All about aromatherapy, alternative medicine & the healing arts, beauty, & the mind-body-spirit and home. Visit us on FB: https://www.facebook.com/yellowstar.aromatherapy

Archive for the ‘ease depression’ Category

your happiness depends on it

This is the beginning of an amazing post .

Your happiness depends on it…  by Dr Andrea Dinardo

Most people fight against what brings them despair instead of openly receiving what brings them joy.

img_0720

Shift your focus. Change your life.

Consciously receive (accept) the good that already exists in your life.

Your health. Your freedom. Your Vision. Your voice.

Accepting what is does not lower the bar.

Quite the opposite.

Acceptance opens your eyes to all the favour that exists in your life. 

Your relationships. Your home. Your creativity. This moment.

And it’s that good feeling that motivates you to strive for more of what’s right for you.

Instead of fighting against what’s wrong for you.

Begin by accepting what is.

Moment by moment.

Your happiness depends on it.

img_0241

Click here to read how to… Apply this Post in Everyday Life

 

 

Thanks Andrea, you’re amazing!!

10 Things to do in 2017

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!

And blessings to you and yours. I sincerely wish you the best year of your life yet! ❤

Below is a list of the 10 things I’m going to do this year…I hope you consider them as well 🙂

The angel drawing below is one I’m currently working on. I hope to not only finish it, but also get it on canvas, and painted too! My niece said I should name it sun portal, and a  friend named him Aaron, but since he’s an angel I had to add the -iel at the end, so he’s been named Aaroniel Guardian of the Sun Portal!

😀

Ten things to do in 2017:

1. Take it a day at a time.

You don’t have to know what you’re doing the next day or even the next hour. I’ve learned that the more you think in the future, the shorter the day seems and the months fly past you and you’re left feeling discontent and unsatisfied. It’s almost like everything has been in a blur, and you find yourself saying, “the year went by so fast”, even though you haven’t accomplished much. So do everything in the moment of ‘now’, and cherish each minute like it’s the last minute you have.

2. Let it go.

You know nothing is going to change, because you can’t change people unless they truly want to and you can’t change the past either, and the sooner you realize this, you will spend more time being happy than in a constant battle with your mind and your heart. They need to rest too.

3. Take risks.

If you never take any, the moment that turned out for the worst could have turned out for the best. This works vice-versa as well, but either way, you will learn from these experiences. You won’t forget how rapidly your heart was beating in these moments and how electric you felt. It will be worth it in the end, trust me.

4. Call up that person that you didn’t spend enough time getting to know, simply because you were too distracted with somebody else or just didn’t feel like you’d become something more than acquaintances. Greet strangers and embrace the idea of diversity. Ask questions about different cultures, morals, ideas, beliefs; educate yourself as much as you can.

5. Go ahead and wear that outfit you keep telling yourself that it doesn’t look good on you.

You bought it because you liked it, yes? So, show it to the whole damn world. If you do it with a smile and confidently squared shoulders—even better. You are beautiful.

6. Instead of procrastinating and wallowing in self-pity, get up and do something.

Sitting around is not going to do much but make you feel horrible, and you’ll create scenarios that may not even exist or be as big in your head that will cause matters to become worse. You want this to be your year of explosive progress? Set goals and strive to achieve them. You want to look back at the end of the year and say, “I did good”.

7. Spend more time with your family or friends.

Build a support system so strong, that you will never feel lonely. In fact, this support system will lead you to feeling content even when you are alone, because you won’t feel the constant need to either be with someone or have somebody who loves you, because you know you’ll have people who love you and the more love you surround yourself with, the easier it becomes to love yourself too.

8. Be kind always and be angry when you need to be.

Stand up for the ideas that you believe in and don’t back down from them just because you have a different opinion. Learn to love the sound of your voice when it bounces off the walls of a classroom full of people, because your voice has the power to change a million minds. Remember, you are allowed to feel whatever it is you feel.

9. Go on more road trips or just take a few minutes to be outside by yourself.

Inhale and exhale the air around you. Watch the stars, the sunset, the sunrise, the birds flying in the sky, the cars passing by. Walk in the rain sometimes without an umbrella, instead of running. Let the sunlight soak your skin more often. God, isn’t the world itself beautiful?

10. Be faithful.

This is the year you hoped to be better. Don’t let anything stop you from achieving that, because you are limitless as long as you believe yourself to be.

