a fun and informative blog about aromatherapy, alternative medicine & the healing arts, beauty, & the mind-body-spirit

COLD SORES
These nasty little – painful lesions – are caused by the herpes simplex virus and are contagious. There may be pain or tingling one to two days before the cold sores appear. Cold sores generally clear in seven to ten days. They’re sometimes confused with canker sores, which are not contagious but produce small, painful ulcers in the soft tissues of the mouth, such as the tongue and the walls of the mouth.

Many essential oils can help with viral infections but need to be in your system soon after you are exposed.   Those that suffer from cold sores know there can be many things that ‘trigger’ an outbreak.  Stress,  whether it be from emotional or physical – being run down so a cold or flu can take hold can easily bring on a cold sore.

Prevention is best done by controlling your exposure to stress and of course others with colds and flus.  But once your ‘cold sore’ has attacked, you may get relief by applying a drop of Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) has antiviral properties. In a research study conducted in hospitals and dermatology clinics in Germany, lemon balm cream promoted the healing of blisters in five days compared to 10 days in the control group. Used on regularly, lemon balm cream may decrease the frequency of recurrences.

Also Tea tree (one drop neat) on the blisters several times throughout the day.  Tea Tree can be applied ‘neatly’ which means undiluted.  Lavender may also be applied neatly.  Roman chamomile, Eucalyptus, Bergamot, Peppermint and Geranium may also stop the blistering in it’s tracks.  To apply these other oils first mix them with a small amount of vodka. The best ratio is up to 6 drops in 5 ml of vodka.   Mix well and dab on the blister using a cotton-tip applicator.

A study by the University of Heidelberg found that peppermint essential oil was found to penetrate the skin and have a direct virucidal effect againt the herpes simplex virus. Peppermint oil was also found to be active against an acyclovir-resistant strain of the herpes simpex virus. Although it’s promising, peppermint oil shouldn’t be used until studies have established its safety. Peppermint oil is absorbed through the skin so even small amounts could be toxic. Peppermint oil should never be ingested unless it is therapeutic grade.

Remember everyone’s immune system is different and with Aromatherapy we can try different essential oils – what works for one person may not work for the next.  Usually you can find one that works best for you.  Keep a journal of what you try at each outbreak.  Recording things like how much, how applied and what oil(s) were used.  Soon you will know what works best for you!
If the blisters open up, mixing any of the above essential oils with a small amount of Sweet Almond oil will help to keep the skin moist and less likely to crack.  All essential oils have healing properties and will help your body to heal itself.

Read more from “cold sore remedies” from about.com here.  

 

So, here’s the essential oil recipe for cold sores:

  • 3 drops lemon balm (melissa)
  • 2 drops tea tree
  • 3 drops lavender
  • 3 drops eucalyptus
  • 3-4 drops geranium
  • 3 drops Roman chamomile
  • 3 drops bergamot

Add to 1 oz of sweet almond oil if you have dried and cracked cold sores,

or 2 oz. vodka for wet/ type cold sores to dry them out and heal them. Shake before each use.

here are other natural remedies and natural cures for cold sores:

Lysine

Lysine is an essential amino acid, meaning that we must get it through food or supplements because the body can’t make it on its own. It’s used to make protein, which we need to produce infection-fighting antibodies, enzymes, hormones, and body tissues. Lysine has been found to inhibit the spread of the herpes simplex virus.

Although we get lysine through food sources such as red meat, milk, eggs, cheese, wheat germ, brewers yeast, and fish, what appears to be most important is the ratio of lysine to another amino acid, arginine. They compete with each other for absorption in the intestines, so the less arginine there is in the diet, the more lysine is absorbed. Foods that are rich in arginine include chocolate, peanuts, and almonds.

In addition to these temporary dietary changes:

Lysine supplements

  • Lysine supplements (e.g. 1,000 mg taken three times a day) may help to shorten the duration of cold sores.
  • Lysine ointment – a pilot study by the Southern California University looked at the effectiveness of a lysine-containing ointment in 30 people. Researchers found that the ointment produced full resolution in 40% of participants by the third day and in 87 percent by the end of the sixth day. No adverse effects were reported.

Reishi and Astragalus

Reishi, also called Ganoderma lucidum is a type of mushroom that has a long history of use in traditional Asian medicine to strengthen the immune system.

Preliminary evidence shows that reishi may inhibit the spread of the herpes virus. A typical dose is 600 milligrams once or twice a day.

Reishi is available in powder or supplement form. Reishi can delay blood clotting, so consult your doctor before taking reishi if you are taking aspirin, warfarin (coumadin), or any other medications or supplements that interfere with clotting.

In traditional Chinese medicine, reishi is often used in conjunction with a herb called astragalus. Astragalus has been found to improve immune function in people with herpes simplex keratitis.

Resveratrol

Resveratrol, a compound found naturally in red grapes, has been shown to be active against the herpes simplex virus in laboratory studies.

A study by the Northeastern Ohio University demonstrated that resveratrol cream applied topically two, three, or five times a day effectively suppressed cold sore development if it was applied one or 6 hours after infection with the herpes virus.

Resveratrol cream was also found to be as effective as 5% acyclovir ointment (Zovirax). Resveratrol cream also effectively suppressed cold sore formation in animals with herpes simplex infection that was resistant to acyclovir. No side effects were reported.

Propolis

Propolis, also called bee propolis, is a brownish, resinous substance. Bees collect it from poplar and conifer buds and use it “cement” their hives and keep them germ-free. It is sold in health food stores.

A study found that propolis was active against herpes simplex 1 virus. It is believed to work by preventing the virus from entering body cells and by blocking the replication and spread of the virus. For more information about propolis, read the Propolis Fact Sheet.

Self-Heal

The herb self-heal, also known as Prunella vulgaris is a perennial plant commonly found in China and Europe.

Extracts of this herb have been found to be effective against both herpes simplex 1 and 2 viruses. It is also believed to work against acyclovir-resistant strains of the herpes virus.

Other Remedies

  • Echinacea – A study by the University of Ottawa found that echinacea is active against herpes simplex type 1.
  • Black currant – An extract of black currant, also known as Ribes nigrum or Kurokarin in Japan, was found to fight the herpes virus in laboratory studies.
  • Rhubarb and sage cream – A German study examined rhubarb-sage cream compared to sage cream and Zovirax in 149 people with oral herpes cold sores. The combined topical sage-rhubarb preparation proved to be as effective as topical aciclovir cream and tended to be more active than the sage cream.
  • Undaria pinnatifida – known as wakame in Japan, undaria is a type of seaweed that has been found to improve the healing time and reactivation of herpes infections.

Safety Precautions

People with tuberculosis, leukemia, diabetes, connective tissue disorders, multiple sclerosis, HIV or AIDS, any autoimmune diseases, organ transplant, or possibly, liver disorders should not take herbs or supplements that improve immune function (such as reishi and astragalus) without consulting their doctor first. Taking immune-boosting supplements may reduce the effectiveness of medications that suppress the immune system.

Big thanks to Cathy Wong, ND
About.com Alternative Medicine for helpful information.

More alternative cures and remedies for cold sores:

health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/natural-medicine/home-remedies/home-remedies-for-cold-sores

4 natural remedies for cold sores

how to heal a cold sore naturally wikihow

home remedies for cold sores

common vitamins and supplements for cold sores web md

 

 

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Comments on: "essential oil recipe for cold sores" (10)

  1. Fantastic, informative information here. I will certainly try the essential oil recipe when I get another one of these terrible cold sores. I don’t get them very much but I’ve noticed that when I do get them I’m usually REALLY angry about something, but have kept it bottled up inside??
    Lysine is THE BEST thing I have used so far. As soon as I get that tingly feeling I start taking that and the cold sore never fully erupts.

  2. Recipe works WONDERS!!! Better than Abreva! Stopped my cold sore in its tracks, literally!!! AMAZING!!!

  3. Essential oils have not been studied extensively in the field of cold sore treatments. Though more studies are needed to show its effectiveness, but some people do find relief using them to treat their cold sores. For best result, use essential oils like peppermint oil when you feel the early symptoms – tingling. You may be lucky that the sore will not form.

  4. I have found that when I am stressed-on comes the cold sore…I tried something new and
    it worked like a charm. Colgate plain white (no gel type) toothpaste-a pea size dot in hand adding 1/8 to 1/4 teasp coarse salt, mix together. Use a q-tip on tingly spot and let dry. Do
    this several times a day and over night. Within 24-36 hours, I start applying Earth Theraputics foot repair balm made up of tea tree oil, aloe vera and chamomile…NO nasty
    liquid filled bumps or scabs ever appeared.

  5. I don’t know your background but I want to share the following information with you so you can kick your blog up a notch to the status it deserves. I do research for a living; a recent herbal remedy search kicked up your blog repeatedly. You have good information but your lack of citations truly bothers me. Please give the proper credit to the websites you cut and paste your information from. When you cut and paste verbatim, as you have in this post, it’s plagarism unless you cite your sources. You have talent, an audience which adores you judging from their comments, and an obligation to provide accurate information to those people who follow your blog. You are a wellness journalist -even if only in the blogosphere. You owe it to yourself and your readers to be legit in every way possible. I cannot urge you strongly enough to take the next step in your blogging efforts and be as professional in your due diligence as you can. You have serious potential, following this simple advice will take your work to a whole new level. The best to you.

    Regards,

    Laurie-Ann

    • thanks so much Laurie-Ann…appreciate your suggestions and comments (always love advice) :) Please note that I’ve tried to list everyone/place that I’ve found info from to cite sourcing and it’s always possible that I miss some, so thanks for noticing!! all the best to you too!

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