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Archive for March, 2011

How to Make a Natural Travel Kit with Essential Oils

How to Make a Natural Travel Kit with Essential Oils

Plus Recipes For; Sunburn Relief Spray, Jet Lag, Migraines, Stress Headaches, Nausea, Travel Sickness, Queasiness, Fear of Flying, and Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis

Aromatherapy can be a very helpful companion when embarking upon a long journey, or even just a short trip, and may even effectively replace some other traditional medicines for those that are looking for a natural  alternative. While traveling may be a part of our work and our play, for those that suffer from travel-troubles it can be a nightmare. If you suffer from travel sickness, headaches or migraines, queasiness, fear of flying, jet lag, insect bites and sun burns, here you will find essential oil remedies to help with those maladies. I’ve also included a recipe for a massage blend to keep deep vein thrombosis at bay, as well.

Important Notes for Using Essential Oils; Dilutions and Usage of Essential Oils:
Always dilute essential oils, as they are very potent and too concentrated to use undiluted on the skin. To use essential oils in a massage, use the following dilutions:
For most people ages 12-65 add no more than 20 drops of your chosen essential oil(s) per ounce of carrier oils. For those aged 4-6 or those over age 65, do not use more than 10 drops per ounce of carrier, and those aged 1-4, no more than 5 drops per ounce of carrier. For pregnant women or babies, only minute quantities of essential oils should be used. For instance, only 1-4 drops of essential oils should be used per ounce of carrier. And remember that only Tea Tree, Lavender, Roman Chamomile 3%, Dill, and Mandarin (be careful of phototoxicity with citrus oils), as well as Eucalyptus Smithii (the mildest of all the Eucalyptus’) are safe for children and the elderly, and are the only essential oils that should be used on pregnant women, or children under 4 years old.

READ the rest of the article at; http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/7884542/how_to_make_a_natural_travel_kit_with.html?cat=5

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/7884542/how_to_make_a_natural_travel_kit_with.html?cat=5

FromNatureWithLove.com – FromNatureWithLove.com offers a large selection of 1,750+ natural ingredients used in skin care, hair care, cosmeceutical applications, massage, aromatherapy, spa products and herbal preparations. FNWL also offers a large selection of packaging supplies, bath accessories, natural body scrubs, books and equipment.

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Skin Deep Hazardous to Natural Beauty Business Owners

A few years ago, I came across a site (Skin Deep) that promoted the idea of keeping a working database for all skin, hair, cosmetics, beauty products (etc. ) ingredients and expected those companies that wanted to be “endorsed” or at least “okayed” by Skin Deep to fill out extensive pages of information about their products including each ingredient, etc. etc.

As the owner of a natural aromatherapy products company (Yellowstar Essentials) I thought it was the coolest thing in the world that someone would take the time to create a database of chemicals found in cosmetics and also thought would be wise to use their site, enter all my products (one by one, ingredient by ingredient), which took forever just to add a few products, and still, (even though I use only all natural ingredients with essential oils) my products came up either unsearchable –because of some of the ingredients…i.e. essential oils, could not be found on their site, and because of this deemed “hazardous”. This confused me. Why were specific essential oils not found by their searchable database? And some, (if they were found) are considered more hazardous then certain deadly chemicals. This really got me scratching my head. So I did some searching and found that many people thought just as I did.

Here’s a little About SKIN DEEP (from their site)–

In 2004 we launched Skin Deep, an online safety guide for cosmetics and personal care products. Our aim was to fill in where companies and the government leave off: companies are allowed to use almost any ingredient they wish, and our government doesn’t require companies to test products for safety before they’re sold. EWG’s scientists built Skin Deep to be a one-of-a-kind resource, integrating our in-house collection of personal care product ingredient listings with more than 50 toxicity and regulatory databases.

Read more:
About the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics
Quick facts on Skin Deep
Skin Deep Product and Ingredient Databases
Data sources – toxicity, regulatory, and study availability databases
Skin Deep’s Dual Rating Factors

There seems to be numerous problems plaguing the site, as well as more and more people having issues with the value of what they deem the “hazardous” materials used in most of today’s beauty products on the market.

I mean, I’m ALL FOR companies having to show every ingredient (and not just label FRAGRANCE–when they could be using harmful sysynthetic chemicals) but c’mon! If you are going to say that an ingredient is hazardous and put a number associated with that, at least be correct in your findings. Robert Tisserand wrote a post about essential oils in their database (or lack thereof) and his findings are in alignment with mine.

Needless to say, I haven’t finished adding all my products into Skin Deep’s database because of all the problems. Here’s the post by Robert Tisserand (one of my favorite aromatherapists!) from  his website: Go Robert!!!

Check this out:

From lemon to rosewood – it’s only skin deep

It’s hard to tell how many essential oils are covered in Skin Deep, the Environmental Working Group’s database, because if you put “essential oil” their search box, the results are pretty hit-and-miss. When I tried it, only 16 of the first 50 items listed were essential oils. Lemon oil, interestingly, was listed twice: CITRUS MEDICA LIMONUM (LEMON) OIL (hazard rating 0) and CITRUS MEDICA LIMONUM (LEMON) PEEL OIL (hazard rating 2). The second one is defined as: “volatile oil obtained from the fresh peel of of lemon, Citrus medica limonum.” The first one is not defined at all, but is also listed as “Lemon essential oil, Citrus limon (lemon) essential oil..” etc.

What were they thinking? Is one of these lemon leaf oil? Clearly not. Lemon flower oil? No again, and anyway it does not exist. Lemon essence oil? That’s theoretically possible, but I doubt that the authors of Skin Deep are familiar with essence oils, which are almost entirely used in food flavorings, and there’s no way that lemon essence oil is used in 618 personal care products. So, we have two different lemon fruit peel oils, from the same plant, but with different hazard ratings.

rosewoodoil2This is not an isolated example – you will also find separate pages for ANIBA ROSAEODORA (ROSEWOOD) and ANIBA ROSAEODORA (ROSEWOOD) OIL. (Note that rosewood essential oil is the only product of this tree.) But for ultimate strangeness, nothing beats: ANIBA ROSAEODORA (ROSEWOOD) FLOWER OIL. Ironically, the only concern for this item is listed as “Data Gaps”, but the real data gap is simply that rosewood flower oil does not exist! Except on the Skin Deep database, and once they have read this blog, I imagine not for much longer. Try this exercise – do a search for “rosewood flower oil” and let me know if you find any reference to such an oil.

Aniba rosaeodora is a very tall tree that grows in South American rainforest (see pic). Yes, it has flowers, but they are, tellingly, not fragrant. Distillation is typically carried out by the felling of a single tree, and the oil comes from the wood. I cannot imagine what rosewood flower oil, if it did exist (and if the flowers were fragrant) would cost. Well actually I can imagine, it would be hugely, massively expensive and again, you would not find it in too many personal care products.

The Environmental Working Group seems to know little about essential oils, and by the way they do not mention that Aniba rosaeodora is an officially threatened species. But, perhaps the word “environmental” in their title has nothing to do with sustainability. That’s not a sarcastic comment, I am genuinely wondering.

Returning to lemon oil, two pages and two hazard ratings for the same essential oil is odd. Very odd. Adding to the confusion, Skin Deep gives limonene a hazard rating of 6 (their scale is 0-10), and yet lemon oil consists of up to 76% limonene. So here’s what I’m wondering – when rating a product containing lemon oil for its hazardous-ness (the word “risk” is inappropriate here, for reasons I will discuss another day) should we go by lemon oil, or limonene? Perhaps it depends what’s on the product label. If it mentions “lemon oil” it’s a 0, if it mentions “lemon peel oil” it’s a 2, and if it mentions either one but also limonene (which has to happen for a product containing lemon oil in Europe, as you may know) then maybe it’s a 6?

The Skin Deep number game doesn’t really matter too much at this point. It’s only a website. But, if people were to start taking this seriously, we would be in a world of confusion.

Rosewood flower oil has a hazard rating of 0, which seems appropriate for a non-existent oil. It’s also listed as appearing in “0 products”. At least they got that part right.

Note to EWG – my consultancy services are available if you want help cleaning up. I’m just saying…

March 20th, 2011 | Category: Blog

7 comments to From lemon to rosewood – it’s only skin deep

Prayer; the simplest and most powerful thing we can do

With everything that is happening in the world today, many people are disheartened, frightened, or losing hope; feeling that the end of the world is upon us. Whether this is true or not, we do have much more power than we give ourselves credit for. We can change this pattern of fear and uncertainty by simply praying. No matter your faith or beliefs, prayer is the most powerful tool we have to transform our lives and the lives of others around the globe.

Read this amazing passage from a beautiful soul….

A powerful message From ARYZ–Eden Sky....

Asleep. Dreaming. Awake. Remembering to Awaken over and over and over… As we feel a fear begin to “prey” upon our heart, mind and body, let us discipline ourselves to become alert in that moment to Pray. This act of praying does not have to look like any one certain right way. To sincerely Pray is simply to be willing to receive light to descend, penetrate, and illuminate the darknesses we harbor inside. Prayer is alchemy. Prayer can only be consummated by a willing, humble heart. Prayer is a letting go our habitual contraction into the separate-egoic-self and letting go into a vaster dimension of compassion and all-embracing awareness. It is easier than it may sound. While the Source of Prayer originates from beyond our physical body, the vibration of Prayer lives within the echo and pulse of our own heart-beat.

Prayer can be formal; it can be spontaneous. We can pray ceaselessly, to keep our vibration secure in the Light and immune to the sabotaging forces seeking to prey upon our weaknesses. We can instead turn those vulnerabilities into a prayer for strength, courage, guidance, and humility to receive assistance from our own inherent, True Nature.

Prayer happens by being authentic. We can pray devoutly while washing dishes, while baking bread, while bathing, while walking, while laughing, while crying, while smiling, while singing. Prayer can be silent or loud; chanting, whispering or screaming – breathing always. Prayer can be zen or rainbow; blank or vibrant; linking the eternal and the impermanent; the absolute and the relative; heaven and earth; formless and form…Prayer brings the Mystical into the mundane.

Prayer is a communion, a celebration of revelatory remembering. Each time we remember to Pray, through our intentions, through the gestures of our body, speech, and mind – we align with the very Source of our Being, and are thus Renewed by our own wholeness.

When 2 or more beings gather and bring their prayers together through physical and telepathic synchronization of heart-effort, the Prayer expands. The Call for Light is amplified, becoming an even broader signal… True Prayer has no definition; no boundary; no rules; no nation, race or dogmatic attitude. Prayer is a presence, a vibration that cleans us, bringing peace and redemption to our perceived “errors,” our forgetting of the Wholeness within that is always available, offering us all we truly need for body and spirit.

see the rest of her post here; A powerful message From ARYZ–Eden Sky....

Coriander Essential Oil; Happiness in a bottle

Coriander happens to be one of my very favorite essential oils, especially when blended with sweet orange. The floral-sweet-green-lively scent puts a smile on my face every time I open the bottle. I use it in almost every blend I make (if possible…some blends it doesn’t suit).

If you think you don’t like coriander essential oil, try sniffing a whiff of its lovely aroma and tell me you didn’t smile 🙂

Read on for more info about this awesome essential oil!

Coriander Essential Oil

Botanical Name: Coriandrum sativum

Plant Part: Seeds

Extraction Method: Steam Distilled

Origin: India

Description: This annual or biennial plant is a native of Morocco and grows to about 1 meter (3 feet) in height. It has sparse, fine, feathery leaves and pinkish/white flowers. The brownish, globose seeds have a disagreeable smell until they ripen, when they take on their spicy aroma. The bright green delicate leaves, umbels of lace-like white flowers are followed by a mass of green (turning brown) round seeds. These seeds are hard and egg-shaped, borne in pairs, which do not separate. The Oleoresin has a strong aroma of coriander.

Color: Colorless to pale yellow clear liquid.

Common Uses: The therapeutic properties of Coriander Essential Oil include being analgesic, aphrodisiac, antispasmodic, carminative, depurative, deodorant, digestive, carminative, fungicidal, revitalizing, stimulant and stomachic. Coriander Oil can be useful to refresh and awake the mind. It can be used for mental fatigue, migraine pain, tension and nervous weakness. This oil’s warming effect is also helpful for alleviating pain such as rheumatism, arthritis and muscle spasms. There are some indications that it can also be useful in combating colds and flu.

Consistency: Thin

Note: Medium

Strength of Aroma: Medium

Blends well with: Coriander Essential Oil blends particularly well with Bergamot, Cinnamon Bark , Ginger, Grapefruit, Lemon, Neroli and Orange.

Aromatic Scent: Coriander Oil has a sweet, spicy, slightly fruity, herbaceous warm smell. It has been claimed by some aromatherapists that the aroma improves if allowed to age.

History: The Egyptians used Coriander seeds as an aphrodisiac. The Romans and Greeks used the seeds to flavor their wines and in India the seeds are used in their cooking. Coriander seeds were even found in the tomb of Tutankhamun. The Carmelite order in France used Coriander seeds to flavor their 17th century eau de toilette and it is still used in Chartreuse and Benedictine liqueurs.

Cautions: Avoid use during pregnancy.

Coriander, the herb of happiness

When I open the bottle a sharp, astringent scent punches out and fills the room. “This isn’t coriander!” I think. The aha moment comes when I realize it may be cilantro – the other part of the plant. I enjoy using coriander seed essential oil in perfumes and have had a couple of bottles of the essential oil that aged nicely to develop a lovely, sweet woody scent reminiscent of rosewood, thanks to the linalool that is present, up to 70% of the essential oil. Smaller percentages of components like thujene, pinene, terpinene and limonene contribute a sharp, herbal and lemony smell and add character as the oil ages. I can smell these in my new coriander supply currently aging on my shelf. Unripe seeds have a higher percentage of aldehydes including trans-2-decenal and decanal that likely add a sharp smell and are responsible for the fresh taste of the leaf, cilantro. The aldehyde C-11 or undecanal is also present in the leaves and is used in perfumes to provide a clean smell. The seeds when immature may smell strongly and be unpleasant but as they age the smell becomes citrusy, woody, spicy and complex. The taste also mellows in older seeds.

Coriander may be one of the oldest flavorings in the world, both seed and leaf. Ancient Egyptians used to bruise the seeds and mix it into their bread. The greens are one of the bitter herbs mentioned in the Bible to be used for Passover. Coriander has been used by the Chinese as a love potion and more recently finds a place in many of the world’s cuisines and all parts are used including the root. Many know the leaves as cilantro and enjoy the spicy citrus taste this herb adds to a variety of foods. Some people, however, detect an unpleasant soapy odor and strongly dislike the herb. Julia Child has been reported to say that she would pluck out any cilantro in her food and throw it on the floor. Distaste for cilantro may be genetic or it may be learned or a combination of both. Like many herbs and spices, coriander is known to be an antioxidant and anti-bacterial and may assist digestion. It is in the carrot/parsley family.

I like how I can get spice and wood from this lovely oil and how it tames cinnamon, if only a little bit. It also provides lift in heavy floral perfumes and is often found paired with rose or jasmine. Coriander was used in Carmelite water by fourteenth century nuns and in Eau de Carmes cologne – a Paris favorite for many years. With a little bit of rose geranium or palmarosa it may be used as a substitute for endangered rosewood in some blends.-from; http://bellyflowers.blogspot.com/2011/03/coriander-herb-of-happiness.html

Angels & Aromatherapy Blog new post; Archangels and Archeiai

See my newest post on the Angels & Aromatherapy Blog;

Archangels and Archeiai; Michael, Raphael, Jophiel, Chamuel, Gabriel, Uriel, and Zadkiel http://ow.ly/1bUjU6

Frankincense & Myrrh: What You Should Know

Frankincense & Myrrh are two of the oldest and most famous of aromatherapy essential oils (resins) known to man. Their history dates back to the beginning of civilization and was prized among kings, royalty, sages, and healers, and as every Christian knows was received as a sacred gift by baby Jesus from the three wise men. The resin has been a major item of commerce for at least 3,000 years. Even today, Frankincense & Myrrh are still prized for their many uses.

The Adoration of the Magi, a tapestry designed by Edward Burne-Jones. The Bible mentions frankincense about 50 times and myrrh about 20. They were used for everything from an aphrodisiac and perfume sachet worn by King Solomon, to incense burned by temples and places of worship around the globe. Frankincense and myrrh are famously two of the three gifts from the Magi to the infant Christ child and were highly symbolic; gold for royalty, frankincense for divinity, and myrrh for suffering.

Frankincense & Myrrh Noted in the Bible (Song of Solomon)

“Who is this coming up from the wilderness
Like palm-trees of smoke,
Perfumed with myrrh and frankincense,
From every powder of the merchant?”

“Till the day doth break forth,
And the shadows have fled away,
I will get me unto the mountain of myrrh,
And unto the hill of frankincense.”

More about Frankincense & Myrrh

Though both frankincense and myrrh tend to bring up certain religious connotations to the western mind, they have been in active use as magical incenses, ritual tools and for their healing properties since at least 1500BC.

In the Chinese medicine books, frankincense was first mentioned in the Mingyi Bielu (Miscellaneous Records of Famous Physicians; ca. 500 A.D.). It was called fanhunxiang (calling back the soul fragrance) and ruxiang (nipple-shaped fragrance); the latter name has been retained, but the former is true to the original use of frankincense as incense for mourning the dead. Myrrh, already known in China, entered the formal herb books somewhat later, in the Kaibao Bencao (Materia Medica of the Kaibao Era, 973 A.D.). Its name, moyao, indicates the medicine (yao) of mo, the Chinese pronunciation of the Arabic name murr, meaning bitter. In modern Chinese Materia Medica, these two resins are classified as herbs for vitalizing circulation of blood and are utilized for treating traumatic injury, painful swellings, masses, and other disorders related to stasis syndromes. Their source remains the Middle East, though frankincense trees have been cultivated in southern China.

Frankincense Tears are known for their use in consecration, meditation, protection and purifying. Along with many other uses…

Myrrh is known for: Protection, purification, healing and magical potency.

Both are known for their use as a sacred tool in many cultures. And it’s best not to use them during pregnancy….especially during 1st trimester. Frankincense may be used heavily diluted after 2nd trimester, but myrrh should not be used during pregnancy.

The traditions of caretaking frankincense trees and harvesting their resin have played an important role in the life of nomadic desert tribes of North Africa for millennia. The trees are owned by families living in the area where they grow; ancient rituals surround the harvesting of the resin, and guardianship of the trees is passed on from generation to generation. The traditions, customs, and ceremonies surrounding frankincense, like many other important plants, are being lost. As people embrace modern lifestyles, the old ways of caring for the plants vanishes, and the plant’s numerous benefits are lost. Frankincense was once a source of many items of commerce, including medicines, dyes, and cosmetics.

Botanically, frankincense trees are an excellent example of the natural diversity that can occur in different species of the same genus, and different varieties of the same species. There has been much confusion about the proper identification of the various types of frankincense, because of differences in species (approximately 25), varieties of individual species, quality of resin, micro-climates, and time of harvesting. Wild frankincense trees have a wide range of characteristics even within the same basic climatic zone.

The essential oil of frankincense contains more than 200 individual natural chemicals, giving the fragrance a very complex bouquet. There is considerable variation in the proportion of these components depending on the micro-climate where the trees grow, the season at which the resin is harvested, and a number of other factors.

Boswellia seedlings are slow growing and are susceptible to livestock grazing before they are able to reach a more mature state. Serrata in particular is becoming endangered and is need of conservation due to extensive farming, overgrazing and poor harvesting practices. Once established, Frankincense trees can live for at least a hundred years. Their flowers are popular with bees, and the long flowering period from October to February is helpful for bee colony maintenance.

Frankincense Al lubán (left) and Myrrh Resin (right) https://traveltoeat.com

I love Aura Cacia’s description,
The deeply meditative aromas of frankincense and myrrh evoke ancient tombs and temples. Their fragrances, like the breath of a prayer, create an olfactory link to the dawning of civilized human society.

The earliest recorded use of frankincense is found in an inscription on the tomb of a 15th century BC Egyptian queen named Hathsepsut. Ancient Egyptians burned frankincense as incense and ground the charred resin into a powder called kohl. Kohl was used to make the distinctive black eyeliner seen on so many figures in Egyptian art. Egyptians also used myrrh resin as incense and as an important ingredient in the embalming process, sometimes placing the crude resin in the eviscerated body cavities of mummies.

Frankincense and myrrh are familiar botanical products in the east, where they’ve been used for millennia. Most people in the west are unfamiliar with the true identity of these enigmatic substances — even though they are frequently mentioned in historical texts, especially scripture, (frankincense is mentioned 22 times in the Bible).

Frankincense and myrrh essential oils are distilled from the resin of two separate but related trees of the burseraceae family. Plants of this family are often sculpted into natural bonsai by the extreme conditions of their desert environments, with eerily contorted trunks and stubby leafless branches.

There are many different species of frankincense (Boswellia) and myrrh (Commiphera) growing from east Africa through southern Arabia and into northwestern India. The general consensus of botanists identifies four main species of Boswellia and two of Commiphera.

Boswellia carteri comes from Somalia. B. sacra comes from southern Saudi Arabia, Yemen and Oman. B. frereana also grows in Somalia. Its resin and essential oil are known as African elemi, (not to be confused with true elemi essential oil, which comes from a Philippine tree). B. serrata grows in India. Its resin and essential oil are known as Indian olibanum.

Commiphera myrrha or true myrrh occurs in Somalia and the Arabian peninsula, along with about eight other species which are often mixed together in commercially available crude resin.

The trunks of both frankincense and myrrh trees exude a sticky substance called oleo gum resin. This oleo gum resin is made up of roughly 65% gum, 30% resin and 4% essential oil (frankincense), and 45% gum, 30% resin and 4% essential oil (myrrh). The tree trunks are incised by collectors to expedite the release of the resin, which dries in the hot desert sun into hard knobby masses called tears — a fitting name considering what the tree goes through, and in light of the fact that myrrh traditionally symbolizes suffering. (Frankincense symbolizes divinity.)

The crude resin of frankincense and myrrh can be treated in one of two ways to produce liquid aromatics. The resin is soluble in chemical solvents and the essential oil can be steam distilled. The solvent extraction process produces a viscous, almost solid substance called a resinoid. Resinoids are soluble in high-grade, odorless alcohols. Alcohol dissolved resinoids are sometimes passed off as distilled essential oils. Resinoids are often used in perfume making. Steam distilled essential oils of frankincense and myrrh are most appropriate for use in aromatherapy.

More About Frankincense:

Oil of frankincense is slightly viscous, yellow to green with a deeply balsamic, fresh-resinous aroma. Sweet-lemony or green apple-like notes add complexity to the overall aroma profile of good quality frankincense oil. Thin, turpentine or solvent-like, weak, short-lived aromas are indicative of poor quality or adulterated frankincense oil.

Other Frankincense Names:

Arbre à Encens, Arbre à Oliban Indien, Boswella, Boswellia, Boswellia serrata, Boswellie, Boswellin, Boswellin Serrata Resin, Encens Indien, Franquincienso, Gajabhakshya, Indian Olibanum, Oliban Indien, Resina Boswelliae, Ru Xiang, Salai Guggal, Salai Guggul, Sallaki Guggul, Shallaki.

Frankincense Medical Uses:

Indian frankincense is used for osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, joint pain (rheumatism), bursitis, and tendonitis. Other uses include ulcerative colitis, abdominal pain, asthma, hay fever, sore throat, syphilis, painful menstruation, pimples, and cancer. Indian frankincense is also used as a stimulant, to increase urine flow, and for stimulating menstrual flow.

How does frankincense work?

The resin of Indian frankincense contains substances that may decrease inflammation.

For more medical uses and drug interactions see WebMD here.

Traditional Use:

Frankincense has a long history as incense. It was burned by the Egyptians and is used in many religious ceremonies. Traditionally it has also been used for skin ailments from acne to wound healing.

Properties:

Analgesic, anti-arthritic, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiseptic, astringent, carminative, digestive, diuretic, expectorant, sedative, tonic, vulnerary

Benefits:

Acne, anxiety, asthma, blemishes, bronchitis, colds, coughs, dry skin, flu, nervousness, rheumatism, scars, skin ailments, stress, ulcers, urinary tract infections, wrinkles, wounds. To take advantage of some of the skin healing properties of this oil it may be added to skin creams or toners.

Blends Well With:

Bergamot, black pepper, camphor, cinnamon, cypress, geranium, grapefruit, lavender, lemon, mandarin, neroli, orange, palmarosa, patchouli, pine, rose, sandalwood, vetiver, ylang ylang

Of Interest: Frankincense has many other names that it is known as. Most commonly you will see it as frankincense, olibanum, or boswellia.

Frankincense history dates back thousands of years, with both spiritual and medicinal uses. It is considered the “holy anointing oil” in the Middle East. The ancient Chinese used frankincense as a treatment for a range of ailments. The Ebers Papyrus, one of the oldest known medical records from the sixteenth century B.C., mentions frankincense oil. The ancient Egyptians listed the oil on hundreds of prescriptions and recipes.

The various types of frankincense include

Boswellia carterii and Boswellia frereana from Ethiopia, Somalia, and Oman; Boswellia thurifera from Somalia and India; Boswellia papyrifera from Ethiopia, East Africa, and the Sudan; Boswellia serrata (also known as Indian frankincense or Salaigugal); and Boswellia sacra (also called hojary, hojari, houjari, hogary, hawjari, hawjeri), which grows wild in inland Arabia. – Carol Wiley

8 Uses for Frankincense essential oil by Dr Axe:

  1. Stress Relieving Bath-Soak
  2. Natural Household Cleaner
  3. Anti-Aging & Wrinkle Fighter
  4. Natural Hygiene Product- It can help prevent dental health issues like tooth decay, bad breath, cavities, or oral infections.
  5. Relieves Symptoms of Indigestion
  6. Scar, Wound, Stretch Mark or Acne Remedy
  7. Natural Cold or Flu Medicine
  8. Helps Relieve Inflammation and Pain
ALSO: 
be sure to read this scientific study: Curcumin & boswellia combo beats top arthritis pain med in trial - without the NSAID-associated risks 

More About Myrrh:

Oil of myrrh is slightly viscous, yellowish to amber orange with a warm-spicy, balsamic fragrance. Overly viscous, dark brown oils may be extracted resinoids and not steam distilled essential oils, which are more useful in aromatherapy applications. Myrrh resinoids are more appropriate as perfume fixatives.

Traditional Use: In the fragrance industry the oil is used as a fixative. Medicinally it is used to treat wounds, and in many oral care products.

Properties: Anticatarrhal, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, astringent, carminative, cicatrisant, emmenagogue, expectorant, fungicidal, sedative, stomachic, tonic, uterine, vulnerary

Benefits: Amenorrhea, arthritis, asthma, athlete’s foot, bronchitis, catarrh, colds, cough, cracked skin, cuts, diarrhea, dyspepsia, eczema, flatulence, gingivitis, gum infections, hemorrhoids, hyperthyroid, laryngitis, leucorrhea, loss of appetite, mouth ulcers, sore throat, thrush, ulcers, wounds, wrinkles. The antimicrobial and astringent properties of this oil make it useful in oral and skin care products.

Blends Well With: Bergamot, chamomile, clove, cypress, eucalyptus lemon, frankincense, geranium, grapefruit, jasmine, juniper, lavender, lemon, neroli, palmarosa, patchouli, pine, rose, rosemary, sandalwood, tea tree, vetiver, ylang ylang

Of Interest: Myrrh has been prevalent throughout history. It was used in the mummification process by the Egyptians. It has been used in religious rituals all over the world, and it is utilized in Chinese and Ayurvedic medicines.

Aromatherapy uses of frankincense and myrrh

Aromatherapy draws on the deeply meditative quality of these oils. A gentle diffusion of a blend of equal proportions of both can evoke emotional balance in cases of anxiety or stress. Such a blend is also appropriate as an adjunct to prayer and meditation. In fact this usage is consistent with the long history of frankincense and myrrh. Frankincense and myrrh can be useful in less relaxing blends as well. Outstanding and unusual aromas can be created by blending the two oils with citrus oils — lemon and bergamot work well with frankincense; orange and tangerine with myrrh. The citrus oils produce a lighter, cleaner, more uplifting aroma, more inspiring and less introspective than using frankincense and myrrh alone. These citrus frankincense and myrrh blends are useful when seeking emotional inspiration. Frankincense and myrrh alone are best used when seeking emotional insight.

One of the most appropriate ways to use frankincense and myrrh may be to burn the crude resin on hot coals as the ancients did. This simple ritual will release a distinctive aroma and sinuous trails of fragrant incense that hold a mysterious presence in the room. The curling tendrils of burning frankincense and myrrh have measured the passage of history, and facilitate the navigation of inner and outer spiritual.

Frankincense & Myrrh by Martin Watt and Wanda SellarA great reference book for enthusiasts of ancient cultures and those interested in the beginnings of aromatherapy and the use of incense. This book charts out and goes into great depth about the ancient spice routes and how each culture (Egyptian and Mesopotamian) viewed and used Frankincense & Myrrh. The book also includes ancient and modern recipes for medicinal used of both resins.

The Many Uses & Benefits of Frankincense

There are so many uses and benefits of frankincense essential oil its hard to list them all, but one thing known about frankincense is  its meditational value and action as a skin tonic. It is considered especially good for dry and mature skin, and is commonly used in high-end skin-care products.

Frankincense contains sesquiterpenes, which stimulate the brain’s limbic system (the center of memory and emotions) and the hypothalamus, pineal, and pituitary glands. The scent can calm and soothe the whole body and mind, while also being stimulating and elevating. Useful for visualizing and improving one’s spiritual connection, frankincense has comforting properties that help center the mind and overcome stress and despair.

In The Fragrant Heavens, Valeria Ann Worwood describes the spiritual benefits of frankincense essential oil as “adaptogenic – it will adapt to a person’s spiritual state of being… capable of offering support in a wide range of circumstances.” And it can “induce feelings of emotional stability, enlightenment, protection, introspection, courage, resolution, fortitude, acceptance and inspiration.”

According to Aromatherapy for Dummies, frankincense essential oil can help improve circulation and improve the integrity of blood vessels (along with bergamot, cedarwood, chamomile, grapefruit, and lemon). Advanced Aromatherapy: The Science of Essential Oil Therapy notes frankincense is used for weakened immune system, asthma, and depression.

According to the Essential Oils Desk Reference, frankincense uses are for depression, cancer, respiratory infections, inflammation, and to enhance the immune system.

In March 2009, a study published in the BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2009, 9:6 showed that frankincense essential oil “suppressed cell viability in bladder transitional carcinoma J82 cells.”

Frankincense is suitable for many conditions and has been shown to:

  • Treat skin inflammation, scarring, wrinkles and acne
  • Encourage cellular regeneration
  • Alleviate headaches
  • Treat allergies
  • Help heal bronchitis, laryngitis, and asthma
  • Enhance digestion
  • Slow down and deepen your breathing
  • Act as a powerful anti-depressant
  • Calm your mind, ease anxiety, and reduce nightmares
  • Have properties that can heal melanoma and some cancers (see this post for more on frankincense healing cancer)

Myrrh is equally beneficial and can:

  • Balance your thyroid and endocrine system
  • Heal fungal and viral infections
  • Enhance your emotional well being
  • Treat ulcers
  • Eliminate gingivitis
  • Rid your body of parasites
  • Relieve asthma, coughs and colds
  • Act as an expectorant and rids your body of congestion
  • Reduce cholesterol

Frankincense Images:


http://members.nbci.com/rashid4/oman/luban/luban.html http://www.mobot.org/MOBOT/research/library/kohler/1761_082.jpg
fine image of frankincense

http://www.hkitaly.it/ayurveda/incenso.htm
excellent image, takes a while to load but shows both Boswellia sacra tree and how oleo-gum-resin exhudes from the trunk

frankincense a microscopic view of Frankincense

http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/religion/pages/frankincense.html
molecular image of frankincense resin-stunning
http://www.khareefsal.om/inner/pic/d2.html
frankincense resin congealing on trunk
http://www.khareefsal.om/inner/pic/e2.html
frankincense tree
http://www.omanet.com/frankincense.htm
harvesting frankincense
http://web.odu.edu/webroot/instr/sci/lmusselman.nsf/pages/listofbibleplant

That site has images of many plants of the bible including frankincense-You need to scroll down the list almost to the bottom to reach Boswellia but there are several excellent pictures of the tree, its flowers and the varioius grades of resin.

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One thing to be very aware of is that if you are interested in purchasing Frankincense and/or Myrrh essential oils, most are adulterated, and diluted, so it may be more beneficial (depending on how you want to use them and what for) just to buy the resins and burn them on hot coals (charcoal), or read more below on crude resin and how it’s made into liquid aromatics as well as where to get therapeutic grade frankincense oil:

Resources and More Reading:

study: Curcumin & boswellia combo beats top arthritis pain med in trial – without the NSAID-associated risks

Great info and back story frankincense & myrrh: http://www.itmonline.org/arts/myrrh.htm

http://aromatictherapeutics.com/inspiration/essential-oil-contraindications

http://www.floracopeia.com/

More info: https://traveltoeat.com/myrrh-and-frankincense-1/
Also, if you are interested in grinding your Frankincense or Myrrh into powders for other uses, see this awesome post;
http://www.apothecarysgarden.com/apps/blog/show/25153121-how-to-grind-frankincense-myrrh

8 Uses for Frankincense essential oil by Dr Axe

Where to buy Sacred Frankincense (therapeutic grade); from a dear friend who is also a distributor for Young Living Oils, see her fb page here.

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Another article about FRANKINCENSE and it’s uses as well as how the Egyptians would use the charred incense ashes as KHOL eye liner , and more here at

http://www.balancemebeautiful.com/benefits-of-frankincense-essential-oil/

by Lily, Editor at Balance Me Beautiful

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Other places:

many resins, incense and raw material: http://www.scents-of-earth.com/frankincense.html

Bella Mira therapeutic grade essential oils ..

Mountain Rose Organic

Organic Essential Oils

 

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Rose Geranium Essential Oil

Rose Geranium

Pelargonium roseum is not only beautiful, but happens to be one of the most useful, and wonderful essential oils we have. As you’ll soon see, it’s uses are many and it’s beauty is more than skin deep.

Rose Geranium, or Geranium Rose-

AuraCacia has this to say about Geranium essential oil:

Pelargonium graveolens, the rose-scented geranium, belongs to the same plant genus as the popular red-flowered window box geranium. Geraniums are native to arid areas of South Africa’s Cape Province. The plant is highly drought resistant, thanks to its semi-succulent, water-conserving stems and leaves.

The essential oil in rose geranium leaves has constituents — geraniol, linalol and citronellol — that are also present in rose oil. It’s not surprising that the aroma of geranium’s fragrance resembles that of rose with a musty, minty-green undertone.

Geranium oil has been described as a natural perfume complete unto itself. It’s often used to scent soaps and detergents because, unlike many other essential oils, rose geranium’s aroma profile is not readily affected by the alkaline nature of soap products.

Rose geranium varies much across strains and distillations, in part because the plant is greatly influenced by the climate and soil in which it grows. Geranium oil can range from very sweet and rosy to musty, minty and green. One type of geranium oil, known as Bourbon, has established itself as a premium perfume oil. Bourbon geranium is cultivated and distilled exclusively on the island of Reunion in the Indian ocean. The environment of Reunion has produced a strain of geranium with a very rich, rosy aroma. Perfumers prefer to work with Bourbon oil because it blends well with a wide array of very different oils including clove, sandalwood and lavender.

The main geranium oil-producing regions of the world are found on the African continent, Russia, China and Reunion. Russian and Chinese oils tend to have a greener, fresh-rosy aroma while Egyptian and Reunion oils tend to be heavier and darker.

Geranium oil is distilled from the above-ground parts of the plant. Most of the essential oil glands are found in its leaves. After cutting, the plants are partially dried to increase the yield of oil. That way there’s less water to be vaporized and extracted from the plant material during the distillation.

Popular during the Victorian era, rose geranium was often kept potted in parlors were a fresh sprig was always available to revive the senses. The fresh leaves were also offered in finger bowls at formal dining tables.

Today, geranium is an indispensable aromatherapy oil. It’s one of the best skincare oils, offering relief from congested, oily and dry skin. On an emotional level, geranium promotes stability and balance.

Aromatherapy Uses: Lifts the spirits, boosts immune system and heals a variety of skin conditions such as eczema, burns, wounds, bruises and others. Great hormonal balancer for women. analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antidepressant, antihemorrhagic, cicatrizant, diuretic, lymphotonic, antimicrobial, antipruritic, antispasmodic , antiviral, astringent, tonic & stimulant, pancreatic stimulant, deodorant, hepato-stimulant, phlebotonic

Skin: acne,burns, bruises, broken capillaries, balances oil glabnd secretion, congested and mature skin, healing especially after facial plastic surgery, eczema, cellulite, mosquito repellent

Respiratory: asthma, sore throat, tonsillitis, clears mucus Muscular/skeletal: osteo- arthritis, rheumatism

Digestive: jaundice, gastritis, colitis, cleans digestive system of mucus, liver tonic

Cardiovascular/Lymphatic: aids poor circulation, stimulates lymphatic system, hemorrhoids, phlebitis

Immune: immune stimulant Endocrine: adrenal, cortical, glandular problems

Genito-Urinary/ Reproductive: eases PMS, menopause, kidney tonic-diuretic

Nervous/ Brain/ Mind: nervous stress, neuro-balancing, neuralgia, quells anxiety, uplifting antidepressant

Rose Geranium

Emotional/Energetic: Taps into the power of the heart, increasing imagination, intuition and sensory world. Increases the capacity for intimate communication, allowing one to receive and to give and express.

Rose geranium’s strong middle note blends well with basil, bergamot, cedar, citronella, clary sage, fennel,  jasmine, juniper, lavender, lemon, lemongrass, neroli, nutmeg, and rosemary. Also Blends very well with: Eucalyptus, lavender, clary sage, rose, lime, orange, frankincense, grapefruit, ylang ylang

RECIPE for

Sunshine Smiles Aromatherapy Recipe

Ingredients

  • 10 drops Bergamot essential oil
  • 10 drops Grapefruit essential oil
  • 15 drops Sweet Orange essential oil
  • 5 drops Rose Geranium essential oil
  • 3 drops Ylang ylang extra essential oil
  • 3 drops Spruce essential oil (or sandalwood for more calming)
  • 4fl oz (125ml) carrier oil of your choice, such as jojoba, grapeseed oil, fractionated coconut oil, hazelnut oil, or any you like.

Directions;

Combine all the ingredients in a dark glass or PET plastic bottle. Store it in a cool, dark place (not your bathroom – it’s too warm and humid.)
To use your aromatherapy bath oil, pour about a tablespoon into the bath after you’ve finished running the water.
Handy Hint: This aromatherapy bath oil is excellent for acne. To boost its acne-fighting powers, use grapeseed oil as the carrier oil (it’s astringent – helps tighten pores and reduce oil production.)

SCIENTIFIC INFO:

Botanical name: Pelargonium Odorantissimum / Graveolens
Botanical family: Geraniaceae

Note: Middle

Part of plant used: Stems and leaves

Origin: Algeria, Reunion, Madagascar and Guinea

Description: Sweet and heavy, similar to Rose

History: The Ancients regarded Geranium as an exceptional vulnerary with the power to mend fractures and eliminate cancers.

Properties and Indications:

  • Antiseptic
  • Astringent – contracts capillaries
  • Stimulates the nervous system
  • Excellent for the skin – eczema and psoriasis
  • Anticoagulant – for circulation
  • Haemostatic – prevents hemorrhage
  • Gentle detoxification
  • Hemorrhoids
  • Varicose veins
  • Harmonizing and re-balancing
  • Regulates and stimulates the adrenal cortex which in turn balances the body

Personality

  • Ambivalent- refreshing and a tonic but also has calming qualities

Safety Data: Non-toxic, non-irritant and non-sensitizing

SOURCES: Sheppard-Hanger Sylla, THE AROMATHERAPY PRACTITIONER REFERENCE MANUAL, Tampa, 1998 Mojay, Gabriel, Aromatherapy for Healing the Spirit, London, 1996 Battaglia, Salvatore, The Complete Guide to Aromatherapy, Brisbane, 1997

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