– aawordthings via Tumblr
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Angel drawing below by Candice

8 Hand Signs Yoga Masters Use To Get Rid Of Migraines, Anxiety, And Depression

mudras.jpg

Many people practice yoga without knowing about Mudras.

If you’re looking for other ways to alleviate anxiety, depression and migraines…read on!

It’s time  to start using these hand gestures that stimulate different areas of your brain to promote health! Share these 8 poses with your fellow yoga lovers today.

This amazing article was written by Dr. Halland Chen, an MD who currently practices in New York at the Vein Institute and Pain Centers of America. —From The Hearty Soul

Eight Yoga Mudras for Better Health

meditation

1. Gyan Mudra – Mudra of Knowledge

 

As the name suggests, this mudra increases our knowledge and improves memory and concentration. It stimulates the pituitary and endocrine glands and also helps with insomnia.

Description: You will often see this mudra used during meditation. Touch the tip of your thumb against the tip of the index finger. The other three fingers are stretched out, but can also remain slightly bend if that feels more free for you.

Other Instructions:  You can do this mudra any time of the day, but morning might be the most beneficial. It can be practiced in standing, sitting or even lying down.

2. Vayu Mudra – Mudra of Air

This mudra releases excess air from the stomach and can be beneficial for people suffering from chronic rheumatic conditions, arthritis, gout, Parkinson’s disease, paralysis and cervical spondylitis.

Description: There are three bones in each of the fingers called the phalanges (thumb only has two). Fold your index finger and place the base of your thumb against its distal phalanx (the bone close to the tip of the finger). The thumb comes over the index finger, and you should feel slight pressure. The other three fingers remain as stretched as possible.

Other Instructions: This mudra can be practiced any time of the day, on a full or empty stomach. To relieve the pain, hold it for 45 minutes and do it regularly. Once you achieve the desired benefits, you should stop with it as prolonged use can cause an imbalance in the body.

3. Prithvi Mudra – Mudra of Earth

This mudra is particularly beneficial when you are feeling exhausted and stressed out. It improves blood circulation naturally and reduces weakness as well as helps with the digestion system.

Description: In this mudrathe tip of the ring finger and the tip of your thumb touch. Press the tips together while the other three fingers remain as extended as possible.

Other Instructions: Preferably, perform this mudra in the morning, but other times of the day work, too.

4. Agni Mudra – Mudra of Fire

Agni mudra can also be called Surya Mudra (Mudra of the Sun). It stimulates the thyroid gland and deals with digestion, weight problems, and anxiety.

Directions: Bend your ring finger and press the base of your thumb against its second phalanx. The other fingers remain stretched out.

Other Instructions: This mudra should be practiced only in the mornings, on an empty stomach and in a sitting position. You should hold it for 5 to 15 minutes, twice daily. If you are feeling very weak, avoid this posture. Also, don’t overdo it in hot weather.

5. Varun Mudra – Mudra of Water

This simple mudra helps to regulate fluids in the body and is known for its beneficial effects on the skin. It moistens the skin as well as makes you glow.

Save

A must-read about grief

I came across this article today, and I believe it is imperative  we share this with everyone we can. …

For everyone’s  emotional well being…

I am compelled to share it here, in its entirety only because so many times when I’ve shared a great read, so often it disappears and is lost.
So, I’ve posted the whole article here and hopefully won’t be lost…

Original post from here: http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/1024302

Stifled Grief: How the West Has It Wrong

 Jun 03, 2016 | Updated Jun 07, 2016

Michelle E. Steinke Founder/CEO – One Fit Widow, My 1 Fit Life, Live the Life

PESKYMONKEY VIA GETTY IMAGES

After nearly seven years of personal experience surrounding loss, I can tell who is going to read, share and comment on this article and it’s not necessarily the audience I’ve intended. Those who have walked the horrific road of loss will shake their collective heads “Yes” at many of my points below and share with pleads for the rest of the Western World to read, learn, evolve and embrace these concepts. Unfortunately, my words will fall short for my intended audience because the premise does not yet apply to their lives…yet. In time, my words will resonate with every human on the face of this earth, but until a personal journey with loss takes place, my words will be passed over in exchange for articles about gorillas and fights over public bathroom usage.

There is nothing sexy or exciting about grief.

