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Posts tagged ‘Angel’

Vibrational Healing: Revealing the Essence of Nature through Aromatherapy and Essential Oils Book Share

While creating some synergies for a client today, I came across this book and felt such joy emanating from it’s pages I had to share it…

Vibrational Healing: Revealing the Essence of Nature through Aromatherapy and Essential Oils

Here’s a couple reviews-

Everyone searches to magically transform their lives… takes you from the mundane confusion… and shows you the way to yourself. — Shelley Winn Damon, National Federation of Spiritual Healers, Austin, Texas

I was amazed. I have witnessed exciting results,both with myself and clients,when combining Deborah’s techniques. — Linda Olger, Registered Nurse, Massage Therapist, Atlanta, Georgia

Description

In a therapeutic blend bringing together Chinese Medicine, reflexology, and cranial sacral therapy, massage therapist Deborah Eidosn shows how essential oils and Bach Flower Remedies can be used to identify and free up emotional blockages which may be causing you problems.Eidson explains that all chakras have a location associated with organs, as well as a sound, color, and element. Giving a good massage can involve stimulating meridians and meridian points, finding the location of blocked energy, and then working with oils to affect change.

Vibrational Healing: Revealing the Essence of Nature through Aromatherapy and Essential Oils

 

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Using Essential Oils for Balancing Chakras; 5th Chakra or the Throat Chakra

If you missed part one, see it here; Essential Oils and Chakras Part One; Introduction to Using Essential Oils for Balancing the Chakras and Part Two; Using Essential Oils for Balancing Chakras; The Root Chakra ,and Part Three; The Sacral Chakra. , and Part Four; The Solar Plexus Chakra , and Part Five; The Heart Chakra .

The Fifth Chakra (Vishudha) or Throat Chakra;
The fifth chakra is also known as the throat chakra or in Sanskrit- Vishudha (which means ‘pure’) and relates to communication and divine will, creativity, self-expression and the search for truth. It is where we speak our truths and take responsibility for our words.
The corresponding body parts associated with the throat chakra are the throat and neck, esophagus, mouth, teeth, upper lungs and respiratory system, ears, thyroid and parathyroid glands. The throat chakra also corresponds with the element of ether.
The corresponding colors associated with the throat chakra are blue, and sky blue. Blue symbolizes inspiration, devotion, infinity and religious goals, and the color blue also produces a calm and peaceful feeling.
The throat chakra enables us to communicate our thoughts and feelings, and is directly connected to the ability to express inner creativity. Both our teaching and learning are affected by the balance of the throat chakra. A strong throat chakra encourages leadership, the spirit of truth and listening to one’s intuition.

Read the rest of my article at Associated Content/Yahoo here

Top 10 Songs About Angels on my Angels & Aromatherapy Blog

Check out the top 10 angel songs…are your favorites included?

Top 10 Songs About Angels – Here are the top 10 songs about angels in the pop/rock/alternative genres … http://ow.ly/1aIcHZ

To see the Top 50 Songs about angels see my hubpage about it here

Using Essential Oils for Balancing Chakras; The Root Chakra

This article is about understanding the sacral chakra, essential oils, gemstones, crystals, flower essences, sounds and notes used to help balance the sacral chakra, angelic aid in balancing the sacral chakra, as well as which essential oils to use, and how to use them.

If you missed part one, see it here; Essential Oils and Chakras Part One; Introduction to Using Essential Oils for Balancing the Chakras , it will help you understand the basis of this series of articles on balancing the chakras with essential oils.

To read the entire article, please visit the associated content/yahoo article by clicking this link.

Also see;

Essential Oil Recipe Blends & Dilutions for Energy Work; Clearing & Balancing the Chakras

Hello world!

Yellowstar*Essentials; Aromatherapy for Mind, Body, Spirit & Home

Yellowstar*Essentials; Aromatherapy for Mind, Body, Spirit & Home

Welcome to my new WordPress.com blog. This blog will mostly deal with the art of Aromatherapy and my business: Yellowstar*Essentials; Custom Aromatherapy for Mind, Body, Spirit & Home. This blog will also deal with other Alternative Healing Therapies and living naturally with tips, recipes and other useful  information on such. I’ve created this site for everyone interested in learning more about alternative therapies for improving all aspects of their lives. Enjoy!

Feel free to ask any questions, add comments, suggestions, or any feedback, it’s all  much appreciated. I’d love to know what you think!

Making Sense of SCENT

Making sense of SCENT

IN THE UNITED STATES, where using scents to heal has moved into the mainstream, the term ­aromatherapy is broadly applied. Scented candles with names such as “Meditation” and “Sensuality” can be found at the checkout stand of the local market, along with spray bottles of scents designed to set a mood with the pump of an atomizer. The aromatherapy category has also come to include bath salts, shampoos, lotions, potpourris, and much more. The multitude of products is nothing new, though; historically, essential oils have been used in a variety of forms, depending on the culture and new discoveries about aromatherapy.

While a large selection is nice, it may be confusing when you’re just beginning to use aromatherapy. To help you be a wise consumer, we offer a little basic background.

The discovery

Aromatherapy is a relatively new term, although the practice of using scents to heal is centuries old and crosses many cultural lines. Ancient Egyptians used scents (incense burners have been found in ancient tombs), as did the early Chinese, who employed scents in civil and religious ceremonies. During times of plague, Europeans carried pomanders made of oranges and cloves to mask odors and fend off diseases.

It wasn’t until the twentieth century, however, that the term aromatherapy actually came about. It refers to a specific form of holistic healing that involves carefully ­inhaling or applying herbal essential oils, which are volatile, aromatic plant compounds. René Gatefossé, a French chemist working in the lab of his family’s perfume business during the 1930s, is credited with coining the term. Gatefossé began researching the healing properties of herbal essential oils when he saw his own hand—burned accidentally while working—heal quickly and without scarring after he plunged it into a bowl of diluted lavender oil. In 1937, he published Aromathérapie detailing his research. During World War II, another Frenchman, Jean Valnet, a medical doctor, used essential oils to treat wounded soldiers, and an Austrian biochemist, Marguerite Maury, introduced the use of essential oils with massage techniques.

Today in France, more than 1,500 doctors have been trained in aromatherapy and prescribe essential oils routinely; in England, aromatherapy is used in hospitals to help patients relax and sleep after surgery.
Aromatherapy as profession

The aim of trained aromatherapists is to work with the body to promote health, not to provide a “silver bullet” cure. Generally speaking, an aromatherapist assesses both symptoms and an individual’s lifestyle—his or her diet, stresses, personal goals, and fears. From there, the aromatherapist determines which oil or blend of oils is appropriate.

Massage forms the major part of the treatment, and some aromatherapists consider the use of essential oils in therapeutic massage as the oils’ most effective purpose. Aromatherapists choose from among more than 400 essential oils as they work and, when preparing a massage oil, blend essential oils with a carrier oil (see the glossary,). As they massage, the oil penetrates the body.

In the United States, no licensing agency for aromatherapists exists, nor does a national standard for certification. If you are seeking an aromatherapist, remember that many holistic health-care practitioners, including herbalists and naturopaths, use essential oils as part of their practice, so they may be able to direct you to an aromatherapist in your area. . Some aromatherapy schools have created their own certification standards, including required coursework and certified hours of practice.

Other applications

“Clinical aromatherapy” refers to the use of essential oils to heal specific conditions. The technique is used by many health-care practitioners, including herbalists and naturopaths. Although not yet wholeheartedly embraced by Western medicine, clinical aromatherapy is based on scientific evidence that, in turn, is grounded in basic anatomy.

When we breathe, odors—volatile molecules that float through the air—fill the nostrils and travel up two narrow chambers to the olfactory epithelium, a receiver that extends from the outside directly into the brain. Odor molecules bind to receptors there, and neurons send messages to the brain’s olfactory bulbs, where other neurons reduce the complexities of odors. Mitral neurons send messages to the limbic system, the source of emotion and memory. Scientists say that some smells cause the limbic system to activate the hypothalamus and pituitary gland to stimulate hormone production; these glands control sex, appetite, and other body functions. Although much research remains to be done to determine the effects of specific essential oils on both mind and body, strong evidence exists to show that they do

Another way of using scent is what some call “environmental aromatherapy.” It refers to diffusing essential oils into the air to enhance living space. The aim of this practice isn’t to mask foul smells but to cleanse the air. Diffusers are usually made of ceramic or glass, with a small container for water that is heated by a candle or electricity. Drops of essential oil are added to the water (the number of drops of essential oil is determined by the size of the room and the intensity of fragrance desired); heat releases volatile essential oil molecules into the atmosphere. Burning incense is a centuries-old method of diffusing essential oils into the air, as is the burning of scented candles.
The pros and cons of doing it yourself

Aromatherapy can be practiced alone if you’re seeking relaxation or gentle invigoration. Diffusing scent into the air, adding herbal oils to your bath, or rubbing a few drops of diluted essential oil into your feet or hands are simple ways to do it yourself. And if you want to learn more, many books and other resources can provide you with good information on how to begin Because essential oils can be toxic if not used properly, consult the “Usage Warnings and Cautions” from my website.

However, for more serious health conditions, consult a trained professional. Asthma, for example, should never be self-treated, and people undergoing chemo­therapy or treatment for serious illnesses such as AIDS shouldn’t try to heal symptoms associated with these conditions without a health-care provider’s guidance. Pregnant women should be especially cautious when trying to decide which essential oils they can use safely, and parents should always consult a health-care provider when considering using essential oils on children.

Scent sense

The best chance for a happy experience with aromatherapy is to choose good-quality products. With the increasing number of products out there, this may sound easier said than done. But a few simple rules of thumb should help.

Keep in mind that not all scents are natural essential oils. Some are synthesized in the laboratory. If an oil is labeled “fragrance,” it’s probably synthetic. A good essential oil will come from a named botanical species and, when appropriate, a named carrier oil. Its aroma will be vigorous and lively, rather than simply strong. Occasionally, essential oils are “extended” by adding alcohol or cheaper vegetable oils, rather than a preferred carrier oil such as jojoba or almond oil or similar. Look for both the botanical name and the carrier oil on the ingredients list of the essential oil bottle or accompanying information. Some essential oils, pure or already blended in carrier oil, come in tiny vials; these products should have ingredient information readily available in the packaging, with a clear description of how the product has been prepared and/or instructions on how to use it and whether you need to dilute the oil with a carrier oil.

Many commercial brands will also include instructions for use. One sampler of six essential oils in small vials, for example, includes specific instructions for using each, such as adding a couple of drops to bathwater or mixing them with an ounce of carrier oil.

Remember that essential oils come from plants, so the aroma of the best oils will vary from year to year because of changes in climate, rainfall, and soil conditions—all of which affect the herb from which the essential oil comes.

Store your oils in their bottles, preferably dark ones, in a cool, dry place. Be sure to keep your essential oils separate from medicines and from solutions that might be affected by the oils’ aromas. Keep caps tightly sealed to avoid evaporation.

It’s important that serious conditions be treated by a qualified health-care practitioner. Essential oils are most commonly used in preparations to relieve aches and pains, encourage relaxation, ease stress, and care for hair and skin. Some, such as the antifungal tea tree oil, can be used to fight minor injuries or irritations; others, such as essential oil of eucalyptus, can be added to a steam to help clear a stuffy head.

Finally, take the sniff test. If you’re a healthy individual who doesn’t have a history of sensitivity but wonder whether a particular essential oil is right for you, put a small drop of the oil onto a cotton ball and sniff to make sure that you find the scent appealing. Don’t inhale right from the bottle—essential oils possess strong aromas and can cause a reaction when sniffed in this way.

GLOSSARY

Carrier oils: As a general rule, herbal essential oils shouldn’t be applied to the skin directly because they are highly concentrated and can sting or otherwise irritate. Instead, essential oils are blended with “carrier oils” to dilute them. The best carrier oils are virgin cold-pressed oils such as almond, walnut, wheatgerm, apricot kernel, and hazelnut. Castor and jojoba oils are also acceptable carrier oils. Essential oils are volatile, so they evaporate quickly when exposed to air but are soluble in carrier oils.

Diffusers:Often made of ceramic or glass, diffusers are used to disperse essential oils into the air. They hold a small container for water, which is heated by a candle or electricity. Drops of essential oil are added to the water; the number of drops of essential oil is determined by the size of the room and the intensity of fragrance desired. Heat releases the volatile essential oil molecules into the atmosphere.

Essential oils: Highly fragrant, concentrated, and potent substances that come from plants and can be irritating to the skin if undiluted. The term can be traced to sixteenth-century alchemists searching for “quintessence,” or the secret of life. Until the early part of the twentieth century, many medicines and personal products such as soaps were made with essential oils.

Perfume: From the Latin per fumare, meaning “through smoke.” Oriental cultures found religious and spiritual connotations in the aromatic smoke of burning herbs; Native Americans burn aromatic herbs to create smoke for their healing ceremonies. Today’s perfumes are largely syntheti

To learn more

BOOKS, ARTICLES, AND OTHER RESOURCES

Gibbons, Boyd. “The Intimate Sense of Smell.” National Geographic 1986, 170(3):324–361.

Green, Mindy. Natural Perfumes: Simple, Sensual, Personal Aromatherapy Recipes. Loveland, Colorado: Interweave Press: In press; due in June 1999.

Kusmerik, Jan, ed. Aromatherapy for the Family: An Introductory Guide to the Use of Holistic Aromatherapy for Harmony and Well-being. London: ­Wigmore, 1997.

Obuchowski, Christa. “Aromatherapy.” In The Whole Mind: The Definitive Guide to Complementary Treatments for Mind, Mood, and Emotion, edited by Lynette Bassman. Novato, California: New World Library, 1998.

Rose, Jeanne, and Susan Earle, eds. The World of Aromatherapy. Berkeley, California: Frog, Ltd., 1996.

The Aromatic Thymes, a quarterly publication. Subscription information: (847) 304-0975.

Tisserand, Robert, and Tony Balacs. Essential Oil Safety. New York: Churchill Livingstone, 1995.

If you’re interested in real essential oils and products made with them, try
Yellowstar*Essentials

Holistic Nutrition; Sources of Vitamins, Minerals & Trace Minerals

Here’s a great list of Holistic Herbal Sources for Natural Nutrition

Herb Sources of Vitamins, Minerals and Trace Minerals
Many herbs are excellent for getting the vitamins and minerals our bodies need
because the body usually digests them easier through plants, much easier
than from fish or animal sources.

Listed below are some herb sources of vitamins, minerals and trace minerals.

VITAMINS
Vitamin A: Alfalfa, Cayenne, Eyebright, Lambs Quarter, Paprika, Red Clover, Violet, Yellow Dock
Vitamin B: Alfalfa, Dulse, Fenugreek, Kelp, Licorice, Saffron
Vitamin C: Bee Pollen, Chickweed, Echinecea, Garlic, Golden Seal, Juniper BerrY, Paprika, Peppermint, Rosehips, Sorrel, Violet, Watercress
Vitamin D: Alfalfa, Dandelion, Red Raspberry, Rosehips, Sarsaparilla, Watercress
Vitamin E: Alfalfa, Burdock, Dandelion, Dong Quai, Kelp, Scullcap, Sesame, Slippery Elm, Watercress
Vitamin G: Fo-ti-tieng
Vitamin K: Alfalfa, Gotu Kola, Shepherd’s Purse
Niacin: Alfalfa, Fenugreek, Parsley Watercress
Vitamin P: (Rutin, Bioflavenoids) Acerola, Paprika

MINERALS
Calcium: Aloe, Cayenne, Chamomile, Fennel, Marshmallow, Sage, White Oak Bark
Cobalt: Dandelion, Horsetail, Juniper Berries, Lobelia, Parsley, Red Clover, White Oak Bark
Iodine: Bladderwrack, Kelp
Iron: Burdock, Chickweed, Ginseng, Hops, Mullein, Nettles, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sarsaparilla, Scullcap, Yellow Dock
Magnesium: Alfalfa, Catnip, Ginger, Gotu Kola, Red Clover, Rosemary, Valerian, Wood Betony
Potassium: Aloe, Cayenne, Fennel, Golden Seal, Parsley, Rosehips, Slippery Elm, Valerian
Zinc: Burdock, Chamomile, Dandelion, Eyebright, Marshmallow, Sarsaparilla

TRACE MINERALS
Alfalfa, Burdock, Dandelion, Kelp, Yellow Dock, Parsley, Red Clover, Rosehips, Sage, Sarsaparilla, Valerian

Hope you find some good use for this info……..

You could prepare them in a number of ways, here’s some examples;

How Do You Prepare Herbs?

Capsule: This is the most popular way most people take their herbs. Some of the reasons: it’s easy, convenient, avoids bitter taste, saves on preparation, and provides an exact regulated dosage to the body.

Decoction: To extract the deeper essences from harder or coarser herbs such as stems, barks, and roots. The herbs are usually simmered uncovered for 10 to 20 minutes until 1/3 of the water has decreased through evaporation, usually one part plant to twenty parts water. Note: for coarser herbs such as Valerian and Burdock, these must be gently simmered in a covered pot to bring out their medicinal properties. Strain before using.

Extracts: Extracts are a highly concentrated alcohol base in liquid form derived from pure herbs. Many people use herbal extracts who are unable to swallow the usual dose. Exact dosages are recommended on individual bottles. This is one of the more convenient ways to take herbs.

Fomentation: A fomentation is an external application of herbs, generally used to treat swellings, pains, cold and flu. To prepare a fomentation, soak a towel or cloth in the desired tea, and apply the towel over the affected area as hot as can be tolerated without burning. Cover the towel with a dry flannel cloth. Repeat as needed.

Infusion: The most common way of preparing herbs. The extraction of the active properties of a substance by steeping or soaking it, usually in water. The usual amount is a teaspoon of leaves, blossoms, or flowers to a cup of boiling water. The water is poured over the herbs, then steeped for 3 to 5 minutes. Strain before using. Honey may be added to taste.

Plaster: A plaster is much like a poultice, but the herbal materials are placed between two pieces of cloth and applied to the affected area. When there is an irritant to the skin, this method will serve to prevent the herb from coming in direct contact with the skin.

Poultice: A poultice is usually used as an antiseptic and to reduce swelling by applying a warm mass of powdered herbs directly to the skin. To prepare, add enough hot water to make a thick paste, then apply directly to the skin. Cover with a hot moist towel and leave on until it cools. Repeat as often as needed.

Salve: A healing or soothing ointment. Use 3 oz. powered herb, 7 oz. cocoa butter, l oz. beeswax, (depending on consistency desired, more beeswax may be needed). Blend all three ingredients together in a covered pot on low heat for 1 to 2 hours. When it is cold, it should be firm and ready to use.

happy herbing!

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