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Posts tagged ‘essential oil profiles’

Grapefruit Essential Oil Facts and Uses – always a favorite!

I love that grapefruit is wonderful for mind, body and spirit…

Grapefruit essential oil is one of my faves, and for good reason, not only is it a sunshiny, happy scent- it is great for a multitude of purposes, from aiding in weight loss to heart and emotional problems– grapefruit is perfect for aiding in ‘letting go’ and the ‘release’ of whatever ails you.

Most citrus essential oils are cold pressed and have a fresh, sweet, and bright scent.

Some traditional uses:

  • release
  • as it is slightly euphoric; it lifts melancholy
  • relieves muscle fatigue,
  • as an astringent for oily skin,
  • refreshes and energizes the body,
  • stimulates detoxification, (also great for anti-cellulite blends!)
  • can also be used as an airborne disinfectant

Emotional profile:

  • for use with self-doubt, feelings of worthlessness,
  • aid in dealing with criticism,
  • aids in release from dependency, frustration and grief

Blends very well with:

  • tangerine
  • neroli,
  • lemon,
  • palmarosa,
  • bergamot,
  • rosemary,
  • cardamon,
  • geranium,
  • lavender
  • cypress

READ my article on Yahoo! all about grapefruit with: grapefruit facts, grapefruit recipes,  about and benefits of grapefruit essential oil, grapefruit color codes for html, grapefruit cake and frosting recipes, and much more grapefruit!

Aura Cacia describes grapefruit’s history best:

The origin of the grapefruit poses a bit of a botanical mystery. Its appearance and flavor indicate that it’s a hybrid between a large, sour citrus fruit called the shaddock (Citrus maxima) and the sweet orange (Citrus sinensis). No records of any deliberate hybridization between the two plants have been found. Grapefruits share characteristics of both fruits: in a ripe grapefruit the tart flesh of the shaddock is tempered with the juicy sweetness of the orange. Surveys of citrus populations in the Old World and Asia haven’t been able to confirm the presence of any native-growing grapefruit trees. Similar searches in the West Indies, however, have uncovered many populations of apparently naturally growing grapefruit. It’s a puzzling question whether the grapefruit was deliberately bred or emerged as a spontaneous hybrid in some old Caribbean citrus grove.

The modern American grapefruit growing industry developed in Florida in the mid-1800s. Many of the early varieties of fruit resemble their wild-growing cousins in that they’re smaller and contain many seeds. More recent hybrids are bred for appearance and size. The shelf-appeal and seedlessness of varieties developed for the fresh fruit market have been bred at the expense of flavor. Because the older varieties are often superior in taste and juiciness, they are used to make grapefruit juice. The extraction of the essential oil is a by-product of the juicing process.

The grapefruit’s essential oil glands are deeply imbedded in the flavedo, the outer peel of the fruit. The thick, spongy white layer of the peel is known as the albedo. The albedo will absorb and decrease the yield of essential oil if the two layers aren’t carefully separated before extraction. This separation is done by machines that roll and scrape the flavedo away from the fruit before it goes on to be juiced. The abraded flavedo forms a wet, pulpy mass that’s put in a centrifuge, where the oil is separated from the solids. The solids can then be pressed for additional oil. The extracted oil is filtered and bottled.

Using this method of extraction, a ton of fresh fruit will produce 1.5 pounds of essential oil. A much more substantial yield of 25 pounds of essential oil could be obtained if the peels were chopped and steam distilled, but steam distillation destroys the delicate, sweet-smelling constituents of the fresh peel. The quality of this oil would be unsuitable, especially for aromatherapy purposes.

Aura Cacia: https://www.auracacia.com/auracacia/aclearn/eo_grapefruit.html

Capillary Gas Chromatography and Carbon-13 NMR Spectroscopy

.38% alpha-Pinene .42% Sabinene .02% beta-Pinene 1.37% Myrcene .02% para-Cymene 83.40% Limonene .01% gamma-Terpinene .62% Octanal .07% Nonanal .40% Decanal .02% Dodecanal .04% alpha-Terpineol .09% Citronellal .04% Neral .06% Geranial .06% Carvone .24% beta-Caryophyllene .10% Nootkatone .01% (Z)-3-Hexenol .09% 1-Octanol .01% (E)-2-Hexenal .01% Ethyl butyrate.01% Valencene

Some Places Where You Can Buy Grapefruit Essential Oil

whether you like white grapefruit, pink grapefruit, from overseas, or right here in Florida, you can find grapefruit essential oil quite easily.

