All about aromatherapy, alternative medicine & the healing arts, beauty, & the mind-body-spirit and home. Visit us on FB: https://www.facebook.com/yellowstar.aromatherapy

Posts tagged ‘glossary’

Perfumery and Aromatherapy Glossary of Words – Making Sense of Scents

The aromatherapy and perfume industries have adopted a language of thier own.And sometimes trying to decipher the terms seems a daunting task when you have no idea what they mean by and absolute, or a chypre or a tenatious scent. So when you’re buying fragrances, you need to understand what the salesperson is saying when the perfume’s being described to you.

Below you will find some of the more commonly-used words in the aromatherapy and perfuming world…this glossary will help you make wise and informed choices.

 

  • · Absolute
    An absolute is the most potent aromatic product made from a base product. It differs from an essential oil in that it’s produced through an extraction process that uses volatile solvents. The extracted solid material is then combined with alcohol to produce the absolute. Absolutes are also darker in color than essential oils.
    · Accord
    An accord is a blend of two fragrances to produce a third unique fragrance, with neither of the original two fragrances being detectable. You can compare it to the combining of basic colors, like yellow and blue to make green. When you look at green, you don’t see the yellow or blue – just green. And when you smell an accord, you only smell one distinct fragrance, not either of the original fragrances that were combined.
    · Aftershave
    Aftershave is a men’s toiletry product that could be classified as a cosmetic or a fragrance. It comes in the form of a lotion, a gel, or a balm. After shaving, men apply it for one or more of a few reasons: It makes the skin look smoother; it soothes sensitive skin; it closes the pores after shaving; and it serves as a light cologne. The cologne usually isn’t strong enough to interfere with the man’s primary cologne. In fact, there are some designer fragrances who’ve introduced aftershave that complements their fragrances.
    · Alcohol
    Alcohol is used in the process of making perfume. It’s job is to carry the perfume extracts, and release them when the perfume is dispensed.
    · Aldehyde
    An aldehyde is a highly-reactive chemical compound made by oxidizing different alcohols to make resins and organic acids.
    · Aldehydic
    Aldehydic comes from the Greek phrase “anointing oil”. In perfumery, it refers to a certain fatty fragrance, and can be found in perfumes such as Chanel No 5.
    · Amber
    Amber is a term used to describe a heavy, full-bodied, warm fragrance.
    · Animalic
    Animalic is a term used to describe what would be a bad odor on its own, like a faecal smell. But perfumers have found that, in very small dilutions, and in clever combinations with other ingredients, animalic scents can be quite pleasant. A perfume that uses animalic notes is Civet Absolute.
    · Anosmia
    Anosmia is the inability to smell. You can have either full or partial Anosmia. If you have full Anosmia, you can’t smell anything. If you have partial Anosmia, there are only certain things you can’t smell.
    · Apocrine sweat glands
    Apocrine sweat glands are those that give you your unique sexual and body scent. It can interfere with or influence the fragrance in perfumes you wear.
    · Aromachology
    Aromachology is a fairly new science – one of the new alternative therapies. It’s associated with fragrances and their psychological benefits and/or effects. It was developed by Annette Green, a member of the Fragrance Foundation, in the late 70s. An example of an aromachology-inspired perfume is Shiseido’s Relaxing, introduced in 1997.
    · Aromatic
    Aromatic, in perfumery, refers to the rich scents of Balsamic notes.
    · Aromatherapy
    Aromatherapy is a term created by R.M. Gattefosse, a French chemist. It’s the art and science, although not a medically-approved one, of using aromatic substances, usually essential oils, to cure common ailments. It’s also popular as a stress reliever.
    · Attar
    Attar, or Otto, as it is sometimes referred, comes from an old Persian word meaning “to smell sweet”. It’s an extremely expensive essential oil made from the Bulgarian rose.
    · Balsam
    Balsam is a sticky resin that leaks out of trees when they’re cut. It’s used in perfume to create a woody scent.
    · Balsamic
    Balsamic notes are found in some perfumes. They have a warm scent, and are popular in the Oriental group of fragrances, like Shalimar, Opium and Obsession.
    · Body
    Body is a term used to refer to the main theme or heart of a perfume. It can also be used to refer to a perfume that’s well-rounded or full.
    · Bouquet
    Not surprisingly, bouquet is a term used to describe a mixture of floral notes.
    · Camphoraceous
    Camphoraceous refers to a Eucalyptus-like fragrance that’s found in the scent of certain herbs, like rosemary and lavandin.
    · Carrier oil
    Carrier oil is just what it sounds like – an oil base that carries essential oils. Basically, they’re mixed together to make massage oils and skin care products. Some examples are apricot kernel, grape seed, jojoba and sweet almond.
    · Chypre
    Chypre is an ancient perfume, originally combining fresh citrus notes with Oakmoss and some animalic notes. About 100 years ago, Coty made a Chypre perfume, which has been currently followed up with similar fragrances, like Miss Dior and Aramis. Today, the most common use of Chypres, because of their leather character, is in men’s fragrances.
    · Citrus
    Citrus notes are fresh scents, similar to the smell of fresh oranges, lemons, grapefruit, bergamot and pomello.
    · Classic
    Classic fragrances are – well, they’re classic. They survive the years, remaining popular. They have depth, with a 3-10% floral absolute, much stronger than most modern fragrances.
    · Cloying
    Cloying is a term used to describe a fragrance that’s sickly sweet and unpleasantly clinging.
    · Cologne
    Cologne is a city in Germany where the very first modern perfume, as we now know it, was produced. That was about 300 years ago, and it was called Eau de Cologne – a perfume made basically from citrus oils. If you want a classic brand of Eau de Cologne that’s about 200 years old, try Farina Gegenuber or 4711. Today, cologne is a word usually used to describe men’s fragrances.
    · Compound
    Compound is the term used in perfumery to describe the concentrated fragrance mixture before it’s diluted to make the finished perfume.
    · Concrete
    Concrete is the term used in perfumery to refer to the hard, waxy substance that’s left after the solvent has been applied to the raw material, and has evaporated.
    · Depth
    Depth refers to whether a scent is complex, sophisticated, rich or full-bodied.
    · Diffuser
    A diffuser is an aromatherapy device that gently dispenses essential oils into the air.
    · Dry down
    Dry down is what perfumers refer to as the final phase of a fragrance. It’s sometimes referred to as the bottom line or bottom note – the character of the fragrance that remains a few hours after applying the perfume.
    · Eau de Cologne (EDC)
    Eau de Cologne is the term used today to refer to a perfume solution with around a 3% compound in an oil and water base. It’s the lightest of perfumes and, therefore the least expensive.
    · Eau de Parfum (EDP)
    Eau de Parfum is a perfume solution with a 10-15% compound.
    · Eau de Toilette (EDT)
    Eau de Toilette is a perfume solution with a 3-8% compound in an oil and water base.
    · Earthy
    Earthy is a term used by perfumers to describe notes that resemble earth, dirt, moss, and other such scents.
    · Essential oil
    Essential oils are the concentrated essences that are the product of the distillation or expression of plants, including flowers, leaves, wood and grass.
    · Evanescent
    Evanescent is a word used to describe a fragrance that disappears quickly.
    · Expression
    Expression, or cold press extraction, is the process of removing essential oils from plant material, like citrus peel, consisting of forcing the oil from the plant material.
    · Extraction
    Extraction is the process of removing essential oils from plant material using solvents, which are then evaporated, leaving just the oil.
    · Extract
    An extract is a perfume that has 15-45% compound in an alcohol base.
    · Fixative
    A fixative is an ingredient added to perfume to make it last longer, similar to a preservative.
    · Flat
    A flat fragrance is like a flat beer – no body, no lift, uninteresting.
    · Floral
    Floral is a fragrance scent that resembles flowers, and is usually described as smooth or natural.
    · Flowery
    Flowery is a fragrance with flower or flower petal notes.
    · Forest blends
    Forest blend perfumes have earthy, woodsy, natural notes.
    · Fresh
    Fresh is a term often used to describe citrus or green notes, found in light perfumes.
    · Fruity
    Fruity is a term used to describe a fragrance that has fruit scents, but not citrus fruits. It’s usually a kind of sweet-sour scent, like apples, strawberries, pineapples or bananas.
    · Full-bodied
    Full-bodied refers to a fragrance that’s rich and has depth.
    · Fungal
    Fungal is used to describe a fragrance that has notes of mushrooms, fungus, or mould, like oakmoss.
    · Fragrance
    Fragrance is often used interchangeably with perfume, but they’re not quite the same thing – fragrance is the scent of the perfume; perfume is the product itself.
    · Green
    Green is a fragrance note that resembles freshly cut grass, or leaves, and it gives the perfume a vibrant scent.
    · Gums
    Gums are the resins that are extracted from the bark, branches and leaves of trees.
    · Harmonious
    Harmonious is a word used by perfumers to describe a fragrance that’s well mixed and well balanced.
    · Heady
    Heady fragrances make you feel light-headed, exhilarated or stimulated.
    · Heart
    Heart refers to the main theme, or the middle of the perfume.
    · Heavy
    Heavy refers to a fragrance that’s potent and not vibrant, and is often described as sweet or balsamic.
    · Herbaceous
    Herbaceous refers to a fragrance that’s natural and hay-like, maybe even a little therapeutic. Some examples are chamomile, lavender, rosemary and sage.
    · Honey
    Honey is a term used to describe a fragrance that has a very sweet, almost medicinal scent – very heavy and syrupy.
    · Jasmine
    Jasmine is an absolute used in perfume. There are two kinds – European, and South Asian.
    · Lift
    Lift is a term used to describe a fragrance that has life and brilliance.
    · Light
    Light refers to a fragrance that’s not heavy – go figure!
    · Middle notes
    The middle notes are the fragrances that make up the main theme or the heart of a perfume. They usually appear about 10-20 minutes after the perfume is applied.
    · Modern
    A modern perfume would be the opposite of a classic perfume – usually using new aroma chemicals, rather than natural materials. It usually has a light fragrance.
    · Mossy
    Mossy refers to fragrances that have earthy notes, like the forest floor.
    · Muguet
    Muguet is the French word for Lily of the Valley, one of the most popular florals used in perfumery.
    · Narcotic
    Narcotic is the term used to describe the fragrance of some floral notes, said to be intoxicating.
    · Note
    Note can refer to a single scent in a perfume, or it may be used to refer to one of the three stages of evaporation of a perfume, which are the top note, the middle note and the bottom note, the top being the first to evaporate.
    · Oriental
    Oriental is a term that, in the past, was used to describe fragrances with balsamic, vanilla, oakmoss and animalic notes, but more recently has been used to describe fragrances that are heavy and full-bodied. Some examples of oriental perfumes are Opium, Obsession, Shalimar, and Samsara.
    · Perfume
    Perfume, or parfum, as it is sometimes called, is the highest concentration of oils, with 20-50% compound, which makes it last longer than others.
    · Perfumer
    Perfumer is a multi-use word, used to describe a person who either creates, mixes, or sells perfume.
    · Powdery
    Powdery is a word used to describe a fragrance produced by a combination of a heavy, sweet or woody note with a citrus, fruit or light green note.
    · Resinoids
    Resinoids are extracts from gums or resins that are used as fixatives in perfumes.
    · Rose
    Rose is used to describe one of the most common notes in perfumery which, of course, comes from rose petals.
    · Spicy
    Spicy describes fragrance notes that have a warm or hot character, as opposed to the neutral or cool Herbal notes. Their scent is pungent, similar to those of cinnamon, or clove and thyme oil.
    · Stability
    Stability refers to how long a fragrance lasts, either in the bottle with the other ingredients, or exposed to heat, light or air.
    · Strength
    The strength of a fragrance refers to how intense its scent is.
    · Substantivity
    Substantivity refers to how long a fragrance lasts on a particular surface, and how it’s affected by temperature, humidity, and other such conditions.
    · Sweet
    The sweetness of a fragrance can be described in several ways – it can be used to refer to a vanilla sweetness, a floral sweetness, or a fruity sweetness. Whichever one is used, it refers to a rich, sweet taste.
    · Synthetic
    Synthetic is a term that’s used to refer to a substance that’s man-made, with the specific purpose of duplicating a particular scent. Synthetics are sometimes better than natural materials because their properties can be controlled, but for therapeutic use NEVER use a synthetic!
    · Tenacious
    A tenacious fragrance will last a long time, keeping it’s main theme or scent.
    · Thin
    A thin fragrance lacks body or depth.
    · Top note
    The top note of a perfume is the fragrance that you initially smell. Top notes are usually light, citrus notes.
    · Velvety
    A velvety fragrance is smooth and mellow, without any harsh notes.
    · Woody
    Woody fragrances are those that have forest notes, like freshly cut dry wood such as cedarwood and sandalwood.

I sincerely hope this list helps describe any perfumery or aromatic questions you may have about their definitions. If there is one not listed here, please email me and I’ll add it to the list…
thanks and happy scenting!

Essential Oils and other Natural Tips to Aid in the Prevention of H1N1, Swine Flu and Flu Viruses

I thought this was important enough to share…

Everyone should read this information on preventing the flu, swine flu, and H1N1 by using essential oils and following a few simple steps.

I think it’s so important to take good care of our own health and be responsible for our own well-being. By taking these simple steps, it could save your life!

1.      Wash your hands

2.      Use hand sanitizer

3.      Use a home/car/room diffuser

4.      Eat right, exercise and take a multivitamin

5.      Vitamin C

6.      Zinc

7.      Vitamin E

8.      Tea Tree steam inhalation

9.      Use these foods;

“(PRWEB) May 10, 2006 — A Biology teacher from Australia, named Stephen Jones, has done extensive research into the H5N1 virus and compiled a list of natural foods that are effective against it and listed others that are detrimental.”

Helpful foods:

  • ·        Garlic
  • ·        Green Tea
  • ·        Apple Juice
  • ·        Cranberry Juice
  • ·        St. John’s Wort tea

Detrimental foods:

  • Dairy products (increase mucous production)
  • Bananas – increases mucous production.
  • Honey
  • Chocolate
  • Echinacea
  • Kimchi
  • Elderberry juice
  • Micro Algae (Chlorella and Spirulina)

References:

REad the rest of the article at; http://the-health-gazette.com/496/natural-antivirals/

Resources;

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/ (search using Pubmed ID number listed after each food)

_______________________________________

Also read this email from a Nature’s Gift Aromatherapy Blog;

Health Care Provider seeking Swine Flu (H1N1) guidance

Thought I would post (with permission, of course) an email exchange from earlier this week. (The title of this post is the subject line of the Email.)

Marge,So sorry to bother you again.
My husband and I are both health care providers, and both actually on the “front line” in emergency medicine. We also both work in emergency management. As such, we are both considered in the “high risk” group for both seasonal flu and H1N1. We also have 3 children, ages 17, 12 and 2 who will be considered in the “high risk” group for H1N1.

Because the peak for H1N1 is predicted for October, and the vaccine will be available in limited quantities in mid to late October, I am sincerely concerned about protecting my family.

I’ve attempted research in this area and have come across many essential oils for the prevention of H1N1 – Ravensara, Ravintsara, Cinnamon, Lavendar, Clove, etc., but am not sure the best way to use them to protect my family (diffuser, massage, inhaler,etc.). I have read that rubbing Ravensara on the soles of the feet every morning and evening will afford some protection, but am concerned about using it on the 2 year old and using it long term. I am also not sure of the safest oils to use to protect my 2 year old.

I have purchased Ravensara, Ravintsara, Thyme Linalol, Eucalyptus smithii, and the Flu Foil and Germ Beater blends, but any guidance you could give in their use, use of any additional oils or therapy, and duration of use would be greatly appreciated.

-”Because I suspect others might be pondering the use of Essential Oils to protect themselves and their families against the promised H1N1 epidemic, I thought sharing my comments in public might be appropriate.
……
First… as a health care provider, I’m sure you know that I can neither give advice, nor even suggest that the essential oils we make available could have any possible therapeutic benefits. To do so would leave me open to the FDA charging me with selling “unregistered drugs”…

having said that.

For the two year old I would definitely use the ravINTsara, not ravensara.. What I would do for your whole family (I’ve seen case studies where this was used in schools and the absenteeism rate plummeted)… I’d blend ravintsara into aloe vera gel…as high as a 10% dilution… 5% for the 2 year old, and use that as “hand cream” three times a day.

For the whole family… I would diffuse Flu Foil… or even use inhalers on a regular basis (ie, every hour or so, for you and your hubbie…or between patients.) I’d reserve the Euc Smithii for ‘cold symptoms’… it’s the best decongestant for the little one…and effective for all of you… best by diffusion, or a drop on the pillow case.

I’d use the Germbeater as a room spray, or occasionally diffuse it… keeping in mind that it is truly aimed at bacteria, rather than viruses..virii?? specifically.”

Ravintsara, Ravensara, Palma Rosa, Eucalyptus and Lavender are the oils used in Nature’s Gift FLU FOIL, but you could very well make your own blend by purchasing the separate oils.

And as for the Germbeater blend that includes the following essential oils:

Lemon Myrtle, touched with Tea Tree and Lemon scented Tea Tree, Ravensara for its antiviral potential, Cedarwood, Pine, Lemon Eucalyptus for molds and spores, and the powerfully germ killing Cinnamon Bark. This is not a blend to use on the skin, it will burn, and contains a known sensitizer. It is designed for the diffuser, or to be diluted into a room and countertop spray.

-cont.

“The thyme linalol would be a gentle and safe antibacterial for the little one, as well as the whole family. I suspect that, had you not already purchased it, you might find Thyme Thujanol a bit more effective, but you have the linalol on hand, so I would go with that.

I’d look at alternating the ravensara and ravintsara for the older members of the family…either by diffusion, or, as mentioned, in the Aloe gel… it is my personal belief that it would be a more effective anti viral than the antibacterial soaps you probably use in your practices.

I’d think about diffusing flu foil and germ beater alternately…

and I’d look at using one oil or blend for 3 or 4 days, then alternate with another… ie, perhaps ravensara for 3 days, then flu foil, then back again. I think switching off is better than always using the same oils.

hope some of this helps… you and yours are most definitely on the front lines and more at risk than the general population. GOOD LUCK… and I hope to hear come winter that you all made it through ‘flu season’ unscathed!!!

as you can tell, I’m not much on the theory that the oils should be applied to the soles of the feet OH..and neither cinnamon nor cloves should be used topically. We have them both in our germbeater spice blend… but I’d not use them other than in a room spray or a blend for diffusion.

hope all of this helps.

I would LOVE to post your question and my rambling answer on our blog with your permission…”

Posted by Marge at 11:16 PM

Labels: anti-viral essential oils, flu prevention, H1N1 virus, swine flu

1 comments:

Carol said…

This is such good advice. I am a second grade teacher and my principal will not let me use any oils in my classroom. I was hoping to be able to diffuse some blends. He is afraid someone will have a reaction and even if it’s not caused by an essential oil blend a parent might think it is and sue us. So, I can only use them on myself.
I am going to order the Ravintsara Oil. I didn’t realize it was better than the ravensara. Thanks again for your help!

Read more: http://naturesgiftaromatherapy.blogspot.com/2009/08/health-care-provider-seeking-swine-flu.html#ixzz0StBdiALA

______________________________________

I think it’s so important to take good care of our own health and be responsible for our own well-being. By taking these simple steps, it could save your life!

What do you do to prevent sickness and promote your own well-being?


Possibly related posts: (automatically generated)

Filed under: Uncategorized | Tagged: alternative therapies, anti-viral essential oils, aromatherapy, aromatherapy tips, cinnamon, essential oils, eucalyptus, flu prevention, glossary, H1N1 virus, how to, information on natural ingredients, lavender, mind/body/spirit, natural, natural ingredients, organic, ravensara, ravintsara, swine flu, therapeutic grade, thyme

______________________________________

I think it’s so important to take good care of our own health and be responsible for our own well-being.

What do you do to prevent sickness and promote your own well-being?

Have you tried using essential oils or making any of your own hand sanitizers? or diffuser blends?

read my ehow article

How to make a non-drying anti-bacterial hand sanitizer

http://www.ehow.com/how_4772522_make-essential-oils-aloe-gel.html

Information on Ingredients for Natural Products

I’ve compiled a list of the top five resources for consumers who are looking to find out what exactly is in those products you’re using and what to look for when purchasing ‘natural’ products.

See more at http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/1577913/information_on_ingredients_for_natural.html

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: