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Posts tagged ‘natural perfumes’

DIY Beauty Recipe : 8 Flower Nectar Elixir , Anti-aging serum

Hello beautiful!

people are like the stars...

I hope your day is bright!

This is for you daliajojo, and of course you too –  if you’re one of those that love DIY natural beauty, or just want to make sure what you’re using on your skin is totally good for you, read on for a gorgeous natural skincare recipe for all types of skin.

 Awhile back I wrote about a popular beauty product called Darphin Aromatic Cleansing Balm with Rosewood and how to make it yourself. This is  a follow up to that (plus I received a great comment/question –thanks daliajojo –)

She was wondering about another product from Darphin called: 8 Flower Nectar Elixir.

Here’s their product info for a little background:

darphin 8 flower nectar

A precious youth elixir

Rejuvenating elixir, in the pure tradition of aromatherapy, blends rare and radiance boosting aromatic essences from 8 precious flowers. Opulent formula with anti-oxidants, nourishes and helps smooth the look of lines and wrinkles, firm skin and renew skin suppleness, resilience and youthful radiance, key evidence of truly, younger-looking skin. With an exquisitely feminine, sensual fragrance that could double as a perfume, it is the quintessential holistic beauty care that creates a feeling of overall beauty and well-being while rejuvenating skin’s appearance.

The Result

  • Relieves discomfort due to dryness
  • Nourished, firmer skin
  • Renewed softness and suppleness
  • Youthful-looking and radiant complexion
  • Reduced appearance of lines and wrinkles

99% of the total ingredients from natural origin. Formulated without parabens. Non-comedogenic. Clinically-proven efficiency.

Ingredients:

Essential Oil of Everlasting, Iris, Jasmine, Lavandula Angustifolia (Lavender), Neroli, Patchouli, Rose, Ylang Ylang

Usage:

PM. Apply 5 drops to face and neck. Massage 8 Flower Nectar gently in upward motions from the inner to the outer part of the face.

_____________________________

That’s what they claim, and to be honest, I’ve never used it, but I can tell by the ingredients what this is, and what it can/can’t do.

Funny that they mentioned it could double as a perfume, because it totally is. In fact, I’ve got a natural perfume recipe that is almost the exact thing..except for the Everlasting otherwise known as Immortelle or Helichrysum Italicum essential oil.

Essential Oil of Iris is a rare and rejuvenating delight. Tuscan Iris from Florence is a majestic perennial plant with a rhizome and large spring flowers which give off a sophisticated fragrance. Initially classified as a lily, like all herbaceous plants with large flowers, this flower gained noble status in the XIIth century when it became the emblem of the kings of France. Iris was first used in perfumery in the XVIIth century, its rhizome, an excellent fixative and aromatic reservoir, is ground to obtain a violet-fragranced powder with cleansing properties for the skin and hair. The many benefits of Iris have also been exploited in cosmetics. In particular, this precious oil is derived from its rhizomes: Iris Essential Oil (Concrete). Astringent and moisturizing, Essential Oil of Iris has toning and stimulating properties, a real natural rejuvenating delight.

Tuscan Iris from Florence is a majestic perennial plant with a rhizome and large spring flowers which give off a sophisticated fragrance.
Initially classified as a lily, like all herbaceous plants with large flowers, this flower gained noble status in the XIIth century when it became the emblem of the kings of France.
Iris was first used in perfumery in the XVIIth century, its rhizome, an excellent fixative and aromatic reservoir, is ground to obtain a violet-fragranced powder with cleansing properties for the skin and hair.
Astringent and moisturizing, Essential Oil of Iris has toning and stimulating properties.

And here’s an ingredient that I’ve not mentioned before; Iris essential oil, which might also be called Orris Root Absolute or Concrete. This beautiful rarity is a special addition mostly because of it’s wonderful skin care toning properties. It’s also great as a base note in natural perfumes because of its fixative qualities.

Iris Absolute is beautiful material, the aroma is slightly sweet, earthy, green and violet.

Iris oil is a deeply fascinating and time consuming material to produce. The main producers today are located in China, France and Morocco.

The main species in bulk of production are;

To get the essential oil, the rhizomes/roots (orris root) are collected, washed, surface layer removed, cured and stored for as long as 4 years.

The length of time the orris root is stored is largely responsible for the percentage of the prized constituent – IRONE, the aroma of Irone is a lush green violet accord with excellent tenacity. Most material commercially offered will have a 1%, 8% and 15% Irone content.

Iris Absolute (Iris pallida) Botanical Name: Iris pallida Origin: Morocco

To get the Iris essential oil, or orris root , the rhizomes (roots) are taken out of storage, blitzed, until material resembles a starchy pulp. This is then steam distilled to produce essential oil and due to the chemistry containing myristic acid, so the material hardens up very quickly – resembling a waxy concrete and this is the reason so many people refer to the essential oil as Iris Essential Oil, or Iris Butter.

Then to get Iris Absolute the Iris Butter/Essential oil is alcohol washed to remove the myristic acid and the oil left is vacuum distilled to get the absolute oil. Although now quite rare, Iris Absolute with a content of 80% Irone or more is still produced, but the current starting price is 70’000GBP/105’000USD per kilo.!!

Click here at Oshadhi to get an understanding of how they price their essential oils. This is how a good company should price their essential oils.

Places I’ve found to buy pure Iris essential oil or orris root concrete butter:

RECIPE for 8 flower nectar elixir:

This makes approx. 0.5 oz (15ml) of product.

And making this at home is so much easier than you might think.

The hardest part is getting all the ingredients. They are quite expensive, but you’ll be able to make them go a very long way,  and include your close friends and family too. so it’s totally worth it.

But one thing they don’t mention in their ingredients list is the carrier oil. Most likely they have used essential oils diluted in jojoba since this carrier is closest to the natural oils in our skin.

List of ingredients: Essential Oils of:

that’s it….well, almost. Just make sure that you’re using jojoba diluted essential oils. You never want to use straight (or undiluted) essential oils on your skin. With the exception of lavender or tea tree.

Treat Essential Oils With Respect

Treat essential oils with the same care that you treat medicines. You don’t need to be afraid or avoid essential oils and I’m certainly not trying to scare anyone out of enjoying all the benefits that aromatherapy offers. They can be an amazing blessing within a holistic lifestyle. Do remember, however, that when working with essential oils, less is more.

Dilute your essential oils prior to use on the skin and avoid the oils that are more likely to cause irritation and sensitization. When using an essential oil for the first time, do a skin patch test. You can learn how to do a skin patch test by reading AromaWeb’s Aromatherapy Safety article.

Add all drops to a pretty glass bottle and use in the evenings before bed and after cleansing your face. I use a 1 oz (30ml) serum bottle, but if you want it filled to the very top, use a 1/2 oz (0.5 oz) or 15 ml bottle with glass eye dropper.

How to get Radiant Skin

Essential Oils for the Different Types of SkinNow for those that are concerned about wrinkles or want an anti-aging serum the recipe’s essential oils are wonderful, but I would add the following for extra benefits:

GREAT ADDITIONS for anti-aging effects: Frankincense, Sandalwood, Myrrh, and Carrot seed oil,

for sensitive skin use Frankincense, Myrrh, Lavender, and Roman Chamomile, you may want to use Neroli too in a 2% dilution (or about 12 drops pure e.o. to 1 oz carrier).

Excellent carriers like Rosehip seed oil, jojoba, argan, tamanu (aka; inophyllum calophyllum), evening primrose, avocado, olive, sesame, sunflower, centella (gotu kola) and kukui nut oils are perfect for mature skin.

Always get enough water, sleep, and good nutrition for a glow that starts on the inside!

Start with a base of jojoba oil and add the oils suited to your skin type.  For example, dry skin likes jojoba + Argan , Evening Primrose, and Rose Hip Seed oils. I love to add a couple Vitamin E capsules (use a needle to make a hole in the capsule and squeeze to empty the liquid inside) to every recipe.  If you have acne-prone skin, you could create a combination of jojoba and tamanu oil.  Got combination skin?  Try jojoba, grapeseed and argan with Vitamin E.  It’s all about finding what works for your skin.

It may take a bit of experimentation to find just the right combination for your personal skin type.

Start with an 80% ratio of jojoba and 20% of another oil specific for your skin type.  You can adjust this ratio as needed.  Several carrier oils can be combined to get the perfect combination.

And quality does matter.  I recommend buying the best quality oils that you can find.  Your skin is your biggest organ, and everything you put on it absorbs directly into your bloodstream.  The best oils are cold-pressed, pure, and unrefined oil with no additives.

Resources and more reading:

how to dilute essential oils; http://www.aromaweb.com/articles/dilutingessentialoils.asp

Rejuvinating face mask recipe; https://yellowstaressentials.wordpress.com/2013/11/20/diy-rejuvenating-face-mask-recipe/

http://www.savorylotus.com/7-best-carrier-oils-for-radiant-skin/

Darphin Aromatic Cleansing Balm with Rosewood and how to make it yourself.

dry skin winter anti-aging facial cream

Iris pallida,

Iris germanica

Iris florentina.

Must-Haves Aromatherapy Books:

Perfume and Flavor Materials of Natural Origin, Steffen Arctander, self-published, Elizabeth, NJ, 1960.

The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils, Julia Lawless, Element Books, Dorset, UK, 1995.

375 Essential Oils and Hydrosols, Jeanne Rose.

Essential Aromatherapy: A Pocket Guide to Essential Oils & Aromatherapy, Worwood & Worwood.

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Natural Perfume Notes: Suspect Sniffs – Pleasing Aromas Harbor Hidden Dangers

had to share this great post by new awakenings mag about more benefits of natural perfumes vs synthetics:

Pleasing Aromas Harbor Hidden Dangers

A special aroma may be pleasing to the senses and psyche, but some perfume fragrances contain dangerous synthetic and toxic ingredients that can enter the body through the skin and lungs. Scientists at the Hospital General Universitario de Valencia, in Spain, found that about one in every 10 people will consequently suffer allergic reactions that include itchy, scaly, discolored, painful skin and asthma attacks. The European Union Scientific Committee on Cosmetic and Non-Food Products warns against their damage to the immune and endocrine systems, and Greenpeace cautions that the harmful ingredients can enter ecosystems.

read the rest of the article here; Suspect Sniffs – Pleasing Aromas Harbor Hidden Dangers.

you may also be interested in: more about natural perfumes here

https://yellowstaressentials.wordpress.com/2013/02/12/great-point-about-natural-perfumes/

great point about natural perfumes

Natural perfumes are 100 times better than their synthetic counterparts, for a multitude of reasons. But it’s easy to see why they are getting more use these days as so many of us are concerned about our ever-increasing toxic environments.

One thing you might not have known and is a great point about natural perfumes is a comment by Ananda from Amrita Aromatherapy about wearing a natural perfume: (one of her lovely perfumes is called SWOON see it here on poppyswap)

Depending on your body chemistry, how much you apply, and your activities while you wear it, it will evolve and unfold on your skin over the course of 2-4 hours. Natural perfumes usually wear close to the skin and are not meant to enter a room before you – they are meant to be your intimate affirmation and personal, sensual ritual.

Natural Perfume can be applied to the pulse points, navel, and

hair as often as you desire.

So true!

Check out this cool video of how to make natural perfumes:

Have you ever tried wearing natural perfume? If so, I’d love to hear what you thought of it and if you’d wear it again.

great list of links for natural perfumers

If you love making natural perfumes, or are just interested in the essential oils,  flowers, resins and plants involved in the process, you may find these links (from WhiteLotus aromatics) worth a gander: (photo – natural perfumery (aromantic.co.uk)

 

Also, see this post for more links and recommended books.

notes on diluting essential oils for perfumes

As Robin Lander from Simpler’s Botanicals states, “Creating your own fragrances is a playful art, requiring little more than intuition, imagination, a passion for aroma, and attention to a few simple guidelines. There are no absolute rules as to which oils blend well together, so feel free to experiment! But remember, your blend will be greatly enhanced by using the highest quality pure plant essential oils you can find.”

I couldn’t agree more, but one thing to keep in mind before even beginning your perfume playtime is to always, always dilute your essential oils before using them in a blend. Essential oils are super concentrated substances, and most don’t even have a beautiful aroma right out of the bottle. Most will open up and become the beautiful scents they are ONLY when highly diluted. I like to use either jojoba, or fractionated coconut oil as they both have little to no scent, and help the essential oil last longer.

Take jasmine, for instance; a popular essential oil in many perfumes. Jasmine in it’s purely concentrated form is highly floral to a point that it’s almost cloying, while putting off a dizzying and narcotic act upon the nervous system in that form, and will only give up it’s beautiful melange of notes after it is highly diluted.  Same goes for rose, neroli, and most other essential oils you might want to use in a perfume blend.

From: PERFUMES AND COSMETICS
BY GEORGE WILLIAM ASKINSON, Fifth Edition, 1923

Perfumes or scents, however, exert not only an agreeable impression on the olfactory organ, but their effect extends to the entire nervous system, which they stimulate; when used in excess, they are apt to cause headache in sensitive persons; the laborers in the chemical factories where these substances are produced on a large scale, occasionally even suffer by reason of their stimulating action on the nerves.

For this reason perfumes should never be employed otherwise than in a very dilute condition; this necessity arises from a peculiarity of the odorous substances which when concentrated and pure have by no means pleasant smell and become fragrant only when highly diluted.

Oil of roses, of orange flowers or of jasmine in fact nearly all aromatic substances have an almost disagreeable odor when concentrate; only in an extremely dilute state they yield those delightful scents which we admire so much in the blossoms from which they are derived.

Aromaweb suggests, (which I agree completely with) that aromatic blending for the sheer pleasure of the aroma is a combination of creativity and science. When using a blend created primarily for its fragrance, therapeutic benefit can also occur. The focus of the blend, however, is on the final aroma, not its therapeutic properties.

Safety precautions should be followed for any type of blending, including for aromatic blending. For instance, you would still want to be extremely careful when using Bergamot because of its phototoxic properties and still avoid using all hazardous oils and all oils that are contraindicated for conditions that you have. (Link to Bergaptene Free Bergamot essential oil for sale on Amazon)

Blending Tips

  • When creating a new blend, start out small with a total number of drops of either 5, 10, 20 or 25 drops. 25 drops should be the most that you start with. By starting small, you waste less oil in your blending experiments.
  • Start creating your blend by only using essential oils, absolutes or CO2s. After you have designed the blend, then you can dilute it by adding carrier oils, alcohol, etc. If you hate the blend you created, you have then not wasted any carrier oils or alcohol.
  • Keep a notebook that lists each oil that you used with the number of drops used for each oil. When the creative juices flow, it is easy to get carried away and later forget the exact recipe for your blend; one drop too much or too little of even one oil can drastically change the aroma of your blend. When you find that perfect blend, you want to be able to reduplicate it, and it’s near impossible if you didn’t take notes! If you are especially ambitious, it’s also a wise idea to note the vendor name of the oil that you used as the aroma and quality of oils do vary between vendors (even with the same vendor, the aroma of oils can vary from batch to batch, due to crop fluctuations and resourcing).
  • To store your beautiful creations, perfume sample bottles and 2ml amber “shortie” bottles are very inexpensive and can often be purchased from aromatherapy vendors and glass bottle companies.
  • Be sure to label your blends clearly. If you don’t have enough room to specify exactly what your blend is, label it with a number that corresponds to a number in your notebook.
  • Start off your blending experiments by creating blends that are made up in the following ratio (you do not have to be exact – this is just a guideline to get you started): 30% of the oils are top notes, 50% are middle notes, and 20% are base notes. See the chart above to find out what oils belong to each category.
  • Some oils are much stronger than others, especially the absolutes and CO2s. Study oils you wish to use in a given blend and observe the oils that have the strongest aromas. Unless you want those oils to dominate the blend, you will want to use dramatically less of the stronger oils in your blend.
  • To learn more about the strength of oils, it is useful to experiment. Begin by adding one drop of a selected essential oil to 4 drops carrier oil. This will result in a 20% dilution. Smell it and study the aroma. To obtain a 10% dilution, add 5 more drops of carrier oil. Smell it, study the aroma again, then repeat as desired. This can help educate you on the characteristics and strengths of each essential oil at various dilution ratios.
  • After creating your blend, allow it to sit for a few days before deciding if you love or hate it. The constituents (natural chemicals) contained within the oils will get cozy with each other and the aroma can change, usually rounding out a bit.

See their page here for more information on different notes (such as top, middle, and base notes, as well as many other helpful tips and notes on blending essential oils into perfumes).

About aging and diluting aromatic blends:

When you think you have the blend you like make sure to age your perfume before adding any other carriers or alcohol. Allow the blend to age at least a week or more before adding them to your chosen carrier oils. Usually, a 10% – 15% dilution of essential oil to carrier oil is appropriate for perfume applications and 5 – 15 drops of blend per ounce of carrier oil for healing massage blends. If you don’t immediately love your creation, be patient. Blends undergo great transformations as they age, and over time your ‘mistake’ could evolve into an aromatic treasure.

Link to 2 oz. amber bottles w/ droppers@Amazon

Links and a Helpful List of Books for Natural Perfumery

I love my natural perfumery group. They are so helpful and chock full of useful info… I was looking up something and saw this post today for a newbie and thought this would really be beneficial for those who are interested in the wonders of natural botanicals and creating scent blends with them…

Books
The Scent Trail by Celia Lyttelton
Perfume and Flavor Materials of Natural Origin– Arctander ( This book is wicked pricey)
The Art of Perfumery by Septimus Piesse
The Rogue Perfumer by Dr. Bobbie Kelley ( This is a book by the perfumer of Paragon Perfumes, not entirely natural)
The Secret of Scent (science and history of smell) by Luca Turin
375 Essential Oils and Hydrosols by Jeanne Rose

Links/Info sites
http://bojensen. net/  one of my fav sites, it goes into the chemical makeup of different botanical ingredients

http://hausofwaft. com/generalized- aromatics- and-ingredients- list/  a very basic list of things used in aromatics

http://www.youtube. com/watch? v=VJuR9dmRH5Y  Boris the Perfumer ( Wonderful late perfumer Alec Lawless)

http://www.youtube. com/watch? v=KwVcFczU6i4

http://www.youtube. com/watch? v=BUj6jpnXh3I& feature=relmfu  Alec Lawless on the Adulteration of essential oils, this is a 3 part interview

http://www.youtube. com/watch? v=jbRFmIx3Vpo& feature=channel& list=UL  This a BBC documentary on perfume, I think its in about10 parts,very interesting.

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