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Archive for December, 2008

Essential Oils for the Different Types of Skin

Your skin is a reflection of your inner vitality. For your skin to be the best it can be, it needs natural nutrients to stimulate cellular activity and to protect against external aggressors. By eating right, getting appropriate fresh air and exercise and using natural ingredients for your skin, you will not only look beautiful, but feel great too!

Essential Oils for Types of Skin

SKINCARE (General) Lavender, rose, rosemary camphor, cypress, geranium, chamomiles, rosewood, geranium essential oils and hydrosols

ACNE: Tea tree, Manuka, Helichrysum, lavender, spike lavender, thyme linalool, rose geranium, tea tree, Petitgrain, grapefruit, sandalwood, Vetiver, mints, basil, German chamomile, atlas Cedarwood, rosewood, Palma Rosa, thyme, Cajeput, Niaouli, Yarrow Hydrosol

ASTRINGENT: Grapefruit, yarrow, rosemary, lime distilled

BLACK HEADS: Coriander, thymus vulgaris, peppermint, lemongrass

CHAPPED/ CRACKED SKIN: Myrrh, patchouli, sandalwood, Vetiver, Cajeput, roman & German chamo, lavender, Calendula infused oil.

CHILBLAINS: Black Pepper, Cinnamon leaf, clove bud, ginger, lavender. (ie, circulatory stimulants to promote warming.)

CLEANSING: Sweet Basil, juniper, lemon, lemongrass, Niaouli, peppermint

COMBINATION SKIN: Geranium, Rosewood, Ylang-ylang, Rose Geranium Hydrosol, Neroli Hydrosol

COUPEROSE (Thread veins, congested capillaries)Lemon, Helichrysum, cypress, rose, lavender, parsley, roman & German chamomiles, geranium, calendula infused oil, Helichrysum or neroli hydrosols.

DEVITALIZED SKIN: Eucalyptus globulous, myrtle, neroli, basil juniper, lemon, lemongrass, Niaouli, peppermint, pine, orange, oregano, rosemary, spearmint, geranium, grapefruit

DRY ACNE: Petitgrain, lavender, spike lavender, clary, rose geranium

DRY SKIN: Carrot seed, Cedarwood, clary, jasmine, geranium, lavender, orange, Palma Rosa, rose, roman chamomile, rosewood, neroli, Petitgrain, Mandarine petitgrain, Vetiver, sandalwood, ylangylang, carrot seed, lavender, rose or neroli hydrosol, Calendula infused oil.

ECZEMA: German Chamomile, Helichrysum, Lavender, Bergamot, Carrot Seed, Atlas Cedarwood, Roman Chamomile, Juniper, Myrrh, Palma Rosa, Patchouli, Sandalwood, Teatree, Yarrow, Ylangylang. Calendula infused oil, Cranberry Seed Oil

HYDRATING: Palma Rosa, sweet orange, Mandarin, tangerine, rose, most hydrosols, esp. Neroli

INFECTIONS: German chamo, Manuka, eucalyptus, lavender, myrrh, roman chamo, rosemary, spikenard, tea tree, thyme linalool, calendula, Palma Rosa, Niaouli, laurel, myrtle, rosewood

INFLAMMATION: Helichrysum, st. johns Wort infusion, carrot seed, Cistus, galbanum German & Roman chamomiles, clary, myrrh, myrtle, rosewood, angelica, yarrow, Helichrysum, Witch hazel or Chamomile Hydrosols

ITCHING: Jasmine, heli, lavender, peppermint, roman chamo, Lavender or Witch Hazel hydrosol

LARGE PORES: Myrtle, lemongrass, rose, Cedarwood

MATURE, AGED SKIN, WRINKLES:Carrot seed, elemi, Cistus, frankincense, galbanum, fennel, geranium, myrrh, patchouli, rose, Clary, rosewood, sages, cypress, fennel, lavender, neroli. also Sea Buckthorn Berry Extract,
Consider Yellowstar*Essentials Mature Skin Elixir: The secret to younger looking skin. A base of Jojoba oil with Sea Buckthorn Berry and Rose Hip Seed extracts added with Neroli, Rose, Roman Chamomile and other wonderful essential oils.

NORMAL SKIN: Atlas Cedarwood, geranium, jasmine, lavender, neroli, roman chamo, rose, rosewood, ylangylang, angelica, all hydrosols

OILY SKIN: Roman & German chamos, Cedarwood, (atlas, red, texas) geranium, Clary, lavender, Ylang-ylang, lemon, peppermint, Niaouli, Cajeput, cypress, calendula infusion, frankincense, patchouli, sandalwood, juniper, Melissa, yarrow, coriander, Petitgrain, lime distilled, grapefruit, thyme linalool, Lavandin, spike lavender, rose

PIMPLES, blemishes: Tea tree, Manuka, Lemon Myrtle, German Chamomile, Helichrysum italicuum, thyme linalool, Cajeput, oregano (spot only) Niaouli, rosemary

PSORIASIS:(extremely difficult to treat) Bergamot, Helichrysum, Cajeput, carrot seed, German or roman chamomile, Lavender, Juniper, Sandalwood, Tea tree Calendula infused oil, Cranberry Seed Oil

PUFFINESS: Oregano, Spanish marjoram, cypress, peppermint, rosemary, fennel, celery, clary, roman chamo

REGENERATION: Frankincense, lavender, neroli, patchouli, rose, rosemary, sandalwood, teatree, Helichrysum, elemi, Vetiver, spikenard, caraway, Palma Rosa, Spanish sage, Clary, lavender, galbanum, myrrh, myrtle, calendula, carrot seed, Cistus,

REVITALIZING BASAL LAYER Carrot seed, Rosewood, Niaouli, tea tree, orange, calendula

ROSACEA: German chamomile, Helichrysum italicuum, rosewood, Helichrysum hydrosol

SENSITIVE SKIN: Roman & German chamomile, rose, Palma Rosa, Helichrysum, neroli, rosewood, carrot, angelica, jasmine, Neroli, Chamomile or Yarrow Hydrosols

SCARS: Helichrysum (in a base of Rose Hip Seed Oil), carrot seed, lavender, petitgrain, galbanum

SKIN TONER: Calendula infused , lemongrass, chamomiles, lavender, neroli, orange, rose, frankincense, Petitgrain, lemon, hydrosols

HERE’S AN EASY 20 MINUTE SKIN CARE ROUTINE

(1). Cleanse face with gentle cleanser to suit skin type, using a cotton ball or a washcloth.

(2). Steam face with head over bowl of steaming hot water for 2 minutes.

(3). Apply moisturizing, purifying face mask.

(4). Bath or shower with a few drops of relaxing essential oil
or invigorating oil in the water. You may also put used herbal tea bags, or cucumber or potato slices over your eyes to remove the bagginess around the eyes. Relax totally for 10 minutes.

(5). Pat body dry with thick warm towels. Apply body lotion all over while skin is still moist. Take special care of feet, knees, elbows, and neck.

(6). Remove mask with warm water and spray or splash face with mineral water.

(7). Apply eye-soothing gel (if you are going out) or night eye cream (if you are going to bed) around eyes and on lids.

(8). Apply moisturizer to face if going out, or your favourite night cream/oil if not.

(9). Apply hand cream and a nail cream around cuticles

Basic Skin Care

A daily routine of skin care requires no more than ten minutes and requires only three simple steps each evening and morning:

(1). Cleanse

(2). Tone

(3). Moisturize

Night care

(1). Cleanse: Remove any makeup with cleansing cream or a natural makeup remover. Wash with mild soap or other cleanser, rinse, and pat dry.

(2). Ton: Apply an acid-containing solution to restore the pH balance and protective shield. For dry skin, use a mild freshener-toner. For oily skin, use an astringent preparation.

(3). Moisturize. Splash on cool water or mist with a spray bottle. Blot, but do not dry completely-moisturizer magic relies more on retaining moisture than in providing it-then smooth on a few drops of your moisturizer.

Day care

(1). Cleanse lightly to remove night time accumulations, refresh your face with a few splashes of water, and pat dry.

(2). Tone by applying a freshener or astringent.

(3). Moisturize around your eyes. If your face is excessively dry, mist or splash with water, blot, and then lightly cover with moisturizer.

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Essential Oils for the Different Types of Skin

Your skin is a reflection of your inner vitality. For your skin to be the best it can be, it needs natural nutrients to stimulate cellular activity and to protect against external aggressors. By eating right, getting appropriate fresh air and exercise and using natural ingredients for your skin, you will not only look beautiful, but feel great too!

Essential Oils for Types of Skin

SKINCARE (General) Lavender, rose, rosemary camphor, cypress, geranium, chamomiles, rosewood, geranium essential oils and hydrosols

ACNE: Tea tree, Manuka, Helichrysum, lavender, spike lavender, thyme linalool, rose geranium, tea tree, Petitgrain, grapefruit, sandalwood, Vetiver, mints, basil, German chamomile, atlas Cedarwood, rosewood, Palma Rosa, thyme, Cajeput, Niaouli, Yarrow Hydrosol

ASTRINGENT: Grapefruit, yarrow, rosemary, lime distilled

BLACK HEADS: Coriander, thymus vulgaris, peppermint, lemongrass

CHAPPED/ CRACKED SKIN: Myrrh, patchouli, sandalwood, Vetiver, Cajeput, roman & German chamo, lavender, Calendula infused oil.

CHILBLAINS: Black Pepper, Cinnamon leaf, clove bud, ginger, lavender. (ie, circulatory stimulants to promote warming.)

CLEANSING: Sweet Basil, juniper, lemon, lemongrass, Niaouli, peppermint

COMBINATION SKIN: Geranium, Rosewood, Ylang-ylang, Rose Geranium Hydrosol, Neroli Hydrosol

COUPEROSE (Thread veins, congested capillaries)Lemon, Helichrysum, cypress, rose, lavender, parsley, roman & German chamomiles, geranium, calendula infused oil, Helichrysum or neroli hydrosols.

DEVITALIZED SKIN: Eucalyptus globulous, myrtle, neroli, basil juniper, lemon, lemongrass, Niaouli, peppermint, pine, orange, oregano, rosemary, spearmint, geranium, grapefruit

DRY ACNE: Petitgrain, lavender, spike lavender, clary, rose geranium

DRY SKIN: Carrot seed, Cedarwood, clary, jasmine, geranium, lavender, orange, Palma Rosa, rose, roman chamomile, rosewood, neroli, Petitgrain, Mandarine petitgrain, Vetiver, sandalwood, ylangylang, carrot seed, lavender, rose or neroli hydrosol, Calendula infused oil.

ECZEMA: German Chamomile, Helichrysum, Lavender, Bergamot, Carrot Seed, Atlas Cedarwood, Roman Chamomile, Juniper, Myrrh, Palma Rosa, Patchouli, Sandalwood, Teatree, Yarrow, Ylangylang. Calendula infused oil, Cranberry Seed Oil

HYDRATING: Palma Rosa, sweet orange, Mandarin, tangerine, rose, most hydrosols, esp. Neroli

INFECTIONS: German chamo, Manuka, eucalyptus, lavender, myrrh, roman chamo, rosemary, spikenard, tea tree, thyme linalool, calendula, Palma Rosa, Niaouli, laurel, myrtle, rosewood

INFLAMMATION: Helichrysum, st. johns Wort infusion, carrot seed, Cistus, galbanum German & Roman chamomiles, clary, myrrh, myrtle, rosewood, angelica, yarrow, Helichrysum, Witch hazel or Chamomile Hydrosols

ITCHING: Jasmine, heli, lavender, peppermint, roman chamo, Lavender or Witch Hazel hydrosol

LARGE PORES: Myrtle, lemongrass, rose, Cedarwood

MATURE, AGED SKIN, WRINKLES:Carrot seed, elemi, Cistus, frankincense, galbanum, fennel, geranium, myrrh, patchouli, rose, Clary, rosewood, sages, cypress, fennel, lavender, neroli. also Sea Buckthorn Berry Extract,
Consider Yellowstar*Essentials Mature Skin Elixir: The secret to younger looking skin. A base of Jojoba oil with Sea Buckthorn Berry and Rose Hip Seed extracts added with Neroli, Rose, Roman Chamomile and other wonderful essential oils.

NORMAL SKIN: Atlas Cedarwood, geranium, jasmine, lavender, neroli, roman chamo, rose, rosewood, ylangylang, angelica, all hydrosols

OILY SKIN: Roman & German chamos, Cedarwood, (atlas, red, texas) geranium, Clary, lavender, Ylang-ylang, lemon, peppermint, Niaouli, Cajeput, cypress, calendula infusion, frankincense, patchouli, sandalwood, juniper, Melissa, yarrow, coriander, Petitgrain, lime distilled, grapefruit, thyme linalool, Lavandin, spike lavender, rose

PIMPLES, blemishes: Tea tree, Manuka, Lemon Myrtle, German Chamomile, Helichrysum italicuum, thyme linalool, Cajeput, oregano (spot only) Niaouli, rosemary

PSORIASIS:(extremely difficult to treat) Bergamot, Helichrysum, Cajeput, carrot seed, German or roman chamomile, Lavender, Juniper, Sandalwood, Tea tree Calendula infused oil, Cranberry Seed Oil

PUFFINESS: Oregano, Spanish marjoram, cypress, peppermint, rosemary, fennel, celery, clary, roman chamo

REGENERATION: Frankincense, lavender, neroli, patchouli, rose, rosemary, sandalwood, teatree, Helichrysum, elemi, Vetiver, spikenard, caraway, Palma Rosa, Spanish sage, Clary, lavender, galbanum, myrrh, myrtle, calendula, carrot seed, Cistus,

REVITALIZING BASAL LAYER Carrot seed, Rosewood, Niaouli, tea tree, orange, calendula

ROSACEA: German chamomile, Helichrysum italicuum, rosewood, Helichrysum hydrosol

SENSITIVE SKIN: Roman & German chamomile, rose, Palma Rosa, Helichrysum, neroli, rosewood, carrot, angelica, jasmine, Neroli, Chamomile or Yarrow Hydrosols

SCARS: Helichrysum (in a base of Rose Hip Seed Oil), carrot seed, lavender, petitgrain, galbanum

SKIN TONER: Calendula infused , lemongrass, chamomiles, lavender, neroli, orange, rose, frankincense, Petitgrain, lemon, hydrosols

HERE’S AN EASY 20 MINUTE SKIN CARE ROUTINE

(1). Cleanse face with gentle cleanser to suit skin type, using a cotton ball or a washcloth.

(2). Steam face with head over bowl of steaming hot water for 2 minutes.

(3). Apply moisturizing, purifying face mask.

(4). Bath or shower with a few drops of relaxing essential oil
or invigorating oil in the water. You may also put used herbal tea bags, or cucumber or potato slices over your eyes to remove the bagginess around the eyes. Relax totally for 10 minutes.

(5). Pat body dry with thick warm towels. Apply body lotion all over while skin is still moist. Take special care of feet, knees, elbows, and neck.

(6). Remove mask with warm water and spray or splash face with mineral water.

(7). Apply eye-soothing gel (if you are going out) or night eye cream (if you are going to bed) around eyes and on lids.

(8). Apply moisturizer to face if going out, or your favourite night cream/oil if not.

(9). Apply hand cream and a nail cream around cuticles

Basic Skin Care

A daily routine of skin care requires no more than ten minutes and requires only three simple steps each evening and morning:

(1). Cleanse

(2). Tone

(3). Moisturize

Night care

(1). Cleanse: Remove any makeup with cleansing cream or a natural makeup remover. Wash with mild soap or other cleanser, rinse, and pat dry.

(2). Ton: Apply an acid-containing solution to restore the pH balance and protective shield. For dry skin, use a mild freshener-toner. For oily skin, use an astringent preparation.

(3). Moisturize. Splash on cool water or mist with a spray bottle. Blot, but do not dry completely-moisturizer magic relies more on retaining moisture than in providing it-then smooth on a few drops of your moisturizer.

Day care

(1). Cleanse lightly to remove night time accumulations, refresh your face with a few splashes of water, and pat dry.

(2). Tone by applying a freshener or astringent.

(3). Moisturize around your eyes. If your face is excessively dry, mist or splash with water, blot, and then lightly cover with moisturizer.

 

ALSO SEE MORE SKIN CARE ARTICLES:

 

A Helpful Glossary of Aromatherapy Terms

How many times have you come across a description of a specific essential oil you are interested in only to find that the language used to describe its effects are just as foreign as its uses.
I’ve compiled a list that should help decipher any of those terms you should come across.

Enjoy!

Glossary of Aromatherapy Terms

ABORTIFACIENT: Induces childbirth or premature labor.

AEROPHAGY. An excess of air in the alimentary canal that is relieved through burping or flatulence.

ALTERATIVE: Gradually improves the nutritional state of the body.

ANALGESIC: Relieves or reduces pain.

ANAPHRODISIAC: Reduces sexual desire.

ANESTHETIC: Numbs the nerves and causes a loss of sensation.

ANTHELMINTIC: Expels or kills intestinal worms.

ANTIBACTERIAL: Kills bacteria.

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Reduces or prevents depression.

ANTIDIARRHOEIC: Relieves diarrhea.

ANTIDOTE: Counteracts a poison.

ANTIEMETIC: Counteracts nausea and stops vomiting.

ANTIFUNGAL: Kills fungal infections.

ANTIGALACTAGOGUE: Reduces the production of milk secretion of nursing mothers.

ANTI-INFLAMMATORY. Reduces inflammation.

ANTILITHIC: Prevents formation of stones or calculus.

ANTINEURALGIC: Stops nerve pain.

ANTIPHLOGISTIC: Counteracts, reduces, or prevents inflammation.

ANTIPRURITIC: Relieves or prevents itching.

ANTIPUTRID: Stops putrefaction.

ANTISCLEROTIC: Removes deposits from circulatory vessels.

ANTISCORBUTIC: Preventative for scurvy.

ANTISEPTIC: Inhibits the growth of and kills bacteria.

ANTISPASMODIC: Relieves or prevents spasms, cramps, and convulsions.

ANTISUDORIFIC: Reduces perspiration.

ANTITOXIC: Counteracts poisons.

ANTITUSSIVE: Relieves coughs.

ANTIVIRAL: Weakens or kills viruses.

APERIENT: A gentle purgative of the bowels.

APERITIF: Appitite stimulant.

APHRODISIAC: Arouses sexual desires.

BALSAMIC: Softens phlegm.

BRONCHODILATOR: Expands the spastic bronchial tube.

CALMATIVE: Mild sedative or tranquilizer.

CARDIAC: Stimulates or affects the heart.

CARDIOTONIC: Tones the heart muscle.

CARMINATIVE: Expels gas from the intestines.

CEPHALIC: Problems relating to the head.

CHOLAGOGUE: Increases the flow of bile.

CHOLERETIC: Stimulates the production of bile.

CICATRIZANT: Helps the formation of scar tissue; healing.

COAGULANT: Clots the blood.

CYTOPHYLACTIC: Protects the cells of the organism.

DECONGESTANT: Relieves congestion.

DEMULCENT: Soothes irritated tissue, particularly mucous membranes.

DEPURATIVE: Cleanses and purifies the blood and internal organs.

DETERSIVE: Detergent. Cleanses wounds and sores, and promotes the formation of scar tissue.

DIAPHORETIC: Causes perspiration.

DISINFECTANT: Kills infections and disease producing microorganisms.

DIURETIC: Increases the secretion and elimination of urine.

EMETIC: Induces vomiting.

EMMENAGOGUE: Promotes and regulates menstruation.

EMOLLIENT: Softens the skin, and soothes inflamed and irritated tissues.

ESTROGENIC: Similar to estrogen.

EUPHORIANT: Brings on an exaggerated sense of physical and emotional well-being.

EXPECTORANT: Promotes the discharge of mucous from the lungs and bronchial tubes.

FEBRIFUGE: Reduces or prevents fevers.

FIXATIVE: Holds the scent of a fragrance.

GALACTAGOGUE: Promotes or increases the secretion of milk in nursing mothers.

GERMICIDE: Kills germs.

HALLUCINOGEN: Induces hallucinations-an imagined or false sense of perception.

HEMOSTATIC: Stops hemorrhaging.

HEPATIC: That which acts on the liver.

HYPERTENSOR: Raises the blood pressure.

HYPNOTIC: Induces sleep.

HYPOTENSOR: Lowers the blood pressure.

INSECTICIDE: Kills insects.

LARVICIDE: Kills the larvae of insects.

LAXATIVE: Promotes the elimination from the bowels; a mild purgative.

NERVINE: Calming and soothing to the nervous system.

PARASITICIDE: Kills parasites.

PECTORAL: Affecting the respiratory system.

PURGATIVE: Promotes vigorous elimination from the bowels.

REGENERATOR: Promotes new growth or repair of structures or tissues.

REJUVENATOR: Assists in promoting a youthful appearance.

RELAXANT: Lessens or reduces tension, and produces relaxation.

RESOLVENT: Reduces swellings.

RESTORATIVE: Restores consciousness and/or normal physiological activity.

RUBEFACIENT: A local irritant that reddens the skin.

SEDATIVE: Calms anxiety and promotes drowsiness.

STIMULANT: Excites or quickens an activity in the body.

STOMACHIC: Strengthens, stimulates, and tones the stomach.

SUDORIFIC: Promotes or increases perspiration.

TONIC: Strengthens and revitalizes the body or specific organs.

TRANQUILIZER: Calms the nerves.

VASOCONSTRICTOR: Constricts the blood vessels.

VASODILATOR: Dilates the blood vessels.

VERMIFUGE: Expels intestinal worms.

VULNERARY: Assists healing of wounds and sores by external application

A Helpful Glossary of Aromatherapy Terms

How many times have you come across a description of a specific essential oil you are interested in only to find that the language used to describe its effects are just as foreign as its uses.
I’ve compiled a list that should help decipher any of those terms you should come across.

Enjoy!

Glossary of Aromatherapy Terms

ABORTIFACIENT: Induces childbirth or premature labor.

AEROPHAGY. An excess of air in the alimentary canal that is relieved through burping or flatulence.

ALTERATIVE: Gradually improves the nutritional state of the body.

ANALGESIC: Relieves or reduces pain.

ANAPHRODISIAC: Reduces sexual desire.

ANESTHETIC: Numbs the nerves and causes a loss of sensation.

ANTHELMINTIC: Expels or kills intestinal worms.

ANTIBACTERIAL: Kills bacteria.

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Reduces or prevents depression.

ANTIDIARRHOEIC: Relieves diarrhea.

ANTIDOTE: Counteracts a poison.

ANTIEMETIC: Counteracts nausea and stops vomiting.

ANTIFUNGAL: Kills fungal infections.

ANTIGALACTAGOGUE: Reduces the production of milk secretion of nursing mothers.

ANTI-INFLAMMATORY. Reduces inflammation.

ANTILITHIC: Prevents formation of stones or calculus.

ANTINEURALGIC: Stops nerve pain.

ANTIPHLOGISTIC: Counteracts, reduces, or prevents inflammation.

ANTIPRURITIC: Relieves or prevents itching.

ANTIPUTRID: Stops putrefaction.

ANTISCLEROTIC: Removes deposits from circulatory vessels.

ANTISCORBUTIC: Preventative for scurvy.

ANTISEPTIC: Inhibits the growth of and kills bacteria.

ANTISPASMODIC: Relieves or prevents spasms, cramps, and convulsions.

ANTISUDORIFIC: Reduces perspiration.

ANTITOXIC: Counteracts poisons.

ANTITUSSIVE: Relieves coughs.

ANTIVIRAL: Weakens or kills viruses.

APERIENT: A gentle purgative of the bowels.

APERITIF: Appitite stimulant.

APHRODISIAC: Arouses sexual desires.

BALSAMIC: Softens phlegm.

BRONCHODILATOR: Expands the spastic bronchial tube.

CALMATIVE: Mild sedative or tranquilizer.

CARDIAC: Stimulates or affects the heart.

CARDIOTONIC: Tones the heart muscle.

CARMINATIVE: Expels gas from the intestines.

CEPHALIC: Problems relating to the head.

CHOLAGOGUE: Increases the flow of bile.

CHOLERETIC: Stimulates the production of bile.

CICATRIZANT: Helps the formation of scar tissue; healing.

COAGULANT: Clots the blood.

CYTOPHYLACTIC: Protects the cells of the organism.

DECONGESTANT: Relieves congestion.

DEMULCENT: Soothes irritated tissue, particularly mucous membranes.

DEPURATIVE: Cleanses and purifies the blood and internal organs.

DETERSIVE: Detergent. Cleanses wounds and sores, and promotes the formation of scar tissue.

DIAPHORETIC: Causes perspiration.

DISINFECTANT: Kills infections and disease producing microorganisms.

DIURETIC: Increases the secretion and elimination of urine.

EMETIC: Induces vomiting.

EMMENAGOGUE: Promotes and regulates menstruation.

EMOLLIENT: Softens the skin, and soothes inflamed and irritated tissues.

ESTROGENIC: Similar to estrogen.

EUPHORIANT: Brings on an exaggerated sense of physical and emotional well-being.

EXPECTORANT: Promotes the discharge of mucous from the lungs and bronchial tubes.

FEBRIFUGE: Reduces or prevents fevers.

FIXATIVE: Holds the scent of a fragrance.

GALACTAGOGUE: Promotes or increases the secretion of milk in nursing mothers.

GERMICIDE: Kills germs.

HALLUCINOGEN: Induces hallucinations-an imagined or false sense of perception.

HEMOSTATIC: Stops hemorrhaging.

HEPATIC: That which acts on the liver.

HYPERTENSOR: Raises the blood pressure.

HYPNOTIC: Induces sleep.

HYPOTENSOR: Lowers the blood pressure.

INSECTICIDE: Kills insects.

LARVICIDE: Kills the larvae of insects.

LAXATIVE: Promotes the elimination from the bowels; a mild purgative.

NERVINE: Calming and soothing to the nervous system.

PARASITICIDE: Kills parasites.

PECTORAL: Affecting the respiratory system.

PURGATIVE: Promotes vigorous elimination from the bowels.

REGENERATOR: Promotes new growth or repair of structures or tissues.

REJUVENATOR: Assists in promoting a youthful appearance.

RELAXANT: Lessens or reduces tension, and produces relaxation.

RESOLVENT: Reduces swellings.

RESTORATIVE: Restores consciousness and/or normal physiological activity.

RUBEFACIENT: A local irritant that reddens the skin.

SEDATIVE: Calms anxiety and promotes drowsiness.

STIMULANT: Excites or quickens an activity in the body.

STOMACHIC: Strengthens, stimulates, and tones the stomach.

SUDORIFIC: Promotes or increases perspiration.

TONIC: Strengthens and revitalizes the body or specific organs.

TRANQUILIZER: Calms the nerves.

VASOCONSTRICTOR: Constricts the blood vessels.

VASODILATOR: Dilates the blood vessels.

VERMIFUGE: Expels intestinal worms.

VULNERARY: Assists healing of wounds and sores by external application

What Are Essential Oils?

The term Essential Oil comes from the Latin word “essentia” meaning “essence” and are volatile, meaning
“to fly” because they are a liquid that quickly becomes gaseous.

Essential Oils are highly concentrated and potent oils extracted from plants, trees, shrubs, flowers and leaves or any other natural component.
Aromatherapy is the process of diffusing pure essential oils, and thus plant essences, which then are absorbed through inhalation and our sense of smell. Smell has an effect on our perceptions and how we react physically, emotionally, and mentally to our surroundings.

Various every day scents remind us of the seasons of the year, our location or situation, potential dangers or happy occasions. Essential oils may effect the physical, mental and emotional aspect of our lives.

Inhalation of essential oils may also effect the release of brain chemicals such as seratonin. Other essential oils have healing qualities when applied topically.

Essential oils are very expensive to produce, some more so than others, due to the labor intensive
process and the quantity of the plant required to produce the oil,
Approximately 400 kg of Thyme would produce 1 kg of essential oil ,
2000 kg of rose petals to make 1kg of Rose oil ,
6 tons of orange blossom to produce 1 kg of Neroli ,
and 4 million Jasmine flowers to produce 1 kg of Jasmine absolute.

Its no wonder some are so very costly.

What Are Essential Oils?

The term Essential Oil comes from the Latin word “essentia” meaning “essence” and are volatile, meaning
“to fly” because they are a liquid that quickly becomes gaseous.

Essential Oils are highly concentrated and potent oils extracted from plants, trees, shrubs, flowers and leaves or any other natural component.
Aromatherapy is the process of diffusing pure essential oils, and thus plant essences, which then are absorbed through inhalation and our sense of smell. Smell has an effect on our perceptions and how we react physically, emotionally, and mentally to our surroundings.

Various every day scents remind us of the seasons of the year, our location or situation, potential dangers or happy occasions. Essential oils may effect the physical, mental and emotional aspect of our lives.

Inhalation of essential oils may also effect the release of brain chemicals such as seratonin. Other essential oils have healing qualities when applied topically.

Essential oils are very expensive to produce, some more so than others, due to the labor intensive
process and the quantity of the plant required to produce the oil,
Approximately 400 kg of Thyme would produce 1 kg of essential oil ,
2000 kg of rose petals to make 1kg of Rose oil ,
6 tons of orange blossom to produce 1 kg of Neroli ,
and 4 million Jasmine flowers to produce 1 kg of Jasmine absolute.

Its no wonder some are so very costly.

History of Aromatherapy


HISTORY OF AROMATHERAPY

With origins dating back over 5000 years, Aromatherapy is truly one of the oldest methods of holistic healing.

In the Beginning:
Ancient man was dependent on his surroundings for everything from food, to shelter and clothing. Being so keenly aware of everything around him, and how it could be used for survival, he quickly discovered methods to preserve food and treat ailments through herbs and aromatics.
Aromatherapy, as it is practiced today, began with the Egyptians, who used the method of infusion to extract the oils from aromatic plants which were used for medicinal and cosmetic purposes as well as embalming.
At a similar time, ancient Chinese civilizations were also using some form of aromatics. Shen Nung’s herbal book (dating back to approximately 2700 BC) contains detailed information on over 300 plants and their uses.
SImilarly, the Chinese used aromatics in religious ceremonies, by burning woods and incense to show respect to their Gods – a tradition which is still practiced today. The use of aromatics in China was linked to other ancient therapies such as massage and acupressure.
Aromatherapy has also been used for many centuries in India. Ayurveda, the traditional medical system of India, uses dried and fresh herbs, as well as aromatic massage as important aspects of treatment.
The Greeks acquired most of their medical knowledge from the Egyptians and used it to further their own discoveries. They found that the fragrance of some flowers was stimulating while others had relaxing properties. The use of olive oil as the base oil absorbed the aroma from the herbs or flowers and the perfumed oil was then used for both cosmetic and medicinal purposes.
The Romans learned from the Greeks and became well known for scented baths followed by massage with aromatic oils. The popularity of aromatics led to the establishment of trade routes which allowed the Romans to import “exotic” oils and spices from distant lands such as India and Arabia.
With the decline of the Roman Empire, the use of aromatics faded and the knowledge of their use was virtually lost in Europe during the dark ages.

More History on AROMATHERAPY
The humble beginning of Aromatherapy, which literally means therapy of healing through the sense of smell.

Aromatherapy dates back thousands of years and has been used by most of the ancient civilizations. Most of the stories of ‘the medicine man’ were of professionals schooled in the use of essential oils.

The Chinese civilizations used some form of aromatics dating back to 2700 BC. These historical references contain detailed information on over 300 plants and their uses.
The Chinese also used aromatics in religious ceremonies, a tradition which is still practiced today. The Chinese were also involved in other ancient therapies such as massage and acupressure, hence the term eastern medicine.

Aromatherapy has also been used for many centuries in India. Ayurveda, the traditional medical system of India, uses dried and fresh herbs, as well as aromatic massage as important aspects of treatment.

In ancient Egypt, aromatherapy was a way of life. The essential oils of plants were used during religious rituals raising a higher consciousness or promoting a state of tranquility. Egyptians used the principles of this art in their cooking as well. Specific herbs aided in the digestive process, protected against infection and improving the immune system.

The Greeks acquired most of their medical knowledge from the Egyptians and used it to further their own discoveries. Hypocrites commonly known as the “Father of Medicine” was the first to study this scientifically. The Greeks found that some fragrances were stimulating while others had relaxing properties. Aromatherapy was used for both cosmetic and medicinal purposes.

The Romans learned from the Greeks and became well known for scented baths followed by massage with aromatic oils. With the decline of the Roman Empire, the use of aromatics faded and the knowledge of their use were virtually lost.

One of the few places where the tradition of Aromatherapy continued was in monasteries, where monks used plants from herbal gardens to produce infused oils, herbal teas and medicines. During the Middle Ages, it was discovered that certain aromatic derivatives helped to prevent the spread of infection.

The revival of the use of essential oils is credited to a Persian physician and philosopher known as Avicenna. The Persians initiated a method of extraction known as distillation, and study of the therapeutic use of plants once again became popular. The knowledge of distillation spread and the lost process was once again returned to Europe. By 1200 AD, essential oils were being produced in Germany and were based mainly on herbs and spices brought from Africa and the Far East.

When the conquistadors invaded South America, even more medicinal plants and aromatic oils were discovered, and the wide variety of medicinal plants found in Montezuma’s gardens provided a basis for many new and important remedies and treatments.

Throughout the northern continent, Native American Indians were using aromatic oils and producing their own herbal remedies, which were discovered when settlers began to make their way across the plains of the New World.

Although herbs and aromatics had been used in other world cultures for many centuries, it was not until the 19th century that scientists in Europe and Great Britain began researching the effects of essential oils on humans. It was French chemist, Rene Maurice Gattefosse who discovered the healing powers of lavender oil after burning his hand in his laboratory. He published a book on the anti-microbial effects of the oils in 1937 and the term “Aromatherapy” was born.

The discovery of Penicillin and creation of synthetic drugs has conditioned modern society to readily accept instant cures. In many medical circles, aromatherapy and holistics as a whole are considered “soft” sciences, because cures are less speedy and are difficult to prove scientifically. The proof of the effectiveness of aromatherapy lies in our ancestors, who survived throughout the ages in this hard world equipped with only a natural instincts.

During World War II, the French army surgeon Dr. Jean Valnet used essential oils as antiseptics. Later, Madame Marguerite Maury elevated aromatherapy as a holistic therapy. She started prescribing essential oils as remedy for her patients. She is also credited with the modern use of essential oils in massage. Aromatherapy works the best when used on the mind and body simultaneously.

Even after reading the history of aromatherapy many westerners remain skeptical of this science. Only after they consider the modern uses of aromatherapy do they say “Oh, I get it.”

Some of the more common and mainstream examples of aromatherapy include:

Mentholated vapor rub (to loosen congestion in the chest and breathing passages)
Spa treatments such as the use of Eucalyptus especially in a steam room
Perfumes, Colognes, deodorizers and room fresheners

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