There is nothing that grabs a reader with no personal interest to open my words and take heed to my writing.

http://m.huffpost.com/_uac/2014adpage.html

AdChoices

I’m here to say that the West has the concept of grieving all wrong.

I’d like to point out that we are a culture of emotionally stunted individuals who are scared of our mortality and have mastered the concept of stuffing our pain. Western society has created a neat little “grief box” where we place the grieving and wait for them to emerge fixed and whole again. The grief box is small and compact, and it comes full of expectations like that range from time frames to physical appearance. Everyone who has been pushed into the grief box understands it’s confining limitations, but all of our collective voices together can’t seem to change the intense indignation of a society too emotionally stifled to speak the truth. It’s become easier to hide our emotional depth than to reveal our vulnerability and risk harsh judgment. When asked if we are alright, it’s simpler to say yes and fake a smile then, to be honest, and show genuine human emotion.

Let me share below a few of the expectations and realities that surround grief for those who are open to listening. None of my concepts fit into societies grief box and despite the resounding amount of mutual support by the grieving for what I write below, many will discount my words and label us as “stuck” or “in need of good therapy.” I’m here to say those who are honest with the emotions that surround loss are the ones who are the least “stuck” and have received the best therapy around. You see, getting in touch with our true feelings, embracing the honest emotions of death only serve to expand the heart and allow us to move forward in a genuine and honest way. Death happens to us all so let’s turn the corner and embrace the truth behind life after loss.

Expectation: Grief looks a certain way in the early days. Tears, intense sadness, and hopelessness.

Reality: Grief looks different for every single person. Some people cry intensely, and some don’t cry at all. Some people break down, and others stand firm. There is no way to label what raw grief looks like as we all handle our loss in different ways due to different circumstances and various life backgrounds that shape who we are.

Expectation: The grieving need about a year to heal.

Reality: Sometimes grief does not even get started till after the first year. I’ve heard countless grieving people say year two is harder than year one. There is the shock, end of life arrangements and other business matters that often consume the first year and the grieving do not have the time actually to sit back and take the time to grieve. The reality is there is no acceptable time frame associated with grief.

Expectation: The grieving will need you most the first few weeks.

Reality: The grieving are flooded with offers of help the first few weeks. In many cases, helping the grieving six months or a year down the line can be far more helpful because everyone has returned to their lives and the grief stricken are left to figure it out alone.

Expectation: The grieving should bury the dead forever. After a year, it is uncomfortable for the grieving to speak of their lost loved one. If they continue to talk about them, they are stuck in their grief and need to “move on.”

Reality: The grieving should speak of the dead forever if that’s what they wish to do. When someone dies, that does not erase the memories you made, the love you shared and their place in your heart. It is not only okay to speak of the dead after they are gone, but it’s also a healthy and peaceful way to move forward.

Expectation: For the widowed – If you remarry you shouldn’t speak of your lost loved one otherwise you take away from your new spouse.

Reality: You never stop loving what came before, and that does not in any way lessen the love you have for what comes after. When you lose a friend – you don’t stop having friends, and you love them all uniquely. If you lose a child and have another, the next child does not replace or diminish the love you had for the first. If you lose a spouse, you are capable of loving what was and loving what is….one does not cancel out or minimize the next. Love expands the heart, and it’s okay to honor the past and embrace the future.

Expectation: Time heals all wounds.

Reality: Time softens the impact of the pain, but you are never completely healed. Rather than setting up false expectations of healing let’s talk about realistic expectations of growth and forward movement. Grief changes who you are at the deepest levels and while you may not forever be in an active mode of grief you will forever be shaped by the loss you have endured.

Expectation: If you reflect on loss beyond a year you are “stuck.”

Reality: Not a day goes by where I am not personally affected by my loss. Seeing my children play sports, looking at my son who is the carbon copy of his Dad or hearing a song on the radio or smell in the air. Loss because part of who you are and even though I don’t choose to dwell on grief it has a way of sneaking in now and again even when I’m most in love with life at the current moment. It’s not because we dwell or focus, and it’s not because we don’t make daily choices to move forward. It’s because we loved and we lost, and it touches us for the remainder of our days in the most profound ways.

Expectation: When you speak of the dead you make the griever sad, so it’s best not to bring them up.

Reality: When we talk about our lost loved one we are often happy and filled with joy. My loss was six and a half years ago and to this day, my late husband is one of my favorite people to talk and hear about. Hearing his name makes me smile and floods my mind with happy memories of a life well lived. It makes the grieving sadder when everyone around them refuses to say their name. Forgetting they existed is cruel and a perfect example of our stifled need to fix the unfixable.

Expectation: If you move forward you never loved them or conversely if you don’t move forward you never loved them.

Reality: The grieving need to do what is right for them, and nobody knows what that is except the person going through it.

Expectation: It’s time to “move on.”

Reality: There is no moving on – there is only moving forward. From the time death touches our lives we move forward, in fact, we are not given a choice but to move forward. However, we never get to a place where the words move on resonate. The words “move on” have a negative connotation to the grieving. They suggest a closure that is nonexistent and a fictitious door we pass through.

Expectation: Grief is a linear process and a series of steps to be taken. Each level is neatly defined and the order predetermined.

Reality: Grief is an ugly mess full of pitfalls, missteps, sinking, and swimming. Like a game of shoots and ladders, you never know when the board might pull you back and send you down the ladder screaming at the top of your lungs. Just when you think you’ve arrived at the finish, you draw a card that sends you back to start and just when it appears you’ve lost the game you jump ahead and come one step closer to the front of the line.

Expectation: The grieving should seek professional forms of counseling exclusively.

Reality: The grieving should seek professional forms of counseling but also the grieving should look strongly towards alternative modes of therapy like fitness, art, music, meditation, journaling and animal therapy. The grieving should take an “active” part in their grief process and understand that coping comes in many different forms for all the different people who walk this earth.

Expectation: The grieving either live in the past or the present. IT is not possible to have a multitude of emotions.

Reality: The grieving live their lives with intense moments of duality. Moments of incredible happiness mixed with feelings of deep sadness. There is a depth of emotion that forever accompany those who have lived with a loss. That duality can cause constant reflection, and a deeper appreciation of all life has to offer.

Expectation: The grieving should be able to handle business as usual within a few weeks.

Reality: The brain of a grieving person can be in a thick fog, especially for those who have experienced extreme shock, for more than a year. Expect forgetfulness, a reduced ability to handle stress and grayness to be commonplace after a loss.

I’ve just scratched the surface above on the many areas where grief is misunderstood in our society.

One hundred percent of the people who walk this earth will deal with death. Each of us will experience the passing of someone close that we love or our personal morality. It is about time we open up the discussion around death, dying and grief and stop the stigma that surrounds our common bond. Judgment, time frames, and neat little grief boxes have no place in the reality that surrounds loss. Western culture asks us to suppress our pain, stuff our emotions and restrain our cries. Social media has given many who grieve the opportunity to open up dialogue, be vulnerable on a large scale level and take the combined heat that comes with that honesty. As a whole, society does not want to hear or accept that grief stays with us in some capacity for the rest of our lives. Just like so many other aspects of our culture, we want to hear there is a quick fix, a cure-all, a pill or a healthy dose of “get over it” to be handed out discreetly and dealt with quietly.

The reality is you will grieve in some capacity for the rest of your life. Once loss touches you-you are forever changed despite what society tells you. Stop looking at the expectations of an emotionally numbed society as your threshold and measuring stick for success. Instead, turn inward and look at the vulnerable reality of a heart that knows the truth about loss. With your firsthand knowledge escape the grief box and run out screaming truth as you go. If we make enough noise maybe someday societies warped expectation will shift to align with reality.

 

Depressed? Try these natural serotonin boosters

Too many times we hear, see and experience sadness, depression, and anxiety in our society. Many suffer terribly with these maladies and I wish I could help each and everyone…even if it’s only one soul that finds a smile in nature to ease some of their sorrow.

More and more these days, plants are finding a medicinal purpose in our lives, people like natural cures rather than subjecting themselves to harsh man-made chemicals and pills.

Essential oils like Citrus oils are happy and bright. I’ve written a lot on the subject of depression, anxiety and how nature’s gifts can help with these issues. 

Be sure to read this first if you’re new to using essential oils.

I also found another great checklist of nature’s seratonin boosters.. See this one for more on the subject.   increase seratonin with these natural remedies

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

And try these essential oil blends to brighten your life:

..💖Love was created by ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILS... it’s such a joyful scent and is reminiscent of my YELLOWSTAR ESSENTIALS blend, though mine has the addition of Roman chamomile, and Tunisian neroli …wearing it or inhaling  it brings back memories of being loved, being held, and sharing loving times and feelings.  💖
It’s very calming and helps overcome depression. This blend will help you deal with stress and other nervous conditions. Use when you are treating anxiety and overwhelming negative emotions. It especially helps you forgive others.💖
It also helps you overcome grief and let go of negative experiences. When there is overwhelming grief, the adenoids and the adrenals shut down, this blend may help open these glands so you can get control of the grief instead of it controlling you.

💖Scent:  Love has a soothing, subtle scent to it, with fruity overtones and warm undertones that make you smile.

💖Ingredients: Essential oils of: Lemon, Orange, Geranium, Bergamot, Red Mandarin, Ylang Ylang Extra, and Turkish Rose, Roman Chamomile and Tunisian Neroli  in a base of Fractionated Coconut Oil.

💖Caution: This blend contains photosensitive oils (may cause dark spots on the skin if the applied area is exposed to the direct sunlight). So stay out of sunlight for 2-3 hours after application.
Contains 66% Fractionated Coconut Oil (FCO).

—————–

Just email me at yellowstar2000@yahoo.com for more info. 😊

Save

Poetry and life advice by Rumi : The Guesthouse

Good morning and  happy spring!neroliflowers

We all know spring is a time for new beginnings, sprucing up, new growth, and renewal. But, not everyone is jumping with boundless joy everyday.

Sometimes we just don’t feel we have the energy to do that.

It could be that we are depressed, or hurting inside. Maybe it’s a darkness that won’t seem to leave, or a painful memory that won’t go away.  Whatever it is that is bringing us down; we may just need a helping hand.

Sometimes we all need a bit of a boost to help get us going, or someone to tell us everything is going to be OK.

Sometimes spiritual guidance can get us through really tough times.

And sometimes we just need a really big hug.

One of the best poems I’ve ever read does just that;

Rumi embraces our souls,

gives us wings to fly,

and gives us the courage to try.

Know that you are truly loved…<3…<3…<3

The Guesthouse by Rumi

Here’s a little wisdom from the great Persian poet Rumi.

The Guesthouse

This being human is a guesthouse
Every morning a new arrival
A joy, a depression, a meanness
Some momentary awareness
Comes as an unexpected visitor

Welcome and entertain them all!
Even if they’re a crowd of sorrows
Who violently sweep your house
Empty of its furniture
Still treat each guest honorably
He may be cleaning you out
For some new delight!

The dark thought, the shame, the malice
Meet them at the door laughing
And invite them in
Be grateful for whoever comes
Because each has been sent
As a guide from the beyond

Translated by Coleman Barks

rumi

Rumi (Jalal ad-Din Muhammad Rumi) was a 13th century Persian muslim poet, jurist, and theologian. His name literally means “Majesty of Religion”. He was born in Balkh (now part of Afghanistan) and died in present-day Turkey. His works are widely read in Iran, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, and are in translation in Turkey, Azerbaijan, the U.S., and South Asia. He lived most of his life in, and produced his works under, the Seljuk Empire. Rumi’s importance is considered to transcend national and ethnic borders.

How to feel better by breathing

Happy December angels!  8dd5782846607393551a19ee09a96b8f

I can’t believe it’s that time again. I know I say it every year, but truly, time is speeding up more and more each instance I look at the calendar on December 1.

It seems to fly by faster and faster… I mean, geez, at this rate, before I’m 60 time will be going so fast I’ll probably be making Christmas cookies on Easter! lol.

At any rate, it’s likely, and most probable that we all will get a little stressed out during the holidays.

This is some of the best and most manageable advice from a trusted source, that we could all use to help with a variety of life issues, like; 

  • give us a boost of energy when needed instead of grabbing a cup of coffee,
  • or to relax when stressed or if feeling panicky and/or anxious,
  • even for digestive disorders… (uhhh…especially after Thanksgiving, and pretty much during the entire holiday season)…ummmyeah. 

And it’s all based on one of the most natural things we do all the time –mostly without even a thought about it — Breathing. womansea

Yes, it’s just breathing.  But it’s the way we do it that can have the desired effect. These breathing exercises will help a variety of issues.

And what’s better, these techniques will not only help during the holidays, but all year through.

It’s from Dr. Weil, and I, for one, trust Dr. Weil’s  advice.

Dr. Weil is a well known Harvard trained  physician, and successful author, spokesperson, and broadly described “guru” for holistic health and integrative medicine, he’s well trusted in the medical community and has some excellent advice for more natural therapies.

The following is from his website:

Three Breathing Exercises

Since breathing is something we can control and regulate, it is a useful tool for achieving a relaxed and clear state of mind. I recommend three breathing exercises to help relax and reduce stress:
The Stimulating Breath, The 4-7-8 Breathing Exercise (also called the Relaxing Breath), and Breath Counting.
Try each of these breathing techniques and see how they affect your stress and anxiety levels.
Exercise 1:

The Stimulating Breath (also called the Bellows Breath)

The Stimulating Breath is adapted from yogic breathing techniques. Its aim is to raise vital energy and increase alertness.
  • Inhale and exhale rapidly through your nose, keeping your mouth closed but relaxed. Your breaths in and out should be equal in duration, but as short as possible. This is a noisy breathing exercise.
  • Try for three in-and-out breath cycles per second. This produces a quick movement of the diaphragm, suggesting a bellows. Breathe normally after each cycle.
  • Do not do for more than 15 seconds on your first try. Each time you practice the Stimulating Breath, you can increase your time by five seconds or so, until you reach a full minute.
If done properly, you may feel invigorated, comparable to the heightened awareness you feel after a good workout. You should feel the effort at the back of the neck, the diaphragm, the chest and the abdomen. Try this diaphragmatic breathing exercise the next time you need an energy boost and feel yourself reaching for a cup of coffee.

Exercise 2:
The 4-7-8 (or Relaxing Breath) Exercise

This breathing exercise is utterly simple, takes almost no time, requires no equipment and can be done anywhere. Although you can do the exercise in any position, sit with your back straight while learning the exercise. Place the tip of your tongue against the ridge of tissue just behind your upper front teeth, and keep it there through the entire exercise. You will be exhaling through your mouth around your tongue; try pursing your lips slightly if this seems awkward.
  • Exhale completely through your mouth, making a whoosh sound.
  • Close your mouth and inhale quietly through your nose to a mental count of four.
  • Hold your breath for a count of seven.
  • Exhale completely through your mouth, making a whoosh sound to a count of eight.
  • This is one breath. Now inhale again and repeat the cycle three more times for a total of four breaths.
Note that you always inhale quietly through your nose and exhale audibly through your mouth. The tip of your tongue stays in position the whole time. Exhalation takes twice as long as inhalation. The absolute time you spend on each phase is not important; the ratio of 4:7:8 is important. If you have trouble holding your breath, speed the exercise up but keep to the ratio of 4:7:8 for the three phases. With practice you can slow it all down and get used to inhaling and exhaling more and more deeply.
This exercise is a natural tranquilizer for the nervous system. Unlike tranquilizing drugs, which are often effective when you first take them but then lose their power over time, this exercise is subtle when you first try it but gains in power with repetition and practice. Do it at least twice a day. You cannot do it too frequently. Do not do more than four breaths at one time for the first month of practice. Later, if you wish, you can extend it to eight breaths. If you feel a little lightheaded when you first breathe this way, do not be concerned; it will pass.
Once you develop this technique by practicing it every day, it will be a very useful tool that you will always have with you. Use it whenever anything upsetting happens – before you react. Use it whenever you are aware of internal tension. Use it to help you fall asleep. This exercise cannot be recommended too highly. Everyone can benefit from it.

Exercise 3:
Breath Counting

If you want to get a feel for this challenging work, try your hand at breath counting, a deceptively simple technique much used in Zen practice.
Sit in a comfortable position with the spine straight and head inclined slightly forward. Gently close your eyes and take a few deep breaths. Then let the breath come naturally without trying to influence it. Ideally it will be quiet and slow, but depth and rhythm may vary.
  • To begin the exercise, count “one” to yourself as you exhale.
  • The next time you exhale, count “two,” and so on up to “five.”
  • Then begin a new cycle, counting “one” on the next exhalation.
Never count higher than “five,” and count only when you exhale. You will know your attention has wandered when you find yourself up to “eight,” “12,” even “19.”
Try to do 10 minutes of this form of meditation.

🙂

Thanks Dr. Weil, and thank YOU, for reading. To learn more about Dr. Weil and his suggestions for better health, go to his website.

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: