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Posts tagged ‘natural perfume’

DIY Beauty Recipe : 8 Flower Nectar Elixir , Anti-aging serum

Hello beautiful!

people are like the stars...

I hope your day is bright!

This is for you daliajojo, and of course you too –  if you’re one of those that love DIY natural beauty, or just want to make sure what you’re using on your skin is totally good for you, read on for a gorgeous natural skincare recipe for all types of skin.

 Awhile back I wrote about a popular beauty product called Darphin Aromatic Cleansing Balm with Rosewood and how to make it yourself. This is  a follow up to that (plus I received a great comment/question –thanks daliajojo –)

She was wondering about another product from Darphin called: 8 Flower Nectar Elixir.

Here’s their product info for a little background:

darphin 8 flower nectar

A precious youth elixir

Rejuvenating elixir, in the pure tradition of aromatherapy, blends rare and radiance boosting aromatic essences from 8 precious flowers. Opulent formula with anti-oxidants, nourishes and helps smooth the look of lines and wrinkles, firm skin and renew skin suppleness, resilience and youthful radiance, key evidence of truly, younger-looking skin. With an exquisitely feminine, sensual fragrance that could double as a perfume, it is the quintessential holistic beauty care that creates a feeling of overall beauty and well-being while rejuvenating skin’s appearance.

The Result

  • Relieves discomfort due to dryness
  • Nourished, firmer skin
  • Renewed softness and suppleness
  • Youthful-looking and radiant complexion
  • Reduced appearance of lines and wrinkles

99% of the total ingredients from natural origin. Formulated without parabens. Non-comedogenic. Clinically-proven efficiency.

Ingredients:

Essential Oil of Everlasting, Iris, Jasmine, Lavandula Angustifolia (Lavender), Neroli, Patchouli, Rose, Ylang Ylang

Usage:

PM. Apply 5 drops to face and neck. Massage 8 Flower Nectar gently in upward motions from the inner to the outer part of the face.

_____________________________

That’s what they claim, and to be honest, I’ve never used it, but I can tell by the ingredients what this is, and what it can/can’t do.

Funny that they mentioned it could double as a perfume, because it totally is. In fact, I’ve got a natural perfume recipe that is almost the exact thing..except for the Everlasting otherwise known as Immortelle or Helichrysum Italicum essential oil.

Essential Oil of Iris is a rare and rejuvenating delight. Tuscan Iris from Florence is a majestic perennial plant with a rhizome and large spring flowers which give off a sophisticated fragrance. Initially classified as a lily, like all herbaceous plants with large flowers, this flower gained noble status in the XIIth century when it became the emblem of the kings of France. Iris was first used in perfumery in the XVIIth century, its rhizome, an excellent fixative and aromatic reservoir, is ground to obtain a violet-fragranced powder with cleansing properties for the skin and hair. The many benefits of Iris have also been exploited in cosmetics. In particular, this precious oil is derived from its rhizomes: Iris Essential Oil (Concrete). Astringent and moisturizing, Essential Oil of Iris has toning and stimulating properties, a real natural rejuvenating delight.

Tuscan Iris from Florence is a majestic perennial plant with a rhizome and large spring flowers which give off a sophisticated fragrance.
Initially classified as a lily, like all herbaceous plants with large flowers, this flower gained noble status in the XIIth century when it became the emblem of the kings of France.
Iris was first used in perfumery in the XVIIth century, its rhizome, an excellent fixative and aromatic reservoir, is ground to obtain a violet-fragranced powder with cleansing properties for the skin and hair.
Astringent and moisturizing, Essential Oil of Iris has toning and stimulating properties.

And here’s an ingredient that I’ve not mentioned before; Iris essential oil, which might also be called Orris Root Absolute or Concrete. This beautiful rarity is a special addition mostly because of it’s wonderful skin care toning properties. It’s also great as a base note in natural perfumes because of its fixative qualities.

Iris Absolute is beautiful material, the aroma is slightly sweet, earthy, green and violet.

Iris oil is a deeply fascinating and time consuming material to produce. The main producers today are located in China, France and Morocco.

The main species in bulk of production are;

To get the essential oil, the rhizomes/roots (orris root) are collected, washed, surface layer removed, cured and stored for as long as 4 years.

The length of time the orris root is stored is largely responsible for the percentage of the prized constituent – IRONE, the aroma of Irone is a lush green violet accord with excellent tenacity. Most material commercially offered will have a 1%, 8% and 15% Irone content.

Iris Absolute (Iris pallida) Botanical Name: Iris pallida Origin: Morocco

To get the Iris essential oil, or orris root , the rhizomes (roots) are taken out of storage, blitzed, until material resembles a starchy pulp. This is then steam distilled to produce essential oil and due to the chemistry containing myristic acid, so the material hardens up very quickly – resembling a waxy concrete and this is the reason so many people refer to the essential oil as Iris Essential Oil, or Iris Butter.

Then to get Iris Absolute the Iris Butter/Essential oil is alcohol washed to remove the myristic acid and the oil left is vacuum distilled to get the absolute oil. Although now quite rare, Iris Absolute with a content of 80% Irone or more is still produced, but the current starting price is 70’000GBP/105’000USD per kilo.!!

Click here at Oshadhi to get an understanding of how they price their essential oils. This is how a good company should price their essential oils.

Places I’ve found to buy pure Iris essential oil or orris root concrete butter:

RECIPE for 8 flower nectar elixir:

This makes approx. 0.5 oz (15ml) of product.

And making this at home is so much easier than you might think.

The hardest part is getting all the ingredients. They are quite expensive, but you’ll be able to make them go a very long way,  and include your close friends and family too. so it’s totally worth it.

But one thing they don’t mention in their ingredients list is the carrier oil. Most likely they have used essential oils diluted in jojoba since this carrier is closest to the natural oils in our skin.

List of ingredients: Essential Oils of:

that’s it….well, almost. Just make sure that you’re using jojoba diluted essential oils. You never want to use straight (or undiluted) essential oils on your skin. With the exception of lavender or tea tree.

Treat Essential Oils With Respect

Treat essential oils with the same care that you treat medicines. You don’t need to be afraid or avoid essential oils and I’m certainly not trying to scare anyone out of enjoying all the benefits that aromatherapy offers. They can be an amazing blessing within a holistic lifestyle. Do remember, however, that when working with essential oils, less is more.

Dilute your essential oils prior to use on the skin and avoid the oils that are more likely to cause irritation and sensitization. When using an essential oil for the first time, do a skin patch test. You can learn how to do a skin patch test by reading AromaWeb’s Aromatherapy Safety article.

Add all drops to a pretty glass bottle and use in the evenings before bed and after cleansing your face. I use a 1 oz (30ml) serum bottle, but if you want it filled to the very top, use a 1/2 oz (0.5 oz) or 15 ml bottle with glass eye dropper.

How to get Radiant Skin

Essential Oils for the Different Types of SkinNow for those that are concerned about wrinkles or want an anti-aging serum the recipe’s essential oils are wonderful, but I would add the following for extra benefits:

GREAT ADDITIONS for anti-aging effects: Frankincense, Sandalwood, Myrrh, and Carrot seed oil,

for sensitive skin use Frankincense, Myrrh, Lavender, and Roman Chamomile, you may want to use Neroli too in a 2% dilution (or about 12 drops pure e.o. to 1 oz carrier).

Excellent carriers like Rosehip seed oil, jojoba, argan, tamanu (aka; inophyllum calophyllum), evening primrose, avocado, olive, sesame, sunflower, centella (gotu kola) and kukui nut oils are perfect for mature skin.

Always get enough water, sleep, and good nutrition for a glow that starts on the inside!

Start with a base of jojoba oil and add the oils suited to your skin type.  For example, dry skin likes jojoba + Argan , Evening Primrose, and Rose Hip Seed oils. I love to add a couple Vitamin E capsules (use a needle to make a hole in the capsule and squeeze to empty the liquid inside) to every recipe.  If you have acne-prone skin, you could create a combination of jojoba and tamanu oil.  Got combination skin?  Try jojoba, grapeseed and argan with Vitamin E.  It’s all about finding what works for your skin.

It may take a bit of experimentation to find just the right combination for your personal skin type.

Start with an 80% ratio of jojoba and 20% of another oil specific for your skin type.  You can adjust this ratio as needed.  Several carrier oils can be combined to get the perfect combination.

And quality does matter.  I recommend buying the best quality oils that you can find.  Your skin is your biggest organ, and everything you put on it absorbs directly into your bloodstream.  The best oils are cold-pressed, pure, and unrefined oil with no additives.

Resources and more reading:

how to dilute essential oils; http://www.aromaweb.com/articles/dilutingessentialoils.asp

Rejuvinating face mask recipe; https://yellowstaressentials.wordpress.com/2013/11/20/diy-rejuvenating-face-mask-recipe/

http://www.savorylotus.com/7-best-carrier-oils-for-radiant-skin/

Darphin Aromatic Cleansing Balm with Rosewood and how to make it yourself.

dry skin winter anti-aging facial cream

Iris pallida,

Iris germanica

Iris florentina.

Must-Haves Aromatherapy Books:

Perfume and Flavor Materials of Natural Origin, Steffen Arctander, self-published, Elizabeth, NJ, 1960.

The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils, Julia Lawless, Element Books, Dorset, UK, 1995.

375 Essential Oils and Hydrosols, Jeanne Rose.

Essential Aromatherapy: A Pocket Guide to Essential Oils & Aromatherapy, Worwood & Worwood.

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Aside

musical language of perfumery

Creating perfumes is definitely an art. Just as a master musician composes a symphony, so too does a perfumer create a harmonious blend combinations with ‘musical notes’ that are pleasing to the senses.

Although I truly adore natural perfumes, (I won’t use synthetics – they are an attack on my senses and is the main reason I started my whole essential oil journey), certain popular fragrances can appeal to me at times, but I still won’t buy them and choose to create my own with naturals.

Throughout history there has been much written about how compositions are created using musical characteristics to describe them.  Each essential oil has a ‘note’, whether a top note that dissipates quickly (like lemon or lime), or a heart note (middle note- like rose or jasmine), or a base note that holds a blend together (like sandalwood or patchouli). Did you ever wonder how that came about?

The art of perfumery goes back centuries, and many chemists/scientists and geniuses have used musical inspirations to describe their uses and combinations. I found this great blog post from ‘perfumeconcubine’ and had to share it to give a little more insight:

Aromatic Symphony

The musical language lends numerous expressions and phrases to the art of perfumery. Some of its terminology helps us to understand how perfumes are composed from conception to conclusion.
Charles Piesse, a French perfumer from the 19th century, was one of the first to equate music to perfume.  He devised a system to identify perfume ingredients by classifying fragrances according to musical notes. Piesse relates odors to the octaves of the musical scale and theorized that scents influence olfactory nerves in the same manner that sounds influence the auditory nerves. Although his method of classification ultimately failed, musical expressions continue to be a mainstay in the art of perfumery.

Just as a musician harmonizes notes to create chords, a perfumer must be proficient in harmonizing scents into fragrant combinations. Thus, the creation of perfume should be pleasing to both the mind and senses. The experience should emulate the composition of an intricate piece of music. For example, a three-part fugue with the olfactory notes being the key signature, the usage of notes identifying the individual elements of the arrangement – as well as describing the perfume and how it smells as it evaporates from the skin. Therefore, it is imperative that the perfumer has vast knowledge of raw materials, and a clear understanding of how they evolve and change.

Dry Down – what does it mean when describing a scent? It’s the “lifetime” of a fragrance; the phases a fragrance goes through when worn.

(LOVE THIS!!!  <3)

____________The process is initiated with the master seated at the fragrance organ, his surroundings being an array of aromatics. There, the inhalation of exotic scents, along with the distinguishing of olfactory notes, takes place.  Imagine this phase as the prelude, an extravaganza of brilliant notes coming together in unison.  Bear in mind that notes show more than the aspect of the perfume’s range, they also can represent a particular quality or tone that reflects the mood of the composition.

The first movement begins with what is referred to as top notes. Typically citrus odors, bright and bursting with freshness and, on occasion, is considered sharp. Although quite expressive, they seem to maintain lightness, as well as lending to the initial impression of the composition. They are also the most volatile of the notes, being the first to evaporate. The dissipation of the top notes quickly transitions us into the second movement or middle notes.

Middle notes are predominately floral aromas, and as they unfold they exhibit the true heart of the composition, adding fullness, roundness, and complexity. Middle notes, can be either heady and exotic or delicate and subdued. They emerge as the perfume warms on the skin, escorting us gracefully into the third movement or the base notes.

Base notes — originating from woods, resins, and spices — are rich, warm and exotic. They are viscous, having a consistency between solid and liquid. And they also have a dual function and are held in high esteem for their fixative qualities. That anchors the composition, completing the structural unity necessary to achieve harmony while, at the same time, adding longevity. The base notes emerge slowly, almost as if the movement is marked adagio, bringing the symphony to its entirety. Base notes are the last to surface but have the longest duration, or in musical terms sustainability. Base notes leave their clinging impression behind by embracing us for hours, thus completing the fragrance evolution.

Not every symphony will be vivacious or sparkle with brilliance. Depending on the composer, the concert may be inferior, lacking life, or absent of character, with tonality being non-existent. On the other hand, a symphony composed by a true virtuoso will be exquisite, giving an accurate exposition on his thematic idea. Every note being smooth and harmonic as they progressively transition from one phase to another, accompanying us gracefully through the fragrance evolution.

An aromatic symphony is a classical perfume, bearing semblance to a beautiful musical composition, one of consonance, as simple notes mingle and produce harmonious blends.

Great book about Charles Piesse’s workThe art of perfumery and the methods of obtaining the odours of plants; the growth and general flower farm system of raising fragrant herbs; with … dentifrices, cosmetics, perfumed soap, etc

Other great reading for natural perfumery; Anya’s Garden Perfumes

MORE; natural perfumery books

WIKIPEDIA perfume: HOW to Describe a perfume:

The most practical way to start describing a perfume is according to the elements of the fragrance notes of the scent or the “family” it belongs to, all of which affect the overall impression of a perfume from first application to the last lingering hint of scent.[13][14]

Fragrance notes

Main article: Note (perfumery)

Perfume is described in a musical metaphor as having three sets of notes, making the harmonious scent accord. The notes unfold over time, with the immediate impression of the top note leading to the deeper middle notes, and the base notes gradually appearing as the final stage. These notes are created carefully with knowledge of the evaporation process of the perfume.

  • Top notes: The scents that are perceived immediately on application of a perfume. Top notes consist of small, light molecules that evaporate quickly. They form a person’s initial impression of a perfume and thus are very important in the selling of a perfume. Also called the head notes.
  • Middle notes: The scent of a perfume that emerges just prior to the dissipation of the top note. The middle note compounds form the “heart” or main body of a perfume and act to mask the often unpleasant initial impression of base notes, which become more pleasant with time. They are also called the heart notes.
  • Base notes: The scent of a perfume that appears close to the departure of the middle notes. The base and middle notes together are the main theme of a perfume. Base notes bring depth and solidity to a perfume. Compounds of this class of scents are typically rich and “deep” and are usually not perceived until 30 minutes after application.

The scents in the top and middle notes are influenced by the base notes, as well the scents of the base notes will be altered by the type of fragrance materials used as middle notes. Manufacturers of perfumes usually publish perfume notes and typically they present it as fragrance pyramid, with the components listed in imaginative and abstract terms.

Fragrance wheel

Fragrance Wheel perfume classification chart, ver. 1983

Main article: Fragrance wheel

The Fragrance wheel is a relatively new classification method that is widely used in retail and in the fragrance industry. The method was created in 1983 by Michael Edwards, a consultant in the perfume industry, who designed his own scheme of fragrance classification. The new scheme was created in order to simplify fragrance classification and naming scheme, as well as to show the relationships between each of the individual classes.[15]

The five standard families consist of Floral, Oriental, Woody, Fougère, and Fresh, with the former four families being more “classic” while the latter consisting of newer bright and clean smelling citrus and oceanic fragrances that have arrived due to improvements in fragrance technology. Each of the families are in turn divided into sub-groups and arranged around a wheel.

Mountain Rose Herbs. A herbs, health and harmony c

Don’t Let Them Outlaw Natural Perfumes!

I found this on the Natural Perfumers Guild

website and thought it was important enough to share….

If you enjoy using/purchasing or making and selling natural perfumes, you should definitely read this:

And just to let you know…I will be participating in any way I can as well, so that means this blog and my site yellowstaressentials.com I’ll try to keep on top of this issue to help keep you informed.

Outlaw Perfume Project – A Natural Perfumers Guild Artistic Statement

Message from Guild President Anya McCoy:

Soon after I started blogging in 2006, I began to write of the incredibly restrictive and unreasonable “guidelines” of the International Fragrance Association, and the resultant laws from the European Union that effectively killed perfumery. True, they also ranked some synthetics as “dangerous” (brain disruptions), but the list of naturals, which had been used for centuries without major problems, was overwhelming. I rarely bother to blog about these issues anymore. I discovered I was the ONLY perfumer doing so at the time, and it cast a bit of a bitter pall over my blog. I’d rather be blogging about the beauty and luxury of naturals, so here I am. I passed the ball on to other bloggers!

Nine bloggers will be participating, and you can find their links at the end of this post. They’re all insightful, intelligent and passionate about perfumery. Their readership far outstrips mine, and the Outlaw Perfume project is a great way for them to spread the word about this abomination against natural aromatics. They also get to sample the gorgeous perfumes created by the Natural Perfumers Guild members (disclaimer: I’m the president of the Guild) and offer a giveaway of the Outlaw Perfume on their blogs.

I’ve always been someone who challenges authority. In the 60’s, I marched for civil rights, against the Vietnam War, and for women’s rights. This IFRA and EU-driven blacklisting agenda against naturals must stop. Readers, please remember that they’re stomping on *your* rights to choose what you put on or in your body. Anyone can use common sense and not put perfume on skin that is exposed to sunlight, so, there, the photo-sensitization problem of some of the citruses, angelica root, etc., solved 😉

Think you may be a bit sensitized to oakmoss? Wear the perfume in your hair, or on your clothing, or in a perfume jewelry piece. I’m taking photos of vinaigrettes and perfume lockets that I’ll share later this week. They’re a beautiful addition to a jewelry wardrobe, and serve a double purpose of gently releasing your perfume. It’s all about our choice, and not bowing down to nanny-state governments. How simple if a warning label, some perfume dabbed in your hair, or on your clothing, or in a piece of pretty jewelry solves this problem. Or, if you’re a daring outlaw like us natural perfumers – wear it on your skin!

Participating Perfumers:

http://lordsjester.com www.bioscent.info http://anyasgarden.com www.providenceperfume.com www.dshperfumes.com http://tambela.com http://www.etsy.com/shop/wingandprayerperfume www.JoAnneBassett.com http://artemisiaperfume.com

Participating Bloggers:

http://waftbycarol.blogspot.com/ http://www.examiner.com/x-4780-Portland-Fragrance-Examiner http://fragrancebelleslettres.blogspot.com http://thenonblonde.blogspot.com/ http://indieperfumes.blogspot.com/ http://cafleurebon.com http://olfactarama.blogspot.com/ http://perfumeshrine.blogspot.comhttp://perfumesmellingthings.blogspot.com

Guild Perfumer’s Blogs:

http://anyasgarden.blogspot.com http://providenceperfume.blogspot.com http://dshnotebook.wordpress.com/ http://lordsjester.wordpress.com http://aromaticjourneys.blogspot.com

We Welcome All Those Who Love Natural Fragrance

The Natural Perfumers Guild is dedicated to perfumes and all fragrance products that use botanical extracts and natural animal essences solely as their scent source. No synthetic aromatics are used in creating the perfumes, and no diethyl phtlate or other synthetic extenders are in any of our perfumes. We create and celebrate all fragrance products that use botanically-based aromatics, as we are artisans dedicated to the alchemy and hands-on methods of time-honored traditions or natural perfumery. These liquid beauties are sometimes also known as botanical perfumes. There are Guild members who do not use animal essences, only botanics in their perfumes, and they may call themselves botanial perfumers.

Natural perfumery an art as old as civilization and as new as the latest harvest of roses in Turkey, jasmine in Egypt and lemons in Florida. It connects us to the ancient temples of Egypt, the fragrant mosques of the Middle East, the native peoples of the Americas and the temples of India, China and the Far East. People have loved the scent of beautifully fragrant plant materials since time immemorial, and we are reviving that art with a 21st Century sensibility.

We gather natural plant extracts from around the world – and some from our own gardens – and craft perfumes, incenses, body balms, room fresheners and much more.

The Guild was founded by Mandy Aftel, author of Essence and Alchemy and the nose of Aftelier Perfumes, in 2003, and closed later that year. In 2006, ownership of the Guild was handed over to Anya McCoy, the perfumer of Anya’s Garden Perfumes. This move was made in recognition of Anya’s ability to manage and guide thousands of members on the Yahoo Natural Perfumery group. Anya forges the intent and direction of the Guild and strives to build this nascent art into a cultural and artistic force, most recently through the Mystery of Musk and Outlaw Perfume projects.

Built upon the goal of nurturing the art of natural perfumery through education, legislative efforts and networking among members, the Guild is an organization that welcomes all who love natural aromatics.

We’re a consortium of international perfumers, associates, suppliers and enthusiasts united on the Internet, and when lucky enough, we meet in person and share our stories and dreams of the future of natural perfumery.

The public is demanding a new paradigm in perfumery, one that gives them the option of obtaining quality perfumes made only with pure and natural aromatics and the Guild artisans meet that requirement and desire to create new, exciting fragrances free of synthetics.
See the rest of it here, and sign up for the Natural Perfumers Guild newsletter to keep informed.

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