of the mixture at the root of the hair and work your way down. Cover for 20 minutes and wash out.

HAIR POMADE — A natural hair shiner that keeps the hair fresh smelling.

50 ml (2 fl oz) ALMOND OIL
25 ml (1 fl oz) CASTOR OIL
20 drops NEROLI essential oil
10 drops LAVENDER oil
10 drops LEMON oil
MAKE
STEP 1/ — In a jar mix all the oils together and shake well
STEP 2/ — Use by apply a few drops to the hair and brush it in, or sprinkle some onto a bristle brush and brush into the hair.

HOT OIL TREATMENT
50 ml (2 fl oz) OLIVE OIL
10 drops SANDALWOOD essential oil
MAKE
STEP 1/ — Gently warm the olive oil in a small saucepan, and add drops of sandalwood essential oil and stir throughly
STEP 2/ — Apply and massage into the hair. Cover, wrap and leave on for 20 minutes before shampooing twice with a mild shampoo.

HAIR RINSES — These rinses helps restore the correct pH balance to the hair and scalp. They also remove mineral deposits left in the hair by hard water.

HAIR RINSES
NORMAL HAIR
# Fresh ELDERBERRIES make a beautiful shine .
Simmer with water for 15 – 20 minutes, before straining off the juice. Apply to the hair before washing, leave on the hair for 15 minutes then shampoo as normal.
# Add 5 ml (1 tsp) of cider vinegar to your final rinsing water, is also a good way to restore and correct pH balance, leaving your hair gleaming.
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DRY and CHEMICAL PROCESSED HAIR
# Add 5 ml (1 tsp) of domestic BORAX to 3-4 litres (6 pints) of warm water.
# You may also add 5 ml (1 tsp) of CIDER VINEGAR to restore pH balance and 6 drops of CHAMOMILE essential oil to fragrance the hair.
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OILY HAIR
# Make a herbal infusion based on 15 ml (1 tbsp) of chopped fresh MINT leaves, – 15 ml (1 tbsp) of fresh ROSEMARY leaves, and the juice of 1 LEMON mixed with 300 ml (1/2 pint) of HOT WATER. Steep for 15 minutes, strain and use as a final rinse.
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LANK or LIMP HAIR
# Make a herbal infusion with 15 ml (1 tbsp) chopped fresh ROSEMARY mixed with 250 ml (8 fl oz) HOT WATER. Steep for 15 minutes, strain and add the juice of 1 LEMON JUICE 30 ml (2 tbsp) of FLAT BEER. Mix well and apply to the hair as a final rinse after washing.
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BLONDE HAIR
# — Juices of 2 LEMONS mixed with an equal part of WATER. Comb through wet hair after washing, and leave on 15 – 20 minutes before rinsing.
DARK HAIR —
# Make an infusion of 25 g (1 oz) SAGE LEAVES in 3.4 litres (6 pints) of almost boiling water. Steep for 2 hours. Leave on the hair for 20 minutes before rinsing out.
# Mix 1 cup of strong black coffee with the freshly squeeze juice of 1 LEMON. Leave on the hair for 30 minutes after shampooing before rinsing out.
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RED HAIR
# Save the water from BEETROOTS use as a natural plum coloured hair dye. Use sparingly and use gloves to avoid purple hands.# Use a glass of a RED WINE as a final rinse.
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SANDAL & SOAPWORT SHAMPOO
1 oz Chopped SOAPWORT ROOT ,
1 oz Dried CHAMOMILE FLOWERS ,
8 fl oz HOT WATER ,
20 Drops SANDALWOOD ESSENTIAL OIL ,
MIX –Place the chopped soapwort root and camomile flowers in a bowl and pour on the almost boiling water. Stir well. Cover and leave to infuse overnight. In the morning, strain and add the drops of sandalwood oil. To use, wet the hair and massage in a small amount of the mixture. Rinse.

NO WASH SHAMPOO —
A useful way of cleaning the hair. This method works best on short to medium-length hair, by absorbing dirt, sebum and general grime from the scalp and hair.
50 g (2 oz) powder ORRIS ROOTS.
25 g (1 oz) SEMOLINA or GROUND RICE.
10 drops LEMON OIL essential oil.
10 drops NEROLI essential oil.
MAKE
STEP 1/ — In a large bowl mis the orris root and the semolina together.
STEP 2/ –Sprinkle in the essential oils, and stir the mixture well.
STEP 3/ –Transfer to screw top bottle, store and use.
STEP 4/ — Tip head upside down and rub small amounts into the scalp of the hair, and brush outward from the scalp towards the end of the hair. This will leave the hair feeling clean,fresh, soft and sliky.

CUCUMBER SHAVING CREAM —
A soothing cream that helps heal knicks and cuts to the skin. Wonderful for a mans’ bristle beard or a womans’ softer leg hairs.
175 g (6 oz) COCONUT OIL, — 50 ml (2 fl oz) WITCH HAZEL, — 90 ml (6 tbsp) ALMOND OIL, — 1/2 CUCUMBER peeled, — 4 drops LAVENDER essential oil, — 4 drops SANDALWOOD essential oil,
MAKE
STEP 1/ — Melt the coconut oil slowly over a low heat in a small saucepan,
STEP 2/ — Remove from heat, and stir in witch hazel and almond oil,
STEP 3/ — Whizz the cucumber in a blender and then through a fine sieve,
STEP 4/ — Add 15 ml (1 tbsp) of the juice mixture together with the sandalwood and lavender oil,
STEP 5/ — Mix throughly and place in a screw top jar,
STEP 6/ — To use, stick your fingertips into the mixture and apply to the skin. After shaving wipe all traces from the skin with a warm cloth or water. (note : the recipe contains fresh cucumber extract, which means it has a limited time life and should be kept in a very cool place).
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STYLING LOTION —This styling lotion was popular during the war years.

STYLING LOTION
50 g (2 oz) SUGAR
250 ml (8 fl oz) boiling WATER
30 ml (2 tbsps) flat BEER
15 drops LEMON or NEROLI essential oil
MAKE
STEP 1/ — Dissolve the sugar in the boiling water and leave to cool. Add the beer and essential oil
STEP 2/ — Apply to wet or dry hair after shampooing, and set in rollers (left over lotion can be kept in a plastic spray bottle, and use between washings).

HAIR TONIC for THINNING and DANDRUFF hair
1.2 litres (2 pints) strong NETTLE TEA
250 ml (8 fl oz) BIRCH INFUSION
MAKE
STEP 1/ Make a tonic with a handful of young nettle tops 1.2 litres (2 pints) in water for 2 hours. Also make another strong tea 45 ml (3 tbsps) of dried nettle leaves
STEP 2/ –Make an infusion with the birch leaves. Add 15 ml (1 tbsp) to 1 cup of almost boiling water, and leave for 30 minutes.
STEP 3/ — Mix the 2 infusions togther. Strain, and pour into bottles
STEP 4/ Apply to the scalp for 2 -3 times weekly, or use as a final hair rinse. DO NOT WASH OUT.
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try these easy and fun recipes anytime for fabulous hair and you can smile knowing you did it all natural!

thanks for reading!

What Are Therapeutic Grade Essential Oils?

Many companies that sell pure essential oils will tell you that they are THERAPEUTIC GRADE. Most of them (about 98%) are not completely truthful, even though they may be pure, they may not necessarily be therapeutic grade and able to be used internally. So if you are unsure, do not under any circumstances ingest any essential oil unless specified by a professional.

I found this while searching for therapeutic grade from Botanical.com (a fantastic resource for aromatherapy information)

What makes an essential oil therapeutic grade?

You know that essential oils are distilled from plants and that they have powerful healing properties.
You know that they are used by massage therapists, for aromatherapy, and even cooking!

But did you know that only 2 percent of essential oils sold in the United States are true Therapeutic Grade?

Standards have been developed by the Association French Normalization Organization Regulation and adopted by the International Standards Organization to distinguish true Therapeutic Grade essential oils from inferior oils merely used for fragrance. This is a growing concern as demand for essential oils increases due to health-conscious consumers desiring to ward off today’s stressful lifestyles–thus diminishing the supply.

True Therapeutic essential oils are immune-system stimulating, anti-viral, anti-infectious, anti-bacterial, anti-microbial, antiseptic, anti-tumoral and even anti-fungal.

Gas Chromatography Purity Testing
Gas chromatography is the scientific method employed to differentiate imposters from the real McCoys. It measures whether basic components of an essential oil occur in a precise percentage. If only two primary constituents do not meet precise percentages, the oil cannot be AFNOR or ISO certified–although the oil may qualify as Grade A. Gas chromatography can also identify oils that have been synthetically manipulated. At Mountain Rose Herbs, we go the extra mile and request the use of a 50-meter column during gas chromatography testing. Most U.S. labs utilize a 30-meter column, which is adequate for vitamins or minerals–but is certainly not adequate for the chemical complexity of essential oils. An oil’s purity can be affected by myriad environmental factors: geographical region, altitude, climate, soil, growing conditions and harvest method and season. Even the time of day the plant is harvested can affect the oil’s purity! Producing genuine Therapeutic Grade essential oils is indeed a fine art. We do painstaking research at Mountain Rose Herbs, insisting on knowing harvest location, methods utilized to extract the oils, and data reports assuring the oil’s character.

Proper Steam Distillation
The distillation method also affects an essential oil’s purity–and Therapeutic Grade oils mandate preserving as many of the plant’s compounds as possible. Therapeutic Grade essential oils must only be distilled in stainless steel cooking chambers at lowest possible pressure and lowest possible temperature. Extremely high temperature and high pressure, or contact with chemically reactive metals such as copper or aluminum can quickly destroy delicate compounds. At Mountain Rose Herbs, we even insist on knowing how the vats are cleaned!

Every essential oil offered by Mountain Rose Herbs is 100% Pure Therapeutic Grade. The essential oils we stock are obtained by steam distillation of the plant’s volatile oils. And our oils are derived from the first distillation–never the second, third or fourth! The only exception to this rule is our Lavender 40/42, which is a blend of many different lavenders; and absolutes, which are extracted by alcohol. These oils may not suitable for therapeutic aromatherapy, however they are deliciously intoxicating as a fragrance or perfume.

No Additives
The primary components of 98 percent of all essential oils in the market are synthetic. They should not be used for therapeutic applications, and they potentially carry risks. Only pure essential oils should be used for therapeutic purposes. At best, synthetic oils may not produce desired therapeutic results–at worst, they could possibly be toxic.
Mountain Rose Herbs essential oils are 100% pure, natural plant oils. They are free of added water, alcohol, carriers or other diluents. No chemical solvents are added during distillation, and nothing is added to the oil after distillation. A very large selection of oils offered through Mountain Rose Herbs are certified organic through Oregon Tilth Certified Organic. Although organic certification is an intensely painstaking process that a few of our suppliers are still striving to attain, any oils we stock that are not yet certified organic are guaranteed to be free of pesticide and chemical residues. Mountain Rose Herbs essential oils are wholly suitable for aromatherapy, cosmetics, cooking and body application.

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Therapeutic Grade means the essential oil delivers as many of the fragile and original aromatic compound as possible. This starts with choosing the right species of plants, and giving them exactly what they need to thrive, including uncontaminated soil. Also, to guarantee the quality of essential oils, they must be produced equal or to exceed the ISO (International Standards Organization) standards.

Therapeutic grade essential oils are always more expensive than their non-therapeutic grade doubles, so something as simple as checking for the LATIN NAME listed on the label and their price comparison will surely help decipher the dilemma of looking for the right essential oil.

Using Essential Oils for Healthy Hair


Have you ever noticed that some people no matter their age have healthy, shiny hair all the time? Ever wonder their secrets?

Part of aging may be to lose a bit of the young glow and luster in your hair, but using un-natural processes on your hair will accelerate its demise such as overwashing, harsh chemicals, excessive blow drying or heating, and unhealthy diet.

Ok, so we can’t all be perfect,
but here’s a list of the best natural essential oils that can aid in getting that perfect glowing crown of hair you’ve always dreamed of:

Essential Oils for Healthy Hair

Basil: (for Oily hair, & promotes hair growth)

Clary sage (good for All types of hair, great for Dandruff treatment)

Roman chamomile (good for all hair types, esp. dry hair, great for Fine to normal hair. Gives golden highlights, also It’s good for dry and itchy skins, and is a brilliant skin cleanser. It’s also very good for reducing facial puffiness and improving the elasticity of the skin)

Bay (energizing hair tonic),

Jasmine (wonderful for dry hair & skin, nurturing & conditioning),

Juniper Berry (great for all hair types),

Lavender (great hair tonic for all types, esp.Normal hair. Scalp treatment for itchiness, dandruff, and even lice!)

Lemon(great for oily hair and strengthens hair & brittle nails, best on Oily hair also Gives golden highlights; can be used in treatment for dry scalp, dandruff, lice, and underactive sebaceous glands)

Lemon Verbena (great hair tonic),

Linden Blossom(promote hair growth),

May Chang (good for oily skin& hair)

Melissa (useful for greasy skin and hair & reputed to counteract baldness)

Myrrh: great for Dry hair. also a good Treatment for dry scalp, dandruff, lice, and underactive sebaceous glands

Nutmeg (strengthens and a good overall hair tonic)

Patchouli: (good forOily hair. also a good Dandruff treatment)

Peppermint (good for Dry hair. and Promotes hair growth…also A good skin cleanser that helps remove blackheads, peppermint’s cooling action can relieve itching and help with sunburn, also very effective for greasy skin and hair.)

Rose (wonderful for Fine hair. Soothes scalp and emotions too 🙂

Rosemary (great overall hair tonic and best for Oily hair and Dandruff treatment; also promotes hair growth)

Sage (Gives dull hair back its shine)

Tea Tree (wonderful for Oily hair. good Treatment for dry scalp, dandruff, lice, and underactive sebaceous glands. The anti-viral, antiseptic and anti-fungal properties of this oil makes it one of the most useful and popular oils in aromatherapy. It has been known to boost the immune system and is very good for all skin & hair conditions and all skin & hair types)

Ylang-ylang: wonderful aroma and esp. great for Oily hair and a good Dandruff treatment)

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Add a custom blend of these or mix & match for your hair type in macadamia nut or jojoba oil (maximum 10 drops essential oil to 1 ounce of carrier oil) and apply to scalp, or use as an addition to an unscented hair conditioner will improve the condition of the hair and scalp.

Essential Oils for the Different Types of Skin

Your skin is a reflection of your inner vitality. For your skin to be the best it can be, it needs natural nutrients to stimulate cellular activity and to protect against external aggressors. By eating right, getting appropriate fresh air and exercise and using natural ingredients for your skin, you will not only look beautiful, but feel great too!

Essential Oils for Types of Skin

SKINCARE (General) Lavender, rose, rosemary camphor, cypress, geranium, chamomiles, rosewood, geranium essential oils and hydrosols

ACNE: Tea tree, Manuka, Helichrysum, lavender, spike lavender, thyme linalool, rose geranium, tea tree, Petitgrain, grapefruit, sandalwood, Vetiver, mints, basil, German chamomile, atlas Cedarwood, rosewood, Palma Rosa, thyme, Cajeput, Niaouli, Yarrow Hydrosol

ASTRINGENT: Grapefruit, yarrow, rosemary, lime distilled

BLACK HEADS: Coriander, thymus vulgaris, peppermint, lemongrass

CHAPPED/ CRACKED SKIN: Myrrh, patchouli, sandalwood, Vetiver, Cajeput, roman & German chamo, lavender, Calendula infused oil.

CHILBLAINS: Black Pepper, Cinnamon leaf, clove bud, ginger, lavender. (ie, circulatory stimulants to promote warming.)

CLEANSING: Sweet Basil, juniper, lemon, lemongrass, Niaouli, peppermint

COMBINATION SKIN: Geranium, Rosewood, Ylang-ylang, Rose Geranium Hydrosol, Neroli Hydrosol

COUPEROSE (Thread veins, congested capillaries)Lemon, Helichrysum, cypress, rose, lavender, parsley, roman & German chamomiles, geranium, calendula infused oil, Helichrysum or neroli hydrosols.

DEVITALIZED SKIN: Eucalyptus globulous, myrtle, neroli, basil juniper, lemon, lemongrass, Niaouli, peppermint, pine, orange, oregano, rosemary, spearmint, geranium, grapefruit

DRY ACNE: Petitgrain, lavender, spike lavender, clary, rose geranium

DRY SKIN: Carrot seed, Cedarwood, clary, jasmine, geranium, lavender, orange, Palma Rosa, rose, roman chamomile, rosewood, neroli, Petitgrain, Mandarine petitgrain, Vetiver, sandalwood, ylangylang, carrot seed, lavender, rose or neroli hydrosol, Calendula infused oil.

ECZEMA: German Chamomile, Helichrysum, Lavender, Bergamot, Carrot Seed, Atlas Cedarwood, Roman Chamomile, Juniper, Myrrh, Palma Rosa, Patchouli, Sandalwood, Teatree, Yarrow, Ylangylang. Calendula infused oil, Cranberry Seed Oil

HYDRATING: Palma Rosa, sweet orange, Mandarin, tangerine, rose, most hydrosols, esp. Neroli

INFECTIONS: German chamo, Manuka, eucalyptus, lavender, myrrh, roman chamo, rosemary, spikenard, tea tree, thyme linalool, calendula, Palma Rosa, Niaouli, laurel, myrtle, rosewood

INFLAMMATION: Helichrysum, st. johns Wort infusion, carrot seed, Cistus, galbanum German & Roman chamomiles, clary, myrrh, myrtle, rosewood, angelica, yarrow, Helichrysum, Witch hazel or Chamomile Hydrosols

ITCHING: Jasmine, heli, lavender, peppermint, roman chamo, Lavender or Witch Hazel hydrosol

LARGE PORES: Myrtle, lemongrass, rose, Cedarwood

MATURE, AGED SKIN, WRINKLES:Carrot seed, elemi, Cistus, frankincense, galbanum, fennel, geranium, myrrh, patchouli, rose, Clary, rosewood, sages, cypress, fennel, lavender, neroli. also Sea Buckthorn Berry Extract,
Consider Yellowstar*Essentials Mature Skin Elixir: The secret to younger looking skin. A base of Jojoba oil with Sea Buckthorn Berry and Rose Hip Seed extracts added with Neroli, Rose, Roman Chamomile and other wonderful essential oils.

NORMAL SKIN: Atlas Cedarwood, geranium, jasmine, lavender, neroli, roman chamo, rose, rosewood, ylangylang, angelica, all hydrosols

OILY SKIN: Roman & German chamos, Cedarwood, (atlas, red, texas) geranium, Clary, lavender, Ylang-ylang, lemon, peppermint, Niaouli, Cajeput, cypress, calendula infusion, frankincense, patchouli, sandalwood, juniper, Melissa, yarrow, coriander, Petitgrain, lime distilled, grapefruit, thyme linalool, Lavandin, spike lavender, rose

PIMPLES, blemishes: Tea tree, Manuka, Lemon Myrtle, German Chamomile, Helichrysum italicuum, thyme linalool, Cajeput, oregano (spot only) Niaouli, rosemary

PSORIASIS:(extremely difficult to treat) Bergamot, Helichrysum, Cajeput, carrot seed, German or roman chamomile, Lavender, Juniper, Sandalwood, Tea tree Calendula infused oil, Cranberry Seed Oil

PUFFINESS: Oregano, Spanish marjoram, cypress, peppermint, rosemary, fennel, celery, clary, roman chamo

REGENERATION: Frankincense, lavender, neroli, patchouli, rose, rosemary, sandalwood, teatree, Helichrysum, elemi, Vetiver, spikenard, caraway, Palma Rosa, Spanish sage, Clary, lavender, galbanum, myrrh, myrtle, calendula, carrot seed, Cistus,

REVITALIZING BASAL LAYER Carrot seed, Rosewood, Niaouli, tea tree, orange, calendula

ROSACEA: German chamomile, Helichrysum italicuum, rosewood, Helichrysum hydrosol

SENSITIVE SKIN: Roman & German chamomile, rose, Palma Rosa, Helichrysum, neroli, rosewood, carrot, angelica, jasmine, Neroli, Chamomile or Yarrow Hydrosols

SCARS: Helichrysum (in a base of Rose Hip Seed Oil), carrot seed, lavender, petitgrain, galbanum

SKIN TONER: Calendula infused , lemongrass, chamomiles, lavender, neroli, orange, rose, frankincense, Petitgrain, lemon, hydrosols

HERE’S AN EASY 20 MINUTE SKIN CARE ROUTINE

(1). Cleanse face with gentle cleanser to suit skin type, using a cotton ball or a washcloth.

(2). Steam face with head over bowl of steaming hot water for 2 minutes.

(3). Apply moisturizing, purifying face mask.

(4). Bath or shower with a few drops of relaxing essential oil
or invigorating oil in the water. You may also put used herbal tea bags, or cucumber or potato slices over your eyes to remove the bagginess around the eyes. Relax totally for 10 minutes.

(5). Pat body dry with thick warm towels. Apply body lotion all over while skin is still moist. Take special care of feet, knees, elbows, and neck.

(6). Remove mask with warm water and spray or splash face with mineral water.

(7). Apply eye-soothing gel (if you are going out) or night eye cream (if you are going to bed) around eyes and on lids.

(8). Apply moisturizer to face if going out, or your favourite night cream/oil if not.

(9). Apply hand cream and a nail cream around cuticles

Basic Skin Care

A daily routine of skin care requires no more than ten minutes and requires only three simple steps each evening and morning:

(1). Cleanse

(2). Tone

(3). Moisturize

Night care

(1). Cleanse: Remove any makeup with cleansing cream or a natural makeup remover. Wash with mild soap or other cleanser, rinse, and pat dry.

(2). Ton: Apply an acid-containing solution to restore the pH balance and protective shield. For dry skin, use a mild freshener-toner. For oily skin, use an astringent preparation.

(3). Moisturize. Splash on cool water or mist with a spray bottle. Blot, but do not dry completely-moisturizer magic relies more on retaining moisture than in providing it-then smooth on a few drops of your moisturizer.

Day care

(1). Cleanse lightly to remove night time accumulations, refresh your face with a few splashes of water, and pat dry.

(2). Tone by applying a freshener or astringent.

(3). Moisturize around your eyes. If your face is excessively dry, mist or splash with water, blot, and then lightly cover with moisturizer.

 

ALSO SEE MORE SKIN CARE ARTICLES:

 

A Helpful Glossary of Aromatherapy Terms

How many times have you come across a description of a specific essential oil you are interested in only to find that the language used to describe its effects are just as foreign as its uses.
I’ve compiled a list that should help decipher any of those terms you should come across.

Enjoy!

Glossary of Aromatherapy Terms

ABORTIFACIENT: Induces childbirth or premature labor.

AEROPHAGY. An excess of air in the alimentary canal that is relieved through burping or flatulence.

ALTERATIVE: Gradually improves the nutritional state of the body.

ANALGESIC: Relieves or reduces pain.

ANAPHRODISIAC: Reduces sexual desire.

ANESTHETIC: Numbs the nerves and causes a loss of sensation.

ANTHELMINTIC: Expels or kills intestinal worms.

ANTIBACTERIAL: Kills bacteria.

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Reduces or prevents depression.

ANTIDIARRHOEIC: Relieves diarrhea.

ANTIDOTE: Counteracts a poison.

ANTIEMETIC: Counteracts nausea and stops vomiting.

ANTIFUNGAL: Kills fungal infections.

ANTIGALACTAGOGUE: Reduces the production of milk secretion of nursing mothers.

ANTI-INFLAMMATORY. Reduces inflammation.

ANTILITHIC: Prevents formation of stones or calculus.

ANTINEURALGIC: Stops nerve pain.

ANTIPHLOGISTIC: Counteracts, reduces, or prevents inflammation.

ANTIPRURITIC: Relieves or prevents itching.

ANTIPUTRID: Stops putrefaction.

ANTISCLEROTIC: Removes deposits from circulatory vessels.

ANTISCORBUTIC: Preventative for scurvy.

ANTISEPTIC: Inhibits the growth of and kills bacteria.

ANTISPASMODIC: Relieves or prevents spasms, cramps, and convulsions.

ANTISUDORIFIC: Reduces perspiration.

ANTITOXIC: Counteracts poisons.

ANTITUSSIVE: Relieves coughs.

ANTIVIRAL: Weakens or kills viruses.

APERIENT: A gentle purgative of the bowels.

APERITIF: Appitite stimulant.

APHRODISIAC: Arouses sexual desires.

BALSAMIC: Softens phlegm.

BRONCHODILATOR: Expands the spastic bronchial tube.

CALMATIVE: Mild sedative or tranquilizer.

CARDIAC: Stimulates or affects the heart.

CARDIOTONIC: Tones the heart muscle.

CARMINATIVE: Expels gas from the intestines.

CEPHALIC: Problems relating to the head.

CHOLAGOGUE: Increases the flow of bile.

CHOLERETIC: Stimulates the production of bile.

CICATRIZANT: Helps the formation of scar tissue; healing.

COAGULANT: Clots the blood.

CYTOPHYLACTIC: Protects the cells of the organism.

DECONGESTANT: Relieves congestion.

DEMULCENT: Soothes irritated tissue, particularly mucous membranes.

DEPURATIVE: Cleanses and purifies the blood and internal organs.

DETERSIVE: Detergent. Cleanses wounds and sores, and promotes the formation of scar tissue.

DIAPHORETIC: Causes perspiration.

DISINFECTANT: Kills infections and disease producing microorganisms.

DIURETIC: Increases the secretion and elimination of urine.

EMETIC: Induces vomiting.

EMMENAGOGUE: Promotes and regulates menstruation.

EMOLLIENT: Softens the skin, and soothes inflamed and irritated tissues.

ESTROGENIC: Similar to estrogen.

EUPHORIANT: Brings on an exaggerated sense of physical and emotional well-being.

EXPECTORANT: Promotes the discharge of mucous from the lungs and bronchial tubes.

FEBRIFUGE: Reduces or prevents fevers.

FIXATIVE: Holds the scent of a fragrance.

GALACTAGOGUE: Promotes or increases the secretion of milk in nursing mothers.

GERMICIDE: Kills germs.

HALLUCINOGEN: Induces hallucinations-an imagined or false sense of perception.

HEMOSTATIC: Stops hemorrhaging.

HEPATIC: That which acts on the liver.

HYPERTENSOR: Raises the blood pressure.

HYPNOTIC: Induces sleep.

HYPOTENSOR: Lowers the blood pressure.

INSECTICIDE: Kills insects.

LARVICIDE: Kills the larvae of insects.

LAXATIVE: Promotes the elimination from the bowels; a mild purgative.

NERVINE: Calming and soothing to the nervous system.

PARASITICIDE: Kills parasites.

PECTORAL: Affecting the respiratory system.

PURGATIVE: Promotes vigorous elimination from the bowels.

REGENERATOR: Promotes new growth or repair of structures or tissues.

REJUVENATOR: Assists in promoting a youthful appearance.

RELAXANT: Lessens or reduces tension, and produces relaxation.

RESOLVENT: Reduces swellings.

RESTORATIVE: Restores consciousness and/or normal physiological activity.

RUBEFACIENT: A local irritant that reddens the skin.

SEDATIVE: Calms anxiety and promotes drowsiness.

STIMULANT: Excites or quickens an activity in the body.

STOMACHIC: Strengthens, stimulates, and tones the stomach.

SUDORIFIC: Promotes or increases perspiration.

TONIC: Strengthens and revitalizes the body or specific organs.

TRANQUILIZER: Calms the nerves.

VASOCONSTRICTOR: Constricts the blood vessels.

VASODILATOR: Dilates the blood vessels.

VERMIFUGE: Expels intestinal worms.

VULNERARY: Assists healing of wounds and sores by external application

What Are Essential Oils?

The term Essential Oil comes from the Latin word “essentia” meaning “essence” and are volatile, meaning
“to fly” because they are a liquid that quickly becomes gaseous.

Essential Oils are highly concentrated and potent oils extracted from plants, trees, shrubs, flowers and leaves or any other natural component.
Aromatherapy is the process of diffusing pure essential oils, and thus plant essences, which then are absorbed through inhalation and our sense of smell. Smell has an effect on our perceptions and how we react physically, emotionally, and mentally to our surroundings.

Various every day scents remind us of the seasons of the year, our location or situation, potential dangers or happy occasions. Essential oils may effect the physical, mental and emotional aspect of our lives.

Inhalation of essential oils may also effect the release of brain chemicals such as seratonin. Other essential oils have healing qualities when applied topically.

Essential oils are very expensive to produce, some more so than others, due to the labor intensive
process and the quantity of the plant required to produce the oil,
Approximately 400 kg of Thyme would produce 1 kg of essential oil ,
2000 kg of rose petals to make 1kg of Rose oil ,
6 tons of orange blossom to produce 1 kg of Neroli ,
and 4 million Jasmine flowers to produce 1 kg of Jasmine absolute.

Its no wonder some are so very costly.

History of Aromatherapy


HISTORY OF AROMATHERAPY

With origins dating back over 5000 years, Aromatherapy is truly one of the oldest methods of holistic healing.

In the Beginning:
Ancient man was dependent on his surroundings for everything from food, to shelter and clothing. Being so keenly aware of everything around him, and how it could be used for survival, he quickly discovered methods to preserve food and treat ailments through herbs and aromatics.
Aromatherapy, as it is practiced today, began with the Egyptians, who used the method of infusion to extract the oils from aromatic plants which were used for medicinal and cosmetic purposes as well as embalming.
At a similar time, ancient Chinese civilizations were also using some form of aromatics. Shen Nung’s herbal book (dating back to approximately 2700 BC) contains detailed information on over 300 plants and their uses.
SImilarly, the Chinese used aromatics in religious ceremonies, by burning woods and incense to show respect to their Gods – a tradition which is still practiced today. The use of aromatics in China was linked to other ancient therapies such as massage and acupressure.
Aromatherapy has also been used for many centuries in India. Ayurveda, the traditional medical system of India, uses dried and fresh herbs, as well as aromatic massage as important aspects of treatment.
The Greeks acquired most of their medical knowledge from the Egyptians and used it to further their own discoveries. They found that the fragrance of some flowers was stimulating while others had relaxing properties. The use of olive oil as the base oil absorbed the aroma from the herbs or flowers and the perfumed oil was then used for both cosmetic and medicinal purposes.
The Romans learned from the Greeks and became well known for scented baths followed by massage with aromatic oils. The popularity of aromatics led to the establishment of trade routes which allowed the Romans to import “exotic” oils and spices from distant lands such as India and Arabia.
With the decline of the Roman Empire, the use of aromatics faded and the knowledge of their use was virtually lost in Europe during the dark ages.

More History on AROMATHERAPY
The humble beginning of Aromatherapy, which literally means therapy of healing through the sense of smell.

Aromatherapy dates back thousands of years and has been used by most of the ancient civilizations. Most of the stories of ‘the medicine man’ were of professionals schooled in the use of essential oils.

The Chinese civilizations used some form of aromatics dating back to 2700 BC. These historical references contain detailed information on over 300 plants and their uses.
The Chinese also used aromatics in religious ceremonies, a tradition which is still practiced today. The Chinese were also involved in other ancient therapies such as massage and acupressure, hence the term eastern medicine.

Aromatherapy has also been used for many centuries in India. Ayurveda, the traditional medical system of India, uses dried and fresh herbs, as well as aromatic massage as important aspects of treatment.

In ancient Egypt, aromatherapy was a way of life. The essential oils of plants were used during religious rituals raising a higher consciousness or promoting a state of tranquility. Egyptians used the principles of this art in their cooking as well. Specific herbs aided in the digestive process, protected against infection and improving the immune system.

The Greeks acquired most of their medical knowledge from the Egyptians and used it to further their own discoveries. Hypocrites commonly known as the “Father of Medicine” was the first to study this scientifically. The Greeks found that some fragrances were stimulating while others had relaxing properties. Aromatherapy was used for both cosmetic and medicinal purposes.

The Romans learned from the Greeks and became well known for scented baths followed by massage with aromatic oils. With the decline of the Roman Empire, the use of aromatics faded and the knowledge of their use were virtually lost.

One of the few places where the tradition of Aromatherapy continued was in monasteries, where monks used plants from herbal gardens to produce infused oils, herbal teas and medicines. During the Middle Ages, it was discovered that certain aromatic derivatives helped to prevent the spread of infection.

The revival of the use of essential oils is credited to a Persian physician and philosopher known as Avicenna. The Persians initiated a method of extraction known as distillation, and study of the therapeutic use of plants once again became popular. The knowledge of distillation spread and the lost process was once again returned to Europe. By 1200 AD, essential oils were being produced in Germany and were based mainly on herbs and spices brought from Africa and the Far East.

When the conquistadors invaded South America, even more medicinal plants and aromatic oils were discovered, and the wide variety of medicinal plants found in Montezuma’s gardens provided a basis for many new and important remedies and treatments.

Throughout the northern continent, Native American Indians were using aromatic oils and producing their own herbal remedies, which were discovered when settlers began to make their way across the plains of the New World.

Although herbs and aromatics had been used in other world cultures for many centuries, it was not until the 19th century that scientists in Europe and Great Britain began researching the effects of essential oils on humans. It was French chemist, Rene Maurice Gattefosse who discovered the healing powers of lavender oil after burning his hand in his laboratory. He published a book on the anti-microbial effects of the oils in 1937 and the term “Aromatherapy” was born.

The discovery of Penicillin and creation of synthetic drugs has conditioned modern society to readily accept instant cures. In many medical circles, aromatherapy and holistics as a whole are considered “soft” sciences, because cures are less speedy and are difficult to prove scientifically. The proof of the effectiveness of aromatherapy lies in our ancestors, who survived throughout the ages in this hard world equipped with only a natural instincts.

During World War II, the French army surgeon Dr. Jean Valnet used essential oils as antiseptics. Later, Madame Marguerite Maury elevated aromatherapy as a holistic therapy. She started prescribing essential oils as remedy for her patients. She is also credited with the modern use of essential oils in massage. Aromatherapy works the best when used on the mind and body simultaneously.

Even after reading the history of aromatherapy many westerners remain skeptical of this science. Only after they consider the modern uses of aromatherapy do they say “Oh, I get it.”

Some of the more common and mainstream examples of aromatherapy include:

Mentholated vapor rub (to loosen congestion in the chest and breathing passages)
Spa treatments such as the use of Eucalyptus especially in a steam room
Perfumes, Colognes, deodorizers and room fresheners

What Is Aromatherapy?

What is Aromatherapy?

Aromatherapy is the science and art of using naturally extracted aromatic essences from Essential Oils which are highly concentrated and potent extracts in their purest, most condensed state from plants, trees, shrubs, flowers and leaves, seeds, resins, roots, bark, etc. They are like the life-force or life-blood of the plant. They can be extracted by steam distillation, cold pressed or CO2 extracted, they are the plant’s ‘soul’. Essential oils are used to balance the natural harmony in your body, and promote the health of the mind, body & spirit.
It is an art and science which seeks to explore the physiological and psychological and spiritual realm of the individual’s response to aromatic extracts to reduce stress and enhance the individuals healing process. As a holistic medicine, Aromatherapy is both a preventative and an active treatment during illness or disease.

Used for centuries, aromatherapy is known to have been utilized by the Egyptian physician, Imhotep; and Hippocrates. The first person to dub the term “aromatherapy, was French chemist, Rene-Mauric Gattefosse during the 1930s.

Aroma-generating oils are extracted from specific plants to be used therapeutically. Alcohol, oil or lotion is combined with these extracted oils to create the aromatherapy effect. Aromatherapy is when these formulated aromas are then massaged into the skin, inhaled through air disbursement, or poured into bath water for a soothing, calming effect.

Aromatherapy is also utilized for a wide variety of therapeutic treatments including physical and mental conditions, burns, infections, depression, sleep deprivation and high blood pressure.

Although there is little scientific evidence to support claims that aromatherapy is effective in the prevention or remedy of illness, aromatherapy supporters believe the oils encourage stress relief and self-healing. Persons with chronic illnesses or diseases should first consult their health professional before using aromatherapy as some side effects may occur.

Aromatherapy is used in massage, bodywork and other natural healing arts’ modalities; as well as in alternative instructional settings. Known for its aromatic healing abilities, aromatherapy is a natural way to compliment the body’s own self-healing capabilities.

Basics of Aromatherapy

Increasing numbers of people are attempting to return to a lifestyle that is purely holistic and complete, recognizing the importance of combining the mind, body, and spirit in equal measures to achieve optimum health and well-being.
Reputed to be very old, and literally used in almost all civilizations of the world, aromatherapy is one form of holistic healing that is easy to and flexible to be practiced in our daily lives.
Aromatherapy contains organic, natural, unadulterated aromatic extracts, called aromatic essential oils, which come from plant origins. These natural substances display a broad range of therapeutic effects and actions on the body. Many of these essential oils play an important role in our daily lives, each and every moment, and in all occasions. At least one daily consumable that is used by us contains one of these essentials, like many tooth pastes and mouth washes. There are even eatables like some baked goods that are made with essential oils. Aromatherapy, however, refers strictly to the use of essential oils and hydrosols for health purposes and body healing.
Aromatherapy is the art of using the fragrant essential oils derived from plants to treat ailments of the mind and body. The magnificent scent of these oils evokes a variety of different responses by stimulating the olfactory and other sensory organs, which are linked to the areas of the brain which control emotions. It means that these essential oils have a direct bearing on the human constitution, body and mind. A chain of chemical reactions, initiated by this invisible stimulation then takes place, effecting a physical or emotional change in the body.
Aromatherapy is an innovative way to improve the quality of life that incorporates all principles of body and mind. Aromatherapy has already become a part of our lives, although many of us have not associated the name with the actual experience. Each human being has an emotional response, both pleasant and unpleasant, some happy and others sad, to certain scents. So the idea behind aromatherapy is, initially, to find those scents and oils, unique but different for each individual, those evoke positive sensory feelings and emotions. The next step is to introduce those essentials into our daily life to enhance well-being. Natural scents and oils keep us connected to the earth, sparking memories and emotions. They also bring back forgotten memories, emotions and lost luster in our lives.
Pure essential oils are extracted from many parts of the plant (flower, leaf, resin, bark, root, twig, seed, berry, rind and rhizome) and the extracted oils are used to relax, replenish, balance and rejuvenate body, mind and spirit. Aromatherapy is both an art and a science that involves the basic constitution of our body. All these objectives are skillfully achieved by blending required parts of different oils and then creating a balmy complex that is used to create a heavenly experience.
How ever, the results of aromatherapy are very individual specific and vary from person to person. While experts display general agreement about the actions of certain oils, aromatherapy texts vary differently in their descriptions of the properties and characteristics of an essential oil. The basic fact is that no two persons in this world are influenced by the same aromatic oil in exactly the same way and manner. What is more, even the same person can be significantly affected differently by the same oil depending on surroundings, time or mood.
If you need to experience the real magic of these essential oils, you will have to use one of those applications in any part of daily life. Reactions to fragrances are highly individual and specific. Here is small guideline to help you try evaluating some aromas of essential oils:

As you inhale deeply an essential oil for the first time, try and describe the aroma:

* Is it sharp and stinging?
* Is it subtle and smooth
* Is it balanced and tuned?
* Is it light or heavy?
* Is it warming or cooling?
* Is it sweet, spicy, woody, floral, fruity, etc.?

These are some of the basic sensory feeling you can experience on inhaling aromatic oils. Now try and describe how you perceive the aroma:

* Do you like or dislike it?
* Do you associate the aroma with any of your previous personal experiences?
* What emotions do you have that are connected to these experiences? Is it possible to remember them?
* Does the aroma produce those emotions now? Is it repetitive?
* Does the aroma affect your awareness: does it rejuvenate, energize or relax?

Aromatherapy is a science that can not be comprehended so easily; the whole human race has tried to understand its undying mystery since time immemorial. However, its magical properties have always mesmerized us with a sense of awe and suspense.

Essential Aromatherapy
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