 The Glory of Grapefruit essential oil, and grapefruit recipes,

Yahoo Contributor Content closed, full article below:
There’s nothing like the divine scent or taste of the tangy sweetness of a juicy grapefruit. Grapefruit essential oil is one of my faves, and for good reason–not only is it a sunshiny, happy scent, it is great for a multitude of purposes; from aiding in weight loss, to heart and emotional problems. Grapefruit is perfect for aiding in ‘letting go’ and the ‘release’ of whatever ails you.

Of the many claims that have been made concerning grapefruit, some mention that grapefruit can affect everything from aiding weight loss- boosting immunity and lifting spirits–to fighting cancer and even heart issues. Just be aware that Harvard online said that grapefruit can interact with many medications; (see this table which lists some of the most important along with related drugs that are less likely to be influenced).

Though they may vary in color, they don’t much stray too far in their properties:

  • Ruby Red Grapefruit- deep red, deepest fruity aroma,
  • White Grapefruit – yellow in color and crisp citrus aroma,
  • Rose Grapefruit – pink/orange color and both crisp and fruity.

Grapefruit also happens to be one of my f avorite essential oil scents of the citrus oils . Not that I don’t adore the many other citrus scents like; tangerine, lemon, orange, yuzu, mandarin, kumquat, key lime…I could go on all day. I just love all citrus, and grapefruit is so bright/snappy/happy– I couldn’t imagine life without it.
About grapefruit essential oil- Aura Cacia:

The extraction of the essential oil is a by-product of the juicing process.

The grapefruit’s essential oil glands are deeply imbedded in the flavedo, the outer peel of the fruit. The thick, spongy white layer of the peel is known as the albedo. The albedo will absorb and decrease the yield of essential oil if the two layers aren’t carefully separated before extraction. This separation is done by machines that roll and scrape the flavedo away from the fruit before it goes on to be juiced. The abraded flavedo forms a wet, pulpy mass that’s put in a centrifuge, where the oil is separated from the solids. The solids can then be pressed for additional oil. The extracted oil is filtered and bottled.

Using this method of extraction, a ton of fresh fruit will produce 1.5 pounds of essential oil. A much more substantial yield of 25 pounds of essential oil could be obtained if the peels were chopped and steam distilled, but steam distillation destroys the delicate, sweet-smelling constituents of the fresh peel. The quality of this oil would be unsuitable, especially for aromatherapy purposes.

Travel with smiles:

Grapefruit essential oil is the perfect pick-me-up, especially when blended with tangerine, and is an instant mood enhancer. This could reduce accidents, and even help with road rage. Try a blend of 5 drops grapefruit essential oil, and 5 drops of tangerine essential oil in a car diffuser or 20 drops each (grapefruit and tangerine essential oil) in a 4 oz spray bottle , then fill with purified or distilled water, shake and spray….sunshine smiles in a bottle.

Speaking of sunshine smiles, what else makes you smile? Did you say cupcakes? I hadn’t had a cupcake in forever, and I’m sure that it probably would have been better to just eat the grapefruit , but I couldn’t help myself, so grapefruit cupcakes it had to be.

Of course I had to tweak the recipes, I can never just make anything exactly as written. LOL. So I decided to combine three different recipes into one: Orange Chiffon Cake, Golden Cupcakes, and then threw in a little of the Golden Layer Cake recipe, and topped it off with buttercream frosting – and of course added grapefruit juice and zest. Oh yeah. Cupcakes with a twang.

Grapefruit Cupcakes with Buttercream Grapefruit Frosting

CAKE INGREDIENTS:

10 TBL (1 stick + 1/4 stick) unsalted butter softened
2 cups (about 9 oz) cake or all purpose flour
1 cup sugar
1/3 cup brown sugar (most recipes called for only white sugar, but I had to sub. a little brown sugar!)
4 eggs
1 TBL grated grapefruit zest
1 cup sour cream
3 TBL grapefruit juice (fresh squeezed)
1/4 tsp. salt
1 1/2 tsp. baking soda

Set oven to 350 degrees. Put muffin/cupcake papers to fill two cupcake/muffin tins. Cream butter, 3 – 4 min. Gradually add sugars, and cream together until light. Beat in eggs one at a time, add zest, juice, sour cream. Sift together salt, soda and flour, and stir into batter until smooth. Use an ice-cream scoop to place batter into papers. Bake for 20 min. Cool. Then frost with buttercream grapefruit frosting.

Buttercream Grapefruit Frosting
1 stick unsalted butter (8 TBL) softened
4 cups confectioners’ sugar
1 tsp. vanilla extract
2-3 TBL. fresh squeezed grapefruit juice
1 TBL grapefruit zest
Cream butter, add remainder of ingredients and beat well. Adjust with confectioners’ sugar if too thin, or more grapefruit juice if it’s too thick. Frost cupcakes after cooling.

Want to know how to make Candied Grapefruit Peel: for the top? Click here. .

Enjoy!

MORE GRAPEFRUIT!

And in case you’re looking for grapefruit color palette html codes try here, or here.

Or if you’d like to paint your room grapefruit try one of these Sherwin Williams colors.

Had enough of grapefruit yet? If not…see my blog post here.
See resources for more information on the glory of grapefruit.
RESOURCES & More Reading:

Harvard.edu/grapefruit and medications

my blog post about grapefruit; https://yellowstaressentials.wordpress.com/2011/10/20/grapefruit-essential-oil/

Aura Cacia

Grapefruit search on Yahoo Voices

Grapefruit Benefits

Grapefruit Essential Oil ~ Aura Cacia

Grapefruit Essential Oil Facts & Uses

Search for grapefruit on YellowstarEssentials WordPress blog

Grapefruit color codes for html

Candied Grapefruit peel recipe (and triple grapefruit cupcake recipe with pics)



Coriander Essential Oil; Happiness in a bottle

Coriander happens to be one of my very favorite essential oils, especially when blended with sweet orange. The floral-sweet-green-lively scent puts a smile on my face every time I open the bottle. I use it in almost every blend I make (if possible…some blends it doesn’t suit).

If you think you don’t like coriander essential oil, try sniffing a whiff of its lovely aroma and tell me you didn’t smile 🙂

Read on for more info about this awesome essential oil!

Coriander Essential Oil

Botanical Name: Coriandrum sativum

Plant Part: Seeds

Extraction Method: Steam Distilled

Origin: India

Description: This annual or biennial plant is a native of Morocco and grows to about 1 meter (3 feet) in height. It has sparse, fine, feathery leaves and pinkish/white flowers. The brownish, globose seeds have a disagreeable smell until they ripen, when they take on their spicy aroma. The bright green delicate leaves, umbels of lace-like white flowers are followed by a mass of green (turning brown) round seeds. These seeds are hard and egg-shaped, borne in pairs, which do not separate. The Oleoresin has a strong aroma of coriander.

Color: Colorless to pale yellow clear liquid.

Common Uses: The therapeutic properties of Coriander Essential Oil include being analgesic, aphrodisiac, antispasmodic, carminative, depurative, deodorant, digestive, carminative, fungicidal, revitalizing, stimulant and stomachic. Coriander Oil can be useful to refresh and awake the mind. It can be used for mental fatigue, migraine pain, tension and nervous weakness. This oil’s warming effect is also helpful for alleviating pain such as rheumatism, arthritis and muscle spasms. There are some indications that it can also be useful in combating colds and flu.

Consistency: Thin

Note: Medium

Strength of Aroma: Medium

Blends well with: Coriander Essential Oil blends particularly well with Bergamot, Cinnamon Bark , Ginger, Grapefruit, Lemon, Neroli and Orange.

Aromatic Scent: Coriander Oil has a sweet, spicy, slightly fruity, herbaceous warm smell. It has been claimed by some aromatherapists that the aroma improves if allowed to age.

History: The Egyptians used Coriander seeds as an aphrodisiac. The Romans and Greeks used the seeds to flavor their wines and in India the seeds are used in their cooking. Coriander seeds were even found in the tomb of Tutankhamun. The Carmelite order in France used Coriander seeds to flavor their 17th century eau de toilette and it is still used in Chartreuse and Benedictine liqueurs.

Cautions: Avoid use during pregnancy.

Coriander, the herb of happiness

When I open the bottle a sharp, astringent scent punches out and fills the room. “This isn’t coriander!” I think. The aha moment comes when I realize it may be cilantro – the other part of the plant. I enjoy using coriander seed essential oil in perfumes and have had a couple of bottles of the essential oil that aged nicely to develop a lovely, sweet woody scent reminiscent of rosewood, thanks to the linalool that is present, up to 70% of the essential oil. Smaller percentages of components like thujene, pinene, terpinene and limonene contribute a sharp, herbal and lemony smell and add character as the oil ages. I can smell these in my new coriander supply currently aging on my shelf. Unripe seeds have a higher percentage of aldehydes including trans-2-decenal and decanal that likely add a sharp smell and are responsible for the fresh taste of the leaf, cilantro. The aldehyde C-11 or undecanal is also present in the leaves and is used in perfumes to provide a clean smell. The seeds when immature may smell strongly and be unpleasant but as they age the smell becomes citrusy, woody, spicy and complex. The taste also mellows in older seeds.

Coriander may be one of the oldest flavorings in the world, both seed and leaf. Ancient Egyptians used to bruise the seeds and mix it into their bread. The greens are one of the bitter herbs mentioned in the Bible to be used for Passover. Coriander has been used by the Chinese as a love potion and more recently finds a place in many of the world’s cuisines and all parts are used including the root. Many know the leaves as cilantro and enjoy the spicy citrus taste this herb adds to a variety of foods. Some people, however, detect an unpleasant soapy odor and strongly dislike the herb. Julia Child has been reported to say that she would pluck out any cilantro in her food and throw it on the floor. Distaste for cilantro may be genetic or it may be learned or a combination of both. Like many herbs and spices, coriander is known to be an antioxidant and anti-bacterial and may assist digestion. It is in the carrot/parsley family.

I like how I can get spice and wood from this lovely oil and how it tames cinnamon, if only a little bit. It also provides lift in heavy floral perfumes and is often found paired with rose or jasmine. Coriander was used in Carmelite water by fourteenth century nuns and in Eau de Carmes cologne – a Paris favorite for many years. With a little bit of rose geranium or palmarosa it may be used as a substitute for endangered rosewood in some blends.-from; http://bellyflowers.blogspot.com/2011/03/coriander-herb-of-happiness.html

Rose Geranium Essential Oil

Rose Geranium

Pelargonium roseum is not only beautiful, but happens to be one of the most useful, and wonderful essential oils we have. As you’ll soon see, it’s uses are many and it’s beauty is more than skin deep.

Rose Geranium, or Geranium Rose-

AuraCacia has this to say about Geranium essential oil:

Pelargonium graveolens, the rose-scented geranium, belongs to the same plant genus as the popular red-flowered window box geranium. Geraniums are native to arid areas of South Africa’s Cape Province. The plant is highly drought resistant, thanks to its semi-succulent, water-conserving stems and leaves.

The essential oil in rose geranium leaves has constituents — geraniol, linalol and citronellol — that are also present in rose oil. It’s not surprising that the aroma of geranium’s fragrance resembles that of rose with a musty, minty-green undertone.

Geranium oil has been described as a natural perfume complete unto itself. It’s often used to scent soaps and detergents because, unlike many other essential oils, rose geranium’s aroma profile is not readily affected by the alkaline nature of soap products.

Rose geranium varies much across strains and distillations, in part because the plant is greatly influenced by the climate and soil in which it grows. Geranium oil can range from very sweet and rosy to musty, minty and green. One type of geranium oil, known as Bourbon, has established itself as a premium perfume oil. Bourbon geranium is cultivated and distilled exclusively on the island of Reunion in the Indian ocean. The environment of Reunion has produced a strain of geranium with a very rich, rosy aroma. Perfumers prefer to work with Bourbon oil because it blends well with a wide array of very different oils including clove, sandalwood and lavender.

The main geranium oil-producing regions of the world are found on the African continent, Russia, China and Reunion. Russian and Chinese oils tend to have a greener, fresh-rosy aroma while Egyptian and Reunion oils tend to be heavier and darker.

Geranium oil is distilled from the above-ground parts of the plant. Most of the essential oil glands are found in its leaves. After cutting, the plants are partially dried to increase the yield of oil. That way there’s less water to be vaporized and extracted from the plant material during the distillation.

Popular during the Victorian era, rose geranium was often kept potted in parlors were a fresh sprig was always available to revive the senses. The fresh leaves were also offered in finger bowls at formal dining tables.

Today, geranium is an indispensable aromatherapy oil. It’s one of the best skincare oils, offering relief from congested, oily and dry skin. On an emotional level, geranium promotes stability and balance.

Aromatherapy Uses: Lifts the spirits, boosts immune system and heals a variety of skin conditions such as eczema, burns, wounds, bruises and others. Great hormonal balancer for women. analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antidepressant, antihemorrhagic, cicatrizant, diuretic, lymphotonic, antimicrobial, antipruritic, antispasmodic , antiviral, astringent, tonic & stimulant, pancreatic stimulant, deodorant, hepato-stimulant, phlebotonic

Skin: acne,burns, bruises, broken capillaries, balances oil glabnd secretion, congested and mature skin, healing especially after facial plastic surgery, eczema, cellulite, mosquito repellent

Respiratory: asthma, sore throat, tonsillitis, clears mucus Muscular/skeletal: osteo- arthritis, rheumatism

Digestive: jaundice, gastritis, colitis, cleans digestive system of mucus, liver tonic

Cardiovascular/Lymphatic: aids poor circulation, stimulates lymphatic system, hemorrhoids, phlebitis

Immune: immune stimulant Endocrine: adrenal, cortical, glandular problems

Genito-Urinary/ Reproductive: eases PMS, menopause, kidney tonic-diuretic

Nervous/ Brain/ Mind: nervous stress, neuro-balancing, neuralgia, quells anxiety, uplifting antidepressant

Rose Geranium

Emotional/Energetic: Taps into the power of the heart, increasing imagination, intuition and sensory world. Increases the capacity for intimate communication, allowing one to receive and to give and express.

Rose geranium’s strong middle note blends well with basil, bergamot, cedar, citronella, clary sage, fennel,  jasmine, juniper, lavender, lemon, lemongrass, neroli, nutmeg, and rosemary. Also Blends very well with: Eucalyptus, lavender, clary sage, rose, lime, orange, frankincense, grapefruit, ylang ylang

RECIPE for

Sunshine Smiles Aromatherapy Recipe

Ingredients

  • 10 drops Bergamot essential oil
  • 10 drops Grapefruit essential oil
  • 15 drops Sweet Orange essential oil
  • 5 drops Rose Geranium essential oil
  • 3 drops Ylang ylang extra essential oil
  • 3 drops Spruce essential oil (or sandalwood for more calming)
  • 4fl oz (125ml) carrier oil of your choice, such as jojoba, grapeseed oil, fractionated coconut oil, hazelnut oil, or any you like.

Directions;

Combine all the ingredients in a dark glass or PET plastic bottle. Store it in a cool, dark place (not your bathroom – it’s too warm and humid.)
To use your aromatherapy bath oil, pour about a tablespoon into the bath after you’ve finished running the water.
Handy Hint: This aromatherapy bath oil is excellent for acne. To boost its acne-fighting powers, use grapeseed oil as the carrier oil (it’s astringent – helps tighten pores and reduce oil production.)

SCIENTIFIC INFO:

Botanical name: Pelargonium Odorantissimum / Graveolens
Botanical family: Geraniaceae

Note: Middle

Part of plant used: Stems and leaves

Origin: Algeria, Reunion, Madagascar and Guinea

Description: Sweet and heavy, similar to Rose

History: The Ancients regarded Geranium as an exceptional vulnerary with the power to mend fractures and eliminate cancers.

Properties and Indications:

  • Antiseptic
  • Astringent – contracts capillaries
  • Stimulates the nervous system
  • Excellent for the skin – eczema and psoriasis
  • Anticoagulant – for circulation
  • Haemostatic – prevents hemorrhage
  • Gentle detoxification
  • Hemorrhoids
  • Varicose veins
  • Harmonizing and re-balancing
  • Regulates and stimulates the adrenal cortex which in turn balances the body

Personality

  • Ambivalent- refreshing and a tonic but also has calming qualities

Safety Data: Non-toxic, non-irritant and non-sensitizing

SOURCES: Sheppard-Hanger Sylla, THE AROMATHERAPY PRACTITIONER REFERENCE MANUAL, Tampa, 1998 Mojay, Gabriel, Aromatherapy for Healing the Spirit, London, 1996 Battaglia, Salvatore, The Complete Guide to Aromatherapy, Brisbane, 1997

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