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Here’s a great list of Holistic Herbal Sources for Natural Nutrition

Herb Sources of Vitamins, Minerals and Trace Minerals
Many herbs are excellent for getting the vitamins and minerals our bodies need
because the body usually digests them easier through plants, much easier
than from fish or animal sources.

Listed below are some herb sources of vitamins, minerals and trace minerals.

VITAMINS
Vitamin A: Alfalfa, Cayenne, Eyebright, Lambs Quarter, Paprika, Red Clover, Violet, Yellow Dock
Vitamin B: Alfalfa, Dulse, Fenugreek, Kelp, Licorice, Saffron
Vitamin C: Bee Pollen, Chickweed, Echinecea, Garlic, Golden Seal, Juniper BerrY, Paprika, Peppermint, Rosehips, Sorrel, Violet, Watercress
Vitamin D: Alfalfa, Dandelion, Red Raspberry, Rosehips, Sarsaparilla, Watercress
Vitamin E: Alfalfa, Burdock, Dandelion, Dong Quai, Kelp, Scullcap, Sesame, Slippery Elm, Watercress
Vitamin G: Fo-ti-tieng
Vitamin K: Alfalfa, Gotu Kola, Shepherd’s Purse
Niacin: Alfalfa, Fenugreek, Parsley Watercress
Vitamin P: (Rutin, Bioflavenoids) Acerola, Paprika

MINERALS
Calcium: Aloe, Cayenne, Chamomile, Fennel, Marshmallow, Sage, White Oak Bark
Cobalt: Dandelion, Horsetail, Juniper Berries, Lobelia, Parsley, Red Clover, White Oak Bark
Iodine: Bladderwrack, Kelp
Iron: Burdock, Chickweed, Ginseng, Hops, Mullein, Nettles, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sarsaparilla, Scullcap, Yellow Dock
Magnesium: Alfalfa, Catnip, Ginger, Gotu Kola, Red Clover, Rosemary, Valerian, Wood Betony
Potassium: Aloe, Cayenne, Fennel, Golden Seal, Parsley, Rosehips, Slippery Elm, Valerian
Zinc: Burdock, Chamomile, Dandelion, Eyebright, Marshmallow, Sarsaparilla

TRACE MINERALS
Alfalfa, Burdock, Dandelion, Kelp, Yellow Dock, Parsley, Red Clover, Rosehips, Sage, Sarsaparilla, Valerian

Hope you find some good use for this info……..

You could prepare them in a number of ways, here’s some examples;

How Do You Prepare Herbs?

Capsule: This is the most popular way most people take their herbs. Some of the reasons: it’s easy, convenient, avoids bitter taste, saves on preparation, and provides an exact regulated dosage to the body.

Decoction: To extract the deeper essences from harder or coarser herbs such as stems, barks, and roots. The herbs are usually simmered uncovered for 10 to 20 minutes until 1/3 of the water has decreased through evaporation, usually one part plant to twenty parts water. Note: for coarser herbs such as Valerian and Burdock, these must be gently simmered in a covered pot to bring out their medicinal properties. Strain before using.

Extracts: Extracts are a highly concentrated alcohol base in liquid form derived from pure herbs. Many people use herbal extracts who are unable to swallow the usual dose. Exact dosages are recommended on individual bottles. This is one of the more convenient ways to take herbs.

Fomentation: A fomentation is an external application of herbs, generally used to treat swellings, pains, cold and flu. To prepare a fomentation, soak a towel or cloth in the desired tea, and apply the towel over the affected area as hot as can be tolerated without burning. Cover the towel with a dry flannel cloth. Repeat as needed.

Infusion: The most common way of preparing herbs. The extraction of the active properties of a substance by steeping or soaking it, usually in water. The usual amount is a teaspoon of leaves, blossoms, or flowers to a cup of boiling water. The water is poured over the herbs, then steeped for 3 to 5 minutes. Strain before using. Honey may be added to taste.

Plaster: A plaster is much like a poultice, but the herbal materials are placed between two pieces of cloth and applied to the affected area. When there is an irritant to the skin, this method will serve to prevent the herb from coming in direct contact with the skin.

Poultice: A poultice is usually used as an antiseptic and to reduce swelling by applying a warm mass of powdered herbs directly to the skin. To prepare, add enough hot water to make a thick paste, then apply directly to the skin. Cover with a hot moist towel and leave on until it cools. Repeat as often as needed.

Salve: A healing or soothing ointment. Use 3 oz. powered herb, 7 oz. cocoa butter, l oz. beeswax, (depending on consistency desired, more beeswax may be needed). Blend all three ingredients together in a covered pot on low heat for 1 to 2 hours. When it is cold, it should be firm and ready to use.

happy herbing!

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Comments on: "Holistic Nutrition; Sources of Vitamins, Minerals & Trace Minerals" (2)

  1. Red raspberry leaves make a healthy herbal tea!

    A natural remedy for morning sickness and breast milk production is red raspberry leaves. Learn how to make a snowy tea from red raspberry leaves. You might discover the tea to be tasty and pleasant. Try it. It could become your favorite remedy to help produce breast milk or for pregnant women with nausea.

    You might prefer this snowy tea as a tasty alternative to red raspberry leave tablets for example. However, you will need to spend time to prepare the tea